What do you love about flying?

Snow

'Not a new member'
Just as a follow up from 'Lost the love?' I guess some of you just see flying as a job, but what about you out there who enjoy their job? What about the job makes all the troubles worthwhile in the end?
 

Snow

'Not a new member'
Oh come now! You telling me all you guys who get paid to fly don't like your jobs?
 

Mavmb

Well-Known Member
To be honest, I've just always loved the view! That's one thing about the little planes, they stay low enough plenty slow enough to enjoy the view.
 

BoDEAN

New Member
I love leaving all my worries, life's problems, etc, on the ground below me. I feel like I am away from all of the everyday bs in life when I am up in the sky =)
 

Eagle

New Member
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Oh come now! You telling me all you guys who get paid to fly don't like your jobs?

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I had the conversation the other night. I am pretty much afraid of flying.

Not terrified (that is only when I fly over water) I am afraid that there is going to go wrong, very wrong. EVERY SINGLE TIME I FLY.

A friend of mine (another LJ guy) said, that is why you are a good pilot, It is a good trait to be on edge.

And again, love the job? nope, jobs are jobs.

The question was asked and it pops up every now and again on here, something to the point of;

If money wasn't the issue, you won lottery etc, would you still fly for XYZ airlines or whatever your goal/current position is.

and the people who are flying for money, without exception, said.

No way buh bye.

and all the folks, again without exception, that are trying to land their first job with an air carrier, or still a student pilot all said. I'd keep working for acme airlines.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
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I had the conversation the other night. I am pretty much afraid of flying.

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That's really interesting... I guess it keeps you humble and "on edge" as you said.

Is it the heights that you fear?
 

Snow

'Not a new member'
A job isn't always just a job. I know plenty of people who enjoy their jobs. Maybe not you, I guess your just one of those people who isn't happy unless their sitting on their ass doing nothing. That sorta stuff bores me.

So you don't like being a pilot AND your scared of flying?! Geez Eagle are you sure your in the right industry?

Hell maybe I'll just be one of those rare pilots who enjoys their job! I love technical things, I like planes, I like driving, so it seems logical I'll like 'driving' a plane for a living.

I pity you people who go through life doing a job you don't like, I mean what's the point of that? I'd rather work at a job that I like and earn a little less than make a big salary and be miserable, but hey maybe to some of you money is more important that anything else.
 

vipermcg

New Member
I'm not sure if there's any truth in this, but I once heard that some airline pilots are so used to flying the plane that they become afraid when they have to fly as passengers.
 

drumminpilot

Well-Known Member
I don't have a job yet as a pilot, but I'll tell you that in my book, there is nothing cooler than when you pop through the tops of the clouds, and there is nothing above but an awesome bright sun.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
Absolutely NOTHING wrong with a bit of fear when flying. I experience it pretty much every time I fly alone - and I'm glad I do because it keeps me on my toes.

I'm CONSTANTLY thinking of emergency out procedures - looking for a place to land should the engine go south, watching the engine guages in my scan....etc.

I would HOPE that each and every one of you -as pilots - would put aside your ego and admit that there's an eliment of flying that scares the be-jesus out of you and THAT is what makes you a good pilot.

It's the guys that say <font color="red">"I'm not scared of SH*T because I know what I'm doing"</font> that you end up reading about in the papers because they got complacent.

As for the original question of :"What do yo love about flying?"

1. The view
2. The challenge
 

Eagle

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
flyitup [ QUOTE ]
I am pretty much afraid of flying.

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Is it the heights that you fear?

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No, not really I *am* afraid of heights, but there is no sensation of heights (in my mind) when you fly, it is more of the *what if's*, and some of it is based on experience, I have had more than one in-flight fire, one engine failure (not to total loss, thankfully) Ice, Ice and More Ice. I have been in a spin south of Salt Lake city, with ice on a Cherokee in Solid IMC BELOW MVA. So I have a much more respectful fear as I approach flying. Plus now that I am bopping along at 410, the added extreme cold, Cold soaking the airplane, rapid depressurization, and all the things that go along with it are continually on my mind.

