What is your greatest piece of advice

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
I do too, but don't be that guy who gets fooled by that page due to "Garbage in, garbage out." I've seen guys manually kick the 00:45 FAR to a higher value. Now you have less extra time. Or guys who don't update the alternate fuel and show an arbitrarily higher extra time, even though your extra is less. Coming into SFO and alternate of OAK, alt fuel will show 0.3 on the fuel predict page. Paperwork shows 1.0 but not everyone updates/puts that in. When I look at that page, I always look at the left side values input first and then decide if the extra looks accurate and pertinent to our situation. I look at the fuel predict page (it's part of my approach self brief anyway) and before we condensed our briefings down, I'd always mention the extra fuel we had and how much time we could mess with. That I do even before approaching the terminal area.
Do you guys not use DIAFRIPS?
 

Der_Meister

Well-Known Member
Those that have some 121 PIC experience, what is some advice you’d give to someone now upgrading? Something you wish you’d have been more prepared for or someone would have told you before sliding into the left seat?

I bet this will get drifted but a few serious nuggets here and there would be nice :)
-You cant fix everything so just sit back and relax sometimes.

-If your FO is asking if you would like to configure you might want to think about configuring.

-dont get stuck on the small stuff
 

Raskolnikov

Well-Known Member
If the FO wants to configure earlier than you usually do and it doesn't affect things too much, just let him configure. Don't micomanage the flight control panel.... Don't use up too much of the FO's bandwidth in the normal operation of things. You might need all the FO's extra bandwidth available when you didn't expect it.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Do you guys not use DIAFRIPS?
Yeah, top hat format. That acronym sounds right except we don't have the A. DIFRIPS. I assume it's initi A versus init B? When I was FO for over 6 yrs it wasn't often to see guys plug in the alt fuel value. Once we were holding or getting a hold, guys would be good about figuring out the correct calculation. I do remember as FO asking one time to put the alt fuel proper value, and overriden by the CA as no.
As a CA now, I do it. I also carried over my CRJ days with adding flight plan alternate plus reserve on paper (say, like 3.8 + 1.5). On our paperwork, sometimes there's a difference between the box final 45 minute fuel versus the flight plan calculation even with the correct fuel factor on the Data page. I do both just for comparison purposes.
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
Yeah, top hat format. That acronym sounds right except we don't have the A. DIFRIPS. I assume it's initi A versus init B? When I was FO for over 6 yrs it wasn't often to see guys plug in the alt fuel value. Once we were holding or getting a hold, guys would be good about figuring out the correct calculation. I do remember as FO asking one time to put the alt fuel proper value, and overriden by the CA as no.
As a CA now, I do it. I also carried over my CRJ days with adding flight plan alternate plus reserve on paper (say, like 3.8 + 1.5). On our paperwork, sometimes there's a difference between the box final 45 minute fuel versus the flight plan calculation even with the correct fuel factor on the Data page. I do both just for comparison purposes.
Do you have a mandatory min fuel number in pounds?
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
We put the FOB in init B. The fuel required check is done by verifying the minTO on the paperwork to what's on the E/WD for FOB.

On my little sheet for every flight that I write the flight number on, there are two items I make sure to put down. Checklist responses. minTO fuel and the pitch trim %. I used to put SOB too but now it's in jetPack. Keep in mind all this VX stuff is going to be changing soon in a couple months to the AS dispatch/paperless system so everything will change. Their release format is entirely different than ours, and at first glance not as straightforward as ours.



Are you on the 737 or still on the A320?
AS is smart. They opened our version of MOAB and closed it right before the Dec 1st effective date of the new seniority list. No Boeing or Airbus pilot has been able to cross yet. The next bid might open after the summer. The training wouldn't be until after the summer schedule so maybe effective late this year (4th quarter?) we might see the first guys jump across.
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
We put the FOB in init B. The fuel required check is done by verifying the minTO on the paperwork to what's on the E/WD for FOB.

On my little sheet for every flight that I write the flight number on, there are two items I make sure to put down. Checklist responses. minTO fuel and the pitch trim %. I used to put SOB too but now it's in jetPack. Keep in mind all this VX stuff is going to be changing soon in a couple months to the AS dispatch/paperless system so everything will change. Their release format is entirely different than ours, and at first glance not as straightforward as ours.





AS is smart. They opened our version of MOAB and closed it right before the Dec 1st effective date of the new seniority list. No Boeing or Airbus pilot has been able to cross yet. The next bid might open after the summer. The training wouldn't be until after the summer schedule so maybe effective late this year (4th quarter?) we might see the first guys jump across.
Yeah, we don't do that.

We put in FOB, company required min for 320 or 321, and alternate fuel if it's on the release.

The dispatch numbers are always more conservative than the airplane.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
But you aren't required to put it in the box?
May modify and can be modified.


FCOM:

"If necessary, the flight crew may modify the ALTN or FINAL fuel values."

