YES! Another one those career threads!

BravoHotel

Well-Known Member
My mind is boggled. I'm 31, no house, no girlfriend, no kids and I live on a island.

My acronyms include ERAU BSPA, ATP's CMEL, CSEL, IA ~750TT, USMC ARFF/EMT, CA ANG 2A531, PMDY FAR Part 139 ARFF, OPS and Ops Manager, now PWAK "Follow Me" , USPA B , and FAA Senior Parachute Rigger.

What the heck am I doing with my life? I figured out it has something to do with airplanes. I would like to fly airplanes. But there is frankly too many options on the table. Uggg. My dilemma.

Is there a professional career counselor for those of us who need career counseling?
 

Soul Brotha'

Well-Known Member
jtrain609 mentioned this b4 in another thread and I agree 100%. If you want to fly airplanes, fly airplanes for a living. Getting advice on here our from some professional career counselor will give you so many different answers it will probably leave you more confused then when you first asked. Build more time and get a job flying airplanes. There are so many different kinds of flying jobs to choose from. Good luck and PM me if you want some really bad advice about this industry ;).
 

Boris Badenov

He comes to save the day in a broken truck.
Relax. 31 is the new 21. Seriously, though, there will always be the ten percenters who somehow wind up at a major at 25, etc etc, but between the extremely tough economic climate (and I'll spare you my boilerplate lecture on the whys and wherefores of that) and the fact that our notion of "career expectations" is carried over from a generation with a significantly shorter life expectancy, you're not really all that far "behind", insofar as that's a even a meaningful idea. You can still easily spend thirty years (or more) operating aviation appliances, if that's what you want to do.

Now relax and have a drink, you're finally old enough!
 

ljg

Well-Known Member
For anyone who cares to listen, aviation career progression is not a race. You're on top today, you're on bottom tomorrow.

At 31 I think you're doing just fine.
 

Nark

Sheepdog
Give me a shout. If you're willing to move to undesirable spots I can see what I can do for a fellow Devil Dog.

When were you in and where were you stationed? I know a few 7051's...
 

BravoHotel

Well-Known Member
Give me a shout. If you're willing to move to undesirable spots I can see what I can do for a fellow Devil Dog.

When were you in and where were you stationed? I know a few 7051's...
1999-2003 MCAS Yuma, AZ, MCAS Futenma Okinawa Japan

Undesirable locations usually translate into favorable returns. I am interested. My time here at Wake winds down in about four months.
 

Matt13C

Well-Known Member
Completely unrelated and maybe a bit stupid, but what is there to do on Wake Island if you are not working? Is everything military controlled or is there a local population, with its own culture and stores and homes? Is there scuba or snorkling or any sort of entertainment besides JC?
 

Qutch

Question everything
Completely unrelated and maybe a bit stupid, but what is there to do on Wake Island if you are not working? Is everything military controlled or is there a local population, with its own culture and stores and homes? Is there scuba or snorkling or any sort of entertainment besides JC?
One interesting phenomenon about being on Wake and other similar islands is that it does a number on some people's heads. With or without recreation, some handle it better than others. I love the time I got to spend on some of these Military Base islands, but I could leave when I wanted to and did not stay very long. I refused an invitation to do a project on Adak though (another Naval Base off the coast of Alaska - just a rock). It's hard to explain the mental transformation that some people go through on these islands. Some start to kind of disconnect and zone out. Some go a little crazy.
.
 

BravoHotel

Well-Known Member
Completely unrelated and maybe a bit stupid, but what is there to do on Wake Island if you are not working? Is everything military controlled or is there a local population, with its own culture and stores and homes? Is there scuba or snorkling or any sort of entertainment besides JC?
There is no indigenous population here. Outside of work there is exercise. I have a bike and round trip from one side the island and back is a little over 12 miles. We have a well equiped gym that someone should spend a little more time in. There are kayaks, snorkeling and we do have a SCUBA club. I can't dive right now because of an ear infection. The diving is amazing usually with >100 feet visibility. We also have a MWR fishing boat that goes out occassionally. The downside. No visitors. You can't catch an opportune flight out as easily as you would think. Also the politics and the military control of this island can be a bit strong at times. Our internet here is slow. But works well for a forum such as this. The island's favorite past time seems to be to consume alcohol.