Here is a good example. In the LJ and the CJ, if you have a rapid depressurize of the cabin, the issue is to, obviously, to get as low as you can as fast as you can. well the ACM that keeps the cabin pressurized is a "direct drive" function of the engines, so how do you go down? you pull the power, you pull the power you speed up the cabin pressure air loss because you are shutting down the ACM, so you need to get even lower.. Lower faster, yeah dropping 20-30,000 feet ASAP is a ton of fun. NOT. it is these types of things that are always on my mind.


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Snow: A job isn't always just a job. I know plenty of people who enjoy their jobs. Maybe not you, I guess your just one of those people who isn't happy unless their sitting on their ass doing nothing. That sorta stuff bores me..

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Well you are so lucky that work doesn't bore you, for a number of reasons, especially since your profile says:[ QUOTE ]
looking around for a non-degree flight school. I think my ultimate dream would be to fly 747s for United but I would be happy flying with any of the major airlines.

[/ QUOTE ] Because not having a degree means you will need to work, well a hell of a lot longer to achieve the same as those of us who have worked, and made the effort to achieve a higher education. and the dream you have, (which will remain a dream) of flying for a major airline, is unreachable without a degree. Granted you may go to another school of higher education, and learn to fly as well, but in the short term, you may want to do an inventory of your aviation skills and employment history before you spout on and on how others are messed up because we understand the difference between **WORK** and play. Never Work when you are playing and never play when you are working.


[ QUOTE ]
So you don't like being a pilot AND your scared of flying?! Geez Eagle are you sure your in the right industry?

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Yes I sure am, please tell me more about your aviation experiences, and why I am out of line. Please tell us child tell us!

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Hell maybe I'll just be one of those rare pilots who enjoys their job! I love technical things, I like planes, I like driving, so it seems logical I'll like 'driving' a plane for a living.

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And Maybe you will be one of those people who vapor locks and is unable to fly due to paralyzing fear, or one of those people who can not pass a medical, or one of those people who thinks they are bulletproof and kills themselves and others because they like driving.

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I pity you people who go through life doing a job you don't like, I mean what's the point of that? I'd rather work at a job that I like and earn a little less than make a big salary and be miserable, but hey maybe to some of you money is more important that anything else.

[/ QUOTE ]

This is the funniest thing I have read in years. Having just retired from Twenty Years in the military, Are you even twenty years old yet... no I didn't think so, jeeze... I mean have you ever even kissed a girl?

Bwahahahahahh! tell you what, when you stop popping zits and start shaving, give me a call, then I will continue to berate you . at this point it isn't even worth the trouble, ....
 

naunga

New Member
I read a letter in a recent article of Plane &amp; Pilot.

This guy put fear of flying (as a pilot) like this:

You have fear, but as you build experience that fear changes and really shouldn't be called fear. He suggests calling it "professional concern". For example you might say: "I had a fear of stalls until I spent sometime practicing them, but now I have a professional concern that keeps me aware of the danger of stalls."

I personally can 100% relate to that idea. I'm alway concerned that when I'm driving down the highway that I could get in a wreak, but I'm not afraid of having a wreak (not that I want to get in one). I figure if I were afraid I wouldn't even drive.

Just my two cents.

Naunga.
 

Eagle

New Member
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I'll go with that. Good post Naunga

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Yeah what he said about what he said...
 

davetheflyer

New Member
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Not terrified (that is only when I fly over water)

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I can sympathize. The 31R approach to JFK from the south is out over the ocean at 2000 MSL. Especially at night, it always makes me a little uneasy, even with two dependable engines.

Similarly, instructing at FSI, some of our lessons (especially in step 5) were scheduled at night. The syllabus called for maneuvers such as steep turns and engine outs to be practiced in the PA44. If, as was common, clouds were over land, we pretty much had to practice over the water. Dark night, no visual reference. Anybody in their right mind would be uneasy.

Still, I don't consider myself afraid of flying as much as having a healthy respect for what can happen.