CHECK the MIN DEST FOB value on the FUEL PRED page
The MIN DEST FOB value is computed by the FMS and by default it is equals to ALTN + FINAL.
ALTN, FINAL and MIN DEST FOB can be modified by the flight crew.
At the beginning of the CRZ phase, and/or after any change of destination or alternate airport, check that the MIN DEST FOB value is meaningful. Otherwise, update the MIN DEST FOB value,as appropriate.
CHECK the DEST EFOB value on the F-PLN or FUEL PRED page
MONITOR the EFOB at destination on the F-PLN or FUEL PRED page.
If necessary, ADAPT the flight strategy.



Basically it gives leeway. I've seen guys use different techniques. Some take their flight plan ALT + RSV and throw it in the min dest fob value. Others put the ALT fuel in and just accept the FMGS computed 45 minute FAR fuel. Sometimes the paperwork may say 4.0 but the box says 3.8 for the FAR :45 value. Some guys just go with the box, some go with the paperwork for the :45 fuel.

I put the ALT fuel in. My flight plan paperwork ALT + RSV , compared to the box min dest fob (ALT + RSV) is usually almost always within 200 lbs. To be more conservative, I go with the dispatch paperwork because those are slightly higher for the :45 FAR versus the FMGS box.
 

JDean3204

Well-Known Member
Excellent replies all, everything said will be taken into consideration, for the most part :)

Here is where my mind leads me to the negative, and I will try to make this point without a TL;DR

The idea of upgrading scares me for one reason and one reason only. IF anything is out of the ordinary this day and age, the media has a field day with it. They love to sensationalize anything to keep their ratings. Example: My good friend was just involved in a "situation" in cruise that made multiple news outlets, including the national level. This situation can happen to anyone flying over certain areas during certain weather patterns, they encountered and corrected as they were trained to, yet the media still found a way to say the situation was "the ride from hell". That is honestly what keeps me up at night. I'm not saying being a pilot should be all rainbows and unicorns, but when I was a kid starting up at the sky I didn't envision myself being judged by every decision made, even the correct one that may have negative outcomes but better than if not corrected swiftly.

Flying the Q in the areas we do and the way we do is fun at times, but comes with a hell of a lot of decision making and risk mitigation. This I have learned to be extremely true in the short time I've occupied the right seat. Again, I'm not saying that I'm not capable of making good decisions, but the stress of backfire from the crucial ones weighs heavily on my mind. This lead me to think I wasn't ready for upgrade the last few months, but my current financial situation isn't sound and the raise will help me out. So at times I feel like this is the right time, but others I wish I would have more time. I do know that the anxiety of upgrading wont get any better with time, as I am confident in my airmanship and decision making and feel I can use common sense in the areas where experience may not cover.

Those of you that know me beyond these forums know that I have an incident on my record from GA flight training, it is something I have never let go. So it amplifies my fears at times, causing me to hesitate to move forward with career ladder progression. Maybe it is a confidence issue, or maybe it is normal to feel this way, I'm not too sure. All I know is I don't want the stress of upgrading and sitting in the left seat to turn me into a fearful pilot because I'm afraid of the what ifs. I understand every flight is a risk, that is known throughout the industry and was beaten into us from primary flight school. I just hope I can continue to enjoy the job and not dread going to work on those challenging days because CNN or FOX or the local KPT whatever is waiting for the next hiccup to blast way out of proportion.

I truly believe my GA incident made me a better pilot, it removed any attitude mirroring that of a macho attitude and sternly taught me that aviation can be unforgiving at times. I talk about this incident with friends, fellow aviators and most importantly those that say that nothing will happen to them because of their excellent skills as they judge those that have made mistakes. I disclose it during interviews, I don’t have any checkride failures to accompany it yet so it hasn’t seemed to impede my progress as it’s an example of a great learning experience. However, during those days that challenge our pilot skills like those “sporty” scenarios where most appreciate the challenge, my mind starts playing the mistake I have in my past, and the media trying to turn me into a Marvin Renslow type that others will sit back and say, wtf is he doing in the left seat??!

So maybe this was TL;DR, but just thought I’d share what I’m thinking about as I’ve already hit the button to upgrade. Trying to be relaxed and concentrate on the tasks at hand, but the racing mind can jack with any positivity I try to keep flowing.
 
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jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
Excellent replies all, everything said will be taken into consideration, for the most part :)

Here is where my mind leads me to the negative, and I will try to make this point without a TL;DR

The idea of upgrading scares me for one reason and one reason only. IF anything is out of the ordinary this day and age, the media has a field day with it. They love to sensationalize anything to keep their ratings. Example: My good friend was just involved in a "situation" in cruise that made multiple news outlets, including the national level. This situation can happen to anyone flying over certain areas during certain weather patterns, they encountered and corrected as they were trained to, yet the media still found a way to say the situation was "the ride from hell". That is honestly what keeps me up at night. I'm not saying being a pilot should be all rainbows and unicorns, but when I was a kid starting up at the sky I didn't envision myself being judged by every decision made, even the correct one that may have negative outcomes but better than if not corrected swiftly.

Flying the Q in the areas we do and the way we do is fun at times, but comes with a hell of a lot of decision making and risk mitigation. This I have learned to be extremely true in the short time I've occupied the right seat. Again, I'm not saying that I'm not capable of making good decisions, but the stress of backfire from the crucial ones weighs heavily on my mind. This lead me to think I wasn't ready for upgrade the last few months, but my current financial situation isn't sound and the raise will help me out. So at times I feel like this is the right time, but others I wish I would have more time. I do know that the anxiety of upgrading wont get any better with time, as I am confident in my airmanship and decision making and feel I can use common sense in the areas where experience may not cover.

Those of you that know me beyond these forums know that I have an incident on my record from GA flight training, it is something I have never let go. So it amplifies my fears at times, causing me to hesitate to move forward with career ladder progression. Maybe it is a confidence issue, or maybe it is normal to feel this way, I'm not too sure. All I know is I don't want the stress of upgrading and sitting in the left seat to turn me into a fearful pilot because I'm afraid of the what ifs. I understand every flight is a risk, that is known throughout the industry and was beaten into us from primary flight school. I just hope I can continue to enjoy the job and not dread going to work on those challenging days because CNN or FOX or the local KPT whatever is waiting for the next hiccup to blast way out of proportion...
Know the book, fly the book. If you do that, nobody can ever come after you.

Simple, really.

And those compass guys will be fine.
 

JDean3204

Well-Known Member
Know the book, fly the book. If you do that, nobody can ever come after you.

Simple, really.

And those compass guys will be fine.
Im currently reading a minimum of one chapter twice a night from both the FOM and FSM, I sprinkle a little QRH in there as well. I figured if I do that, when ground starts here in 6-7 weeks I’ll know right where the answer should be if I don’t know the answer. It’s amazing the things you seem to remember or realize after combing through the writing a few times.
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
Im currently reading a minimum of one chapter twice a night from both the FOM and FSM, I sprinkle a little QRH in there as well. I figured if I do that, when ground starts here in 6-7 weeks I’ll know right where the answer should be if I don’t know the answer. It’s amazing the things you seem to remember or realize after combing through the writing a few times.
The FOM is the captains book. FO's probably look at the captain as being the one that has to know how to fly the plane best, but the FOM is what the captain really needs to know to be successful.

I've never understood why some airlines have upgrades read the QRH for upgrade. It's a reference document, not anything to have memorized.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Yeah...we do everything you're talking about at the gate before we leave. Surprised you guys don't.
Does Azure use time or do you guys insert hard values for your alternate and final fuel or just time? I can’t remember if that page is the same on your Honeywell boxes. Ungh, Honeywell blows.

(Hilariously, I know the engineer from Honeywell that designed that system, he’s retired in Scottsdale and his wife is in my exercise group)
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Know your RTO criteria cold. You’ll be doing a lot in the sim.
Why? I don't think my upgrade program had "a lot" of RTOs. We did a couple in the sims but definitely not "a lot." I actually shudder at training pilots to reject a lot. I think you work today at the regional I was at and back then 11/12 yrs ago, it had the highest rate of rejected TOs for any regional back then. Guys were rejecting for all sorts of stupid stuff back then. I think there was even one regional where it became an interview question, what would you do if the guy next to you didn't have his shoulder harness on above 80 knots? I cannot believe somebody would high speed reject for something like that! That's exactly what you want :sarcasm: when you forget a shoulder harness: max braking attempt to bring the aircraft to a stop, how's that going to go with no shoulder harness?
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Does Azure use time or do you guys insert hard values for your alternate and final fuel or just time? I can’t remember if that page is the same on your Honeywell boxes. Ungh, Honeywell blows.

(Hilariously, I know the engineer from Honeywell that designed that system, he’s retired in Scottsdale and his wife is in my exercise group)
When we choose to modify, here we do so by inserting the fuel value. But if it's ETOPS (IIRC) then you put the % value for rte reserve (i think 11%) and final time itself (I think 30 minutes).
 

Jordan93

Well-Known Member
Why? I don't think my upgrade program had "a lot" of RTOs. We did a couple in the sims but definitely not "a lot." I actually shudder at training pilots to reject a lot. I think you work today at the regional I was at and back then 11/12 yrs ago, it had the highest rate of rejected TOs for any regional back then. Guys were rejecting for all sorts of stupid stuff back then. I think there was even one regional where it became an interview question, what would you do if the guy next to you didn't have his shoulder harness on above 80 knots? I cannot believe somebody would high speed reject for something like that! That's exactly what you want :sarcasm: when you forget a shoulder harness: max braking attempt to bring the aircraft to a stop, how's that going to go with no shoulder harness?
We still have a lot of issues doing RTOs for absolutely moronic reasons. It’s still a problem. In the past few months, we had a crew abort in LGA at 120kts for EFIS COMP MON
 
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