X Plane 10 or Prepar3d

JayAlarm

Well-Known Member
I am a Macbook Pro user on the verge of replacing my MBP with another, although one thing from stopping me is making the decision on the right simulator. I want something that I can have fun with like a kid, but also use to help myself practice. Only real reason I am worried about what to buy is that Prepar3d is not supported on Apple systems. Any advice is greatly appreciated! Thanks
 

somewhereupthere

Well-Known Member
What about using a windows virtual machine on that macbook?

I know a few folks with prior experience using a VM on a mac. @DhruvK you should chime in, since you're also an x-plane 10 guy.
 

crticalaoa

Well-Known Member
On a serious note. I recommend x-plane. Are you looking more GA flying or simulating the systems of an airliner? Prepard 3d has better system simulation than xplane.
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
I still run FSX. If you want realism, it's all in the add-ons. You can get anything realistic from a single engine piston to a large heavy from numerous websites...if you're willing to fork a little money.

I see a lot of X-Plane supporters now but I've got so much invested into my FSX, I won't be changing anytime soon. I've also heard a lot of great things from the X-Plane physics as well. I'd choose that route...that's where I'll be going once I'm finally forced out.
 

JayAlarm

Well-Known Member
On a serious note. I recommend x-plane. Are you looking more GA flying or simulating the systems of an airliner? Prepard 3d has better system simulation than xplane.
I'm working towards my PPL right now, so probably GA mainly for practice, but do want to enjoy learning the system of airliner aircraft since that's ultimately what I want to do. You recommend X Plane?
 

crticalaoa

Well-Known Member
I say go x-plane route. I think it will fit you better. But if you do end up going check out the aircrafts by a2a. Great physics for fsx, prepard.
 

wheelsup

Well-Known Member
Don't get wrapped up into what is a more "realistic" flight model wise...let's be honest they're going to be close either way and there is nothing that comes close to the seat of the pants feeling of real life. It's procedure you're practicing on it not how many degrees to pitch the nose down doing a power off stall...

I haven't kept up but get the one that has the best built in ATC to practice real world stuff. You're going to be using this mainly as an instrument trainer although back when I did my PPL I used FS2004 to practice entering traffic patterns at fields so it does have some limited use in the VFR environment. You really can't go wrong with FSX, should do all of what you need it to do for a relatively limited cost. Check into TrackIR or similar equipment, that seems to be a really good way to go these days, makes it pretty realistic. I'm jealous of all these guys doing their training now, so much is available to reduce training costs.
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
Don't get wrapped up into what is a more "realistic" flight model wise...let's be honest they're going to be close either way and there is nothing that comes close to the seat of the pants feeling of real life. It's procedure you're practicing on it not how many degrees to pitch the nose down doing a power off stall...

I haven't kept up but get the one that has the best built in ATC to practice real world stuff. You're going to be using this mainly as an instrument trainer although back when I did my PPL I used FS2004 to practice entering traffic patterns at fields so it does have some limited use in the VFR environment. You really can't go wrong with FSX, should do all of what you need it to do for a relatively limited cost. Check into TrackIR or similar equipment, that seems to be a really good way to go these days, makes it pretty realistic. I'm jealous of all these guys doing their training now, so much is available to reduce training costs.
I've used realistic flight simulator models for studying flows which helped me out tremendously. You're right when it comes to the climb, cruise, and descent portion and how they're all similar but some of these will help tremendously with flows. That's what I used throughout all my training and yes...breaking the rust off instruments but there are a lot of other valuable items in certain simulators and add ons. Especially if you've never used an FMC...some are pretty tremendous.

Unfortunately, that being said, not many regional jet help but either way...they've got almost every trainer and/or private turbine jet or prop you could think of to practice with. I did lots of touch in go's in various aircraft I flew in real life just to be better at flows from start to finish.

Of course, we're all different but that was an effective way to keep my brain running rather than note cards/picture study 24/7.
 

wheelsup

Well-Known Member
I've used realistic flight simulator models for studying flows which helped me out tremendously. You're right when it comes to the climb, cruise, and descent portion and how they're all similar but some of these will help tremendously with flows. That's what I used throughout all my training and yes...breaking the rust off instruments but there are a lot of other valuable items in certain simulators and add ons. Especially if you've never used an FMC...some are pretty tremendous.

