Western Global?

Shock-Diamonds

Well-Known Member
Ok, so I currently work for a large regional, but both location and pay have me thinking about other opportunities. I have sent out a few applications out of curiosity and one of the companies that got back to me was Western Global Airlines in FL. That location sounds good to me, I was just wondering if anyone had any experience with their operation, pay scale or any other information that could be useful?
 

Some Dude

Well-Known Member
I haven't been there since May of 2016, but when I left they were working 4 on, 4 off and 12 hour shifts. Estero is pricey, as is Bonita Springs and Naples. You can find some affordable places to live in Fort Myers.
 

Shock-Diamonds

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the responses! Did you enjoy working there? Are you able to compare the work day to what a regional may be like? Oh, and I'm guessing there aren't flight benefits?
 

Shock-Diamonds

Well-Known Member
Well if you can list jump seat than that is still a travel option! I guess I am just curious to how the typical day of planning and following might differ from a typical airline dispatch job. Sounds like a solid company though, and I appreciate the responses!
 

Kmacmillan

Well-Known Member
Well if you can list jump seat than that is still a travel option! I guess I am just curious to how the typical day of planning and following might differ from a typical airline dispatch job. Sounds like a solid company though, and I appreciate the responses!
Always a good question for an interview. Give it a try.


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Some Dude

Well-Known Member
Well if you can list jump seat than that is still a travel option! I guess I am just curious to how the typical day of planning and following might differ from a typical airline dispatch job. Sounds like a solid company though, and I appreciate the responses!
The flight volume is a lot lower than at a regional. But you're also not using canned routes, so you can spend a lot more time building your routes. Sometimes the customer doesn't get an overflight permit that would be advantageous to you, so you have to route around a certain airspace. Their aircraft do not have ACARS in them, so when you're doing re-clears you will be using Stockholm Radio(or Arinc) on the HF, which is nearly impossible to hear/understand in places like central Africa, for example. As a smaller operation, you're also involved in a lot more aspects of the operation than just flight planning and flight following. You will be talking directly to angry customers when a flight is delayed or when payload is bumped because a more distant alternate is required. Company policy also dictates that you do a phone briefing with the Captain before every flight. As with about anything there is definitely good and bad. But you will absolutely get some new experiences compared to the regionals.
 

Some Dude

Well-Known Member
No ACARS?!? So, either B43 or straight fuel reserves as far as I’m concerned.

Trying to maintain operational control/issuing a reclear message via HF Radio and a phone patch...yeah....I’m not thinking that.


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It's definitely the wild west of dispatching. Here is an example of one time we couldn't reach the aircraft via Stockholm and the Captain had to stop at the reclear destination.

Body discovered after BLOOD dripped from US plane was a 'stowaway' | Daily Mail Online

Notice the first bullet point says it made an unscheduled stop in Harare. Then it goes on to quote a company spokesman calling it a routine fuel stop. Then later stating the captain tried to land in Mozambique and was turned away. Dead bodies and pallