What you've learned on your own?

Windchill

Well-Known Member
What you\'ve learned on your own?

I recently received my PPL two-and-a-half weeks ago, and obviously I don't know it all nor did I think I would.

I'm curious to hear from others what things you learned on your own and/or had to self-teach yourself about flying once you started flying on your own . . .

. . . the different aspects of flying you didn't have nailed, the secrets of how to do this or that better, etc?

Maybe we can all learn something from each other.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

Never pet a burning dog.




That was a painful lesson for everyone involved!
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

Seriously, though, the biggest thing you learn is to trust your gut instinct. If something doesn't "feel" right about a situation - it isn't right.

I've also picked up my "three strikes 'rule.'" If there are three things - that on an individual basis wouldn't neccessarily keep me from flying - that aren't quite right I change the plan or don't fly.

It's very rarely that one, big thing bites you (i.e. a wing falls off, an engine blows up, etc.) but more often than not it's a chain of smaller, less catostrophic things that lead to a bad ending.

So when I get a "chain" of three things (general rule of thumb, mind you ... could be two could be four etc.) I start looking at changing the airplane (fixing it, getting a different one, etc.) or nixing the flight.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

If you see anything blue on the fuselage of an MD-88, don't touch it, or lick it thinking it's blueberry koolaid.
 

JEP

Malko In Charge
Staff member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

I am currently doing my IR training, but during my PPL solo XC I learned to be sure of (your/and or Fix/Vor location.) I was flying from KFCM (where the VOR is located on the field) to KAXN (where the VOR is located 8 miles NE of the field). I kept tracking to the AXN VOR and was getting off of my heading. When I crossed over a major freeway that according to my VFR chart should not happen. I took a closer look. Then I found my slight mistake.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

I learned that relying on the instruments in IMC WILL help cure Spatial Disorientation (luckily, I was not alone in the cokpit at the time).

I learned that ATC cannot always see huge storms on their radar and that they WILL vector you into said storm regardless of what you say. (This falls under the category of being Pilot In Command and not flying into situations that you cannot handle).

I learned that two notches of flaps is fine for a soft-field takeoff in a Warrior... but NOT in a C150 (here, one notch will do just fine).

I learned that when a fuel tank APPEARS to be 3/4 full - get it topped off anyway (that's a long story for another time - so TRUST ME on that one).

*******
Basically, I've learned a lot about myself, what I'm capable of and what I have left to learn.

The glass isn't even 1/4 full on that one. I've got a long way to go. It's the learning that makes this stuff fun!!!


Enjoy!!

R2F
 

Ophir

Well-Known Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

I have learned you have never learned it all. There is always something out there to study, learn or improve. The PPL is your ticket to learning.
 

jetman

New Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

I can list, in no particular order a few, that i learned

SELF DISCIPLINE/////// flying has become more methodical i dont allow outside factors like turbulence.,traffic or ATC to distractme from flying the airplane at all times,not only in difficult circumstances but if im feeling' 'wonderfull' about the flight and it is easy to let the guard down, there is a part of me that is all business all the time

Developing and
establish my own limits regarding weather and other risk factors, go- no go decisions come much easier now.

The way i fly is an extencion of who im ,i learned a lot about myself[ good and bad]

How lucky im to be able to fly
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

[ QUOTE ]
What you've learned on your own?

[/ QUOTE ]

182's can't carry even a little bit of ice very well....


Students are always trying to kill me.

Stormscopes are over-rated.

Radar circa 1979 is useless (green, greener, and flashing green...wtf?!).

To check for balast in the baggage area before departing (rotate....WHOOOOOOAAAAA!!!!!!!).

172's spin pretty easily from trim stall demos.

Just because a private pilot has 200 hours doesn't mean he won't puke when you put the hood on him on a hot bumpy day.

Chicks don't dig pilots. They especially don't dig flight instructors.

Always carry essentials on long XC's (deodorant, toothbrush, etc.).

Hmm...thats all I can think of for now. Mabye I'll think of an encore for later.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

[ QUOTE ]
To check for balast in the baggage area before departing (rotate....WHOOOOOOAAAAA!!!!!!!).


[/ QUOTE ]
I'd like to hear that one.
 

sbe

Well-Known Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

how to do crosswind landings. With a 7kt crosswind component limit during my solo student days, I got a trial by fire last winter with the midwest winds, which always seem to be howling out of the west...and our runways are predominantly north/south.

how to move back and forth between planes. I did my training in a 172, then immediately checked out in an Archer, flew that all winter then freaked out when I had to fly a 172 again. Now I fly all kinds of stuff and it's no matter. Two weekends ago I flew a 150, a 172, an Archer and a Bonanza in the span of 2 days.

to expand my horizons as much as possible. Flying different planes, flying with different pilots. Doing my seaplane rating and tailwheel endorsement made a huge difference in my stick-and-rudder skills.

judgement. personal minimums. making go/no go decisions even when I have passengers I'm flying somewhere. not doing something completely crazy just because ATC asked me to. ("unable" does exist in my vocabulary)

You really can land on a 20' wide, undulating, cracked runway.