Unfortunately, that being said, not many regional jet help but either way...they've got almost every trainer and/or private turbine jet or prop you could think of to practice with. I did lots of touch in go's in various aircraft I flew in real life just to be better at flows from start to finish.

Of course, we're all different but that was an effective way to keep my brain running rather than note cards/picture study 24/7.
Yes that is what I said...flows are procedures...

Who cares if the "sim" does 500 FPM when the airplane does 600. I mean really. You have guys that get wrapped up around the axle about "realism" in the flight models, who gives a crap. Heck back then most people were flying the Cessna with a Thrustmaster joystick straight out of the F16...
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
Yes that is what I said...flows are procedures...

Who cares if the "sim" does 500 FPM when the airplane does 600. I mean really. You have guys that get wrapped up around the axle about "realism" in the flight models, who gives a crap. Heck back then most people were flying the Cessna with a Thrustmaster joystick straight out of the F16...
I was just giving them accreditation for their physics realism. A lot goes into the realism though and having the FSX CRJ to practice compared to an $80 add on CRJ makes a lot of difference in your procedures practices.

My point is, you shouldn't be practicing in something that is oddly different than the real thing. It's a waste of time. I'm not talking about stalls, but the entire configuration of all your instruments/cockpit...when there is something out there with an exact identical cockpit and fully functional switches to help you practice in the correct way. The physics come along as bonus for any flight sim enthusiasts but that's just the software.

We could of course go on and on about hardware add ons or online ATC practice and etc. But at least have the correct software for your practicing. I use a joystick too because for me it's about the practice in the cockpit management and flows. That being said I've always been a flight sim enthusiast, so I always admired the extra qualities. That being said I understand why some don't...it can be pointless.
 

wheelsup

Well-Known Member
I was just giving them accreditation for their physics realism. A lot goes into the realism though and having the FSX CRJ to practice compared to an $80 add on CRJ makes a lot of difference in your procedures practices.

My point is, you shouldn't be practicing in something that is oddly different than the real thing. It's a waste of time. I'm not talking about stalls, but the entire configuration of all your instruments/cockpit...when there is something out there with an exact identical cockpit and fully functional switches to help you practice in the correct way. The physics come along as bonus for any flight sim enthusiasts but that's just the software.

We could of course go on and on about hardware add ons or online ATC practice and etc. But at least have the correct software for your practicing. I use a joystick too because for me it's about the practice in the cockpit management and flows. That being said I've always been a flight sim enthusiast, so I always admired the extra qualities. That being said I understand why some don't...it can be pointless.
You practice with a CRJ in FS?

You know they send us to a Level D sim, right? It has the actual cockpit and everything, they're really advanced these days.
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
You practice with a CRJ in FS?

You know they send us to a Level D sim, right? It has the actual cockpit and everything, they're really advanced these days.
Lol. They don't even have an $80 CRJ, but I was just using an example. Is that comment necessary?

Anyways, it worked out great for me for my Commercial, Multi, CFI/CFII certs with all the online tools and added functions of payware.

Anyone can be a smart ass and mock it all they want. I don't plan on walking into my next companies Level-D simulator staring glamorously at the pretty display (not suggestioning you did) but instead having a background of my airplane. That goes for any aircraft I've ever flown as a student or instructor.

That's all the help I can give. Clearly, two different mindsets and ways to study but it worked out well for me and all my checkrides. Hopefully it can help someone else.
 

ChasenSFO

hen teaser
Depends what kind of PC you have. Can you run X-plane 10 or P3D at full settings? If no, then go with Xplane 10 or FSX. If you can, then I highly recommend P3D. Much more visually realistic. Xplane uses a "plasuable" engine for its scenery, and the stock airports have little to no detail. While the planes fly more realistically as a whole, some of the good add-on planes for FSX/P3D fly very realistically as well, and the panels are usually much more realistic and more systems are simulated vs. the add-on planes for X-plane usually. Plus way, way better free stuff out there, and spending a little money(like getting the FTX add-ons from a company called Orbix) can make your sim visually ultra-real in one install.

