Wow Cessnas New Panels Are Awesome

That display looks great! I wonder how much those MFD's(multi function displays) cost in relation to all of the instruments that they replace?
 

I_Money

Moderator
Boy I would hate to see the manual to learn how to operate it!! I learnt to fly when there was dials and paper licenses - back when flying wa flying, not discussing with a computer how to fly!!
 

CK

Well-Known Member
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That display looks great! I wonder how much those MFD's(multi function displays) cost in relation to all of the instruments that they replace?

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$25,000..........
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
I'd hate to go partial panel in that, looks like you'd just have an AI, altimeter, airspeed, and mag compass with no TC.
 
25,000 isn't bad. I'm pricing avionics now. When I was an airline mechanic, we could fix almost anything by R&R the AHARS or the MFD, total time? 2 minutes, it took longer to fill out the logbook than fix the bird. Considering how often individual indicators and instruments fail, glass cockpits are far more reliable.
 

CK

Well-Known Member
Well you figure a GNS530 is $16,000 so a 25,000 for two of there 1000's isn't that bad.......
 

darrenf

resident denizen
Keep in mind it isn't $25,000 for the Garmin 1000. It is $25,000 plus all the instruments that you are replacing. You could easily spend $15,000 on the HSI alone. The $25,000 Cessna quotes is over and above the Nav II option, which already adds $37,000 to the price of the airplane.
 

Captain_Bob

Well-Known Member
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DIAMOND, CESSNA TO OFFER GARMIN GLASS
The future of general aviation instrument panels appears to be glass. Two manufacturers, Diamond and Cessna, will offer the Garmin G1000 primary flight displays and integrated multifunction displays in their aircraft next year. Diamond will be first to offer the system, in the DA40 Diamond Star. The two 10-inch display panels come with a redesigned instrument panel to provide better viewing angles, ventilation, and aesthetics. The panel is finished with laser-etched polycarbonate overlays, a feature the company says is normally found only on turbine aircraft. Diamond estimates that the upgrade will cost $25,000 more than a Diamond Star set up with conventional IFR equipment. First deliveries are planned for first quarter of 2004. Cessna, meanwhile, will offer the G1000 in the 182 and Turbo 182 Skylanes and 206 and Turbo 206 Stationairs in the second quarter. Surprisingly, at $297,500, the package price remains the same as the current Nav II avionics-equipped Skylanes.

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From the article in AOPA... No change in price on the 182's and 206's...
 

chunk75

Well-Known Member
Cirrus will still eat their lunch! Why would you buy a 40 year old airframe design when you could get a SR-20 or 22 for the same $$?
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
If I had enough money for a decked out brand-new Cessna 172, I'd be out shopping for a used Beechcraft Bonanza and probably use the rest of the money left over for my first two annuals.

A36's, V35's and F33's are the shiznit!

Did I say "shiznit" correctly Chicaga?
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
I've never understood the market for brand new aircraft. For the price of a brand new Beech Baron, you could more or less purchase a King Air C90 with a low SMOH time on the engines.
 

JHines

New Member
Yes, but if the doctors, lawyers, CEOs, senior airline captains, etc. dont' keep buying the outrageously priced new ones, the supply of used ones for us mere financial mortals is going to dry up
 

cimepilot

Well-Known Member
I have to agree with Chunk on this one. After spening 20 hours in a Cirrus and many hours in 182s and 172s, why would anyone buy a Cessna? It is an under-performer that is slow to climb and slow to cruise. Cessna needs to do some research on composite airframes.
 

Joe

Well-Known Member
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I've never understood the market for brand new aircraft.

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Well, somebody's gotta buy them new... otherwise there'd be no used aircraft!
 

jonnyb

Well-Known Member
Doug, you're totally right. Before I left, the company I used to work for bought a sweeeeeeet ass F90 for $975K. Usually, I wouldn't praise a 90 but this airplane was perfect. It was better than any 90 or 200 I've ever flown, including the near new ones. I don't know what it was, but that thing was sweet; and for under a mill.,,,,,who needs a Baron for more??
 

CK

Well-Known Member
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Doug, you're totally right. Before I left, the company I used to work for bought a sweeeeeeet ass F90 for $975K. Usually, I wouldn't praise a 90 but this airplane was perfect. It was better than any 90 or 200 I've ever flown, including the near new ones. I don't know what it was, but that thing was sweet; and for under a mill.,,,,,who needs a Baron for more??

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I didn't like the F90 when compared to the 200. Way to sensitve, and do you think that a pilot with 200 multi could get good insurence on a King Air 200 as compared to a Baron? Or the cost, do you think that the cost to operate a Baron will be more then that of an older 200? My buddies own an MU2 and don't want to buy a jet because most of their trips are only 200 miles, so maybe this is the same for the guy buying a baron, maybe his trips are only 50 miles. Maybe he'll only ever have two people on board so all that space for the 200 would be wasted. Plus he'd have a warrenty on the Baron and could spec it out any way he wanted to.
 
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