Personally, I love everything about it except for the long trips that keep me away from my wife for too long. I like the view, especially on the super clear days and nights when you can see forever. I like to see the runway lights as you break out of the clouds on final at 200 AGL. I like the feeling of accomplishment after a good landing. I like the feeling of cameraderie with other pilots. I like the fact that in a couple of hours, I can be halfway across the country, then back before supper. I also like the way that people look at me with respect and admiration as I walk through the terminal. (Even the little kids that think I'm a cop or movie theater worker.
) This is the best job in the world, even though on some days I had rather stay home. Even if I sometimes complain, it definitely beats working for a living.
 

naunga

New Member
I'm not a pro (yet), but what I love about flying has been expressed already by others. Popping through the clouds and finding a beautiful sunny day on top and leaving all my cares etc. on the ground.

But there's another reason. When I fly, that's all I'm doing. Flying. I'm not thinking about the billion things that dart through my consciousness every second I'm on the ground. I finally get some peace in my head, and for a time can become totally caught up in one thought: Fly.

I get this too when I drive, but not as profound. Also when I drive, I invariably get stopped in traffic. This doesn't happen 4500' AGL (at least I hope it won't).

That's what I love about flying.

Cheers.

Naunga
 

Freight Guy

New Member
I have a fear of heights as well, in fact this fear is what prompted my first flight lesson, I still have my fear of heights but as with Eagle it doesn't affect me in an airplane. What I love about flying is that it allows me to do the things I want to on my time off, pays my bills, and gives me a lot of job satisfaction. Those three things mean an awful lot to me, when I started out in this industry the only thing that mattered to me was flying, and in many cases that's what it takes the first few years to become established, after a while you begin to want more out of life ( love, financial stability, hobbies, etc... ) the same as you would in any profession.
Aviation is the same as any job, at first you may use it to define who you are, in time it gradually shifts to ( what you do ) and you tend to define who you are by what you choose to do for yourself and others on your own time to make your mark on this world.
I like your enthusiasm Snow, and am sure you'll do just fine, work hard to accomplish your professional goals, but be sure to keep your eyes open to the other things in life that will make it even more enjoyable.

ok, need coffee now, might have to come back and edit some of this if it comes off sounding too silly!
 

carlos

Well-Known Member
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ok, need coffee now, might have to come back and edit some of this if it comes off sounding too silly!

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Well said. Your comments too, Eagle.

I've been working for 19 years now in a field (IT) that I loved when I started out in it. It's had its ups and downs, with some assignments an absolute blast working with great people, and others where I would rather have been cutting grass for a living. But the general trend is towards work is work, and play is play. The two do not overlap and a professional will not confuse one for the other.

Enthusiasm for a job is great and consider yourself lucky if you can keep it throughout your career. Never forget, however, that work is how you make a living and your life's purpose should be independent of that. They may seem to coincide at times, but that doesn't make them the same.
 

A300Capt

Freight Dawg
No, I don't "love" flying anymore. I never thought growing up and dreaming about flying for the airlines that I'd ever say that but times have changed and so have I.

If you haven't "been there, done that" and are just starting out then you just wouldn't understand and it would be pointless to try and explain it. While it still beats flying a desk in some isolated cubicle somewhere, I can't say that I look forward to it everyday, nor do I think about it on my days off except when I get close to recurrent training.

What I won't miss about flying in no particular order:

-Early 3AM departures and 15+ hr days or sleeping during the day.
-Sleeping in hotels, especially during the day.
-Dealing with crew scheduling and contingency.
-Reschedules, commercial deadheading, delays and mechanicals.
-Union/management infighting and power trips
-Stress of recurrent training and checkrides
-6 month physicals
-Being away from home and missing important family functions.
-Scaring myself or my f/o after a particularly rough night of flying.

What I will miss:
-The people I've worked with and friendships I've made along the way...priceless!
-The satisfaction and challenge of "kissing the concrete" with 400,000lbs of aluminum after a low ILS approach/non-precision approach and/or windy day/night.
-Speaking with young people who have a genuine interest in aviation and becoming pilots.
-The money (let's not forget that!)
-Trying to be perfect at something you can never really be perfect at but still try each time only to find out you've run out of time at age 60.
-That brown uniform...kidding!
 
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