C150s really are fun.

sounding like you know what you're doing helps you get what you want from ATC.

that I really didn't know anything when I passed my PPASEL ride. I can't believe my mother and sister rode with me the next day. That's trust.

that I still really just know the tip of the iceberg.

that nothing beats flying on a CAVU calm crisp fall day.

to always check the Comm 1/Comm 2 selector (I'll refrain from telling the story)

how to properly preheat a plane (I got my private over the summer)

if you do something stupid, everyone will be watching

when flying a Cessna for the first time in a long time, duck when approaching the flaps.

that there's a reason why the right wing on a Piper has the sandpapery adhesive traction stuff for walking on.

that staying current isn't necessarily staying proficient (on all fronts)

that the utopian, little uncontrolled mom n' pop 'semi-private' fields with busy little flight schools and scores of people who just like to hang out and talk flying (and barbeque/drink beer on Wednesday nights) still exist - I'm lucky enough to do some flying out of one right now.

that I'm more hopelessly addicted to flying than I ever imagined I'd be.
 

naunga

New Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

I've only got 28 some hours, but so far I've learned...

The winds at BKL only match what ATIS reports them as for 2 minutes after the ATIS was recorded.

Your takeoff will suck if you don't have the xwind correction in on during the roll.

Bad days happen, but you just gotta get over it and keep flying.

No matter how bad you think you sound on the radio, there's always someone who sounds worse.

There truly is a reason why you want to land right on the centerline.

Never, ever pitch forward during a flare to get airspeed (oy, I had a total brain fart. My CFI asks, "why the hell did you do that" all I could say was, "I had no idea. I knew it was wrong from the get go")

Along with #6: You're CFI will think you're trying to kill him at least once.

ANR headsets work best when the ANR is switched on.

I can keep a level head even when things aren't going right.

There are some really bad pilots out there, and I'm trying really hard not to be one of them.

That if a drivers license was as hard as getting a pilots license there'd be a lot less traffic.

You can't stear a Plymouth Neon by using the pedals.


Education is the cure for ignorance.

That's all I can impart for now. I might come up with more later.

Naunga
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

[ QUOTE ]
I'd like to hear that one.

[/ QUOTE ]

I had to give a sightseeing ride to two adults and a kid. They wanted the kid to ride in the front...no biggie. Well, I only weigh 140 or so, so we had an aft CG to begin with, but within limits. Or so I thought. Turns out, the owner of the aircraft, who had been flying it solo, put 100 lbs. of ballast in the baggage area in a black bag. Well, there is always a black bag back there, full of chocks, ropes, and things like that so I thought nothing of it on preflight. After we rotated, I immediately knew something was wrong, because I'd had two adults and a kid set up the same way before, and it didn't over-rotate that badly. Brought it back around for a landing to investigate the cause, and found dumbells in the black bag with the rest of the stuff. All I had to do to flare was release some forward pressure on the yoke (not your typical 182 landing technique, lol)!
 

RiddlePilot

New Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

[ QUOTE ]
If you see anything blue on the fuselage of an MD-88, don't touch it, or lick it thinking it's blueberry koolaid.

[/ QUOTE ]

mmm...skydrol *drools*

Anyways, the biggest thing I've learned flying on my own (i.e. outside of ERAU altogether) is how to be more self-sufficient. The ERAU flight program is good, sure, but if students don't take the time to go out and hop in any airplane they can get their hands on and have some fun, then even good training doesn't mean much. I've gained more confidence and skills flying solo in MVFR (ok, ya caught me) in a Mooney in Socal than I ever would in a practice area at Riddle.
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

[ QUOTE ]
I learned that ATC cannot always see huge storms on their radar and that they WILL vector you into said storm regardless of what you say.

[/ QUOTE ]

Almost as if they're enjoying the show....


I've learned that the only way you can ever hope to decrease your personal minimums is to go out and push it right to the edge of your personal minimums. Eventually, you are going to have to exceed those said minimums, or else you're defeating the purpose (regardless of what any touchie-feelie magazine says....)

There's a fine line between taking unnecessary chances, and flying in low IFR. It's a line that has to be walked sometimes....

There's nothing more beautiful than the sun rising over an overcast cloud layer, except for the sun setting over an overcast cloud layer.

Sometimes, landings just aren't smooth...that's the way it is.

Airplanes have quite a few noises they make at night in low IFR, that they don't make in the daylight.


Gyros don't fail in VMC.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

[ QUOTE ]
Gyros don't fail in VMC.

[/ QUOTE ]

Sure they do!


I had an attitude indicator start vibrating so badly that it was unreadable. For some reason the vacuum pressure was astronomical, out of the green on the high side.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
Re: What you\'ve learned on your own?

Hah, I've been averaging one lost gyro about once every flight lately! Maybe it's because of the aerobatics...


Anyways the greatest thing I've gained since getting my license was confidence. You just plain fly better when your calm and confident.
 
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