I just finished upgrading my PC to a monster with a top of the line graphics card, 32GB of ram, great CPU, and run it off a 45 inch TV with using a mix of the Saitek X52 throttle(the joystick in the pack sucks) and a Thrust Master T-16000 joystick(just AWESOME response and can be used left or right handed) on either side of me in a gaming chair angled up at the TV. Still get 30+ frames per second. It's intense. Like...intense. P3D v3(newest version whichc is very new, worth noting here that every version is a new game just like FS2000, FS2002, FS2004, ect so you can't just update it) has SO much detail and simulates the physics of flying much more realistically than FSX did(mostly noticeable in ground effect and slow flight). As a training tool, it is priceless. I like to take a Grumman Tiger over downtown SF, kill the engine, and figure out where to glide. The add-on scenery simulates the building heights, trees, and terrain well enough to make it very reasonable. Here is a video of the add-on SF scenery I have as seen in P3D at full settings. I think this is an older version as well, looks even better in v3.


I own X-plane 10, it looks cool enough, but the crash detection is very unrealistic(see how hard you can slam planes down) and it simply just doesn't look as cool. Plus it's much harder to mod, in my experience. I also much prefer the Microsoft/Lockheed interface for everything.

You practice with a CRJ in FS?

You know they send us to a Level D sim, right? It has the actual cockpit and everything, they're really advanced these days.
I know right, what's the point of practicing on your own computer with a working virtual cockpit that simulates all the systems of the plane you're hired to fly and going to spend the next few months learning to fly to make training, you know ,easier? Go ahead and hate on him, I just wish I could be as cool as you. But I guess I'll always just be a loser with his flight simulator. Not like flight-sim add-ons are a multi-million dollar industry or anything, who would want a piece of that nerdy pie when they'll be judged by studs like you?
 

Adler

Low-Level Individual
I know right, what's the point of practicing on your own computer with a working virtual cockpit that simulates all the systems of the plane you're hired to fly and going to spend the next few months learning to fly to make training, you know ,easier? Go ahead and hate on him, I just wish I could be as cool as you. But I guess I'll always just be a loser with his flight simulator. Not like flight-sim add-ons are a multi-million dollar industry or anything, who would want a piece of that nerdy pie when they'll be judged by studs like you?
I mean, it's fun to do an aerobatic routine in it, but I don't know how much you can actually learn.
 

ChasenSFO

hen teaser
I mean, it's fun to do an aerobatic routine in it, but I don't know how much you can actually learn.
Breh, if you can't "actually learn" from an authentic visual representation of a cockpit with all the instruments, systems, and navaids working, then that's on you. It's great for screwing around doing dumb stuff in virtual airplanes, but it is also a great training tool. Not for the feel of the plane, but for planning/navigating, working the systems and instrument flying in general. If you go online with VATSIM or anything like that, it's also great practice talking on the radio, getting clearances and revisions, ect.
 

JordanD

Honorary Member
Breh, if you can't "actually learn" from an authentic visual representation of a cockpit with all the instruments, systems, and navaids working, then that's on you. It's great for screwing around doing dumb stuff in virtual airplanes, but it is also a great training tool. Not for the feel of the plane, but for planning/navigating, working the systems and instrument flying in general. If you go online with VATSIM or anything like that, it's also great practice talking on the radio, getting clearances and revisions, ect.
Get on that actual training, breh.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Call me a nerd, but I use FS2002 with the A320 Professional add-on for brush up before a sim event.

And once in SEA on a turn, we had a family board and noticed one of their kids was really interested about what we were doing. We invited him in and he talked about his interest in flying (14 yr old) and how had FSX with some A320 program. I offered him to load the box and thought I would tell him what to do... turned out that wasn't necessary. This guy did the whole thing. Asked me what I wanted in the Rad/Nav page and put the bearing pointer up. Armed the FDs. This kid was doing a lot of things specific to the A320 for a normal 14 year old. I have to hand it to these addons for flight sim. Some of them really do get into the nitty gritty details.
 
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