Our bar is only open three nights a week as our store. We have one place to eat, our chow hall.

I like it best when we have a high influx of aircraft transiting through here, because my job really is to help them out. Days like today where we have one airplane are kind of slow, and I have a lot of down time to other things like cut grass.

If you have any other questions go ahead and ask!
 

UAL747400

Well-Known Member
I'm 27 and flying freight. I say that I want to do corporate flying most of the time, but I also secretly desire legacy/national/121 freight.

Almost every single day I look at my peers and friends sitting happily(yes, happily) at the regionals with better schedules and more freedom to do things and think I'm ridiculously far behind, and I am when it comes to the "normal path". It doesn't help that all you hear is "You MUST fly jets/FMS/glass/crew" to do legacy/national 121". I'm confident that my back door strategy flying freight will work however. My cutoff for taking this path is 5 years before "settling" for what I've found up to this point to be an undesirable path. It's a 5 year gamble, and will require a hell of a lot more leg work networking and badgering. I'm OK at networking, but VERY good at badgering. Politely of course. :D

As mentioned before, it's not race and several(if not the majority) have "made it" only to be smashed back down to the bottom. You won't know you made the right career choices until you retire. HOWEVER, if what you're wanting is to settle down and start a life(wife, kids, house, ect...), there are certain areas of aviation that are more conducive for this. What I'm doing, and perhaps even what you're doing aren't the way. No women on this earth would put up with my moving around! haha I have the means and desire to buy a house as well, but given the moving around, it just wouldn't work. Not without being a complete boob financially speaking.

Weigh your situation carefully and proceed accordingly. I'm perfectly happy with the prospect being single and moving around for another 5 years, for now. If this mentality were to change next year or in 4 years, I'd jump head long into the regional market this instant, or go back to flight instructing and wait for a charter/corporate job to open up that may never come, knowing that I may have wasted a couple years.

To put it another way. You have 34 years of working left ahead of you. Even longer if you don't do 121. That's a really really long time to do/try many things.

The ONLY reason I'm doing what I'm doing, in addition to what I already mentioned, is pay. 5 years freight vs 5 years regionals is more money and the stability is arguably better. I may or may not have more flight time, and more importantly, TPIC time as well. Many things to weigh in when picking a path. Mine is just one example and a pretty risky one in regards to potentially "wasting time".

Sorry, my post is a bit of a mess. To lazy to edit and organize.
 

KSCessnaDriver

Well-Known Member
I'm 23, single, no kids, no house, no car, no living expenses, ZERO QOL and I have job that non-pilots think is the coolest pilot job ever. I would literally take anything at this point to increase my QOL, regardless of pay. 17 months of living in hotel rooms really, really starts to get to you after a while. I realize that at some point every job gets to the point where it may not be exciting all the time, but at least most you get at least a few days off a month in your own place of residence with no way for work to interfere with your day off.

Living on an island doesn't sound half bad to me right now.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
My mind is boggled. I'm 31, no house, no girlfriend, no kids and I live on a island.
Consider this though, seriously: Having been to Wake, you've had the opportunity that most people will never get, to have been to an island that played a large part in WWII, much like Midway. Few people will ever get to see these places, even though they're very historically significant.

What about going full time with your ANG unit?
 

BravoHotel

Well-Known Member
Consider this though, seriously: Having been to Wake, you've had the opportunity that most people will never get, to have been to an island that played a large part in WWII, much like Midway. Few people will ever get to see these places, even though they're very historically significant.

What about going full time with your ANG unit?
The historical aspect of these island is amazing, I am honored to be here. This is my fifth WWII battle-site I have visited. Also Midway, Iwo Jima, Okinawa and a very few minutes on Corrigidor. When we have airplanes here it is also great. After my tour here it will be 5 years on remote islands. I really would like to be somewhere that I could have a significant other and a normal(ish) life for a pilot.

I thought about that the full time deal with my Guard unit. I joined the ANG to get a grounding in aircraft maintenance.(And I was feeling Patriotic) But it is not what I really want to do full time. I don't mind going in more than one weekend a month. When we have a Phase Inspection or a Home Station Check they usually issue extra man days, or go TDY with the airplane both would be great. I would like to get on for a temporary technician to get increased exposure to the C-130. I am however leaning more towards flying airplanes as a career.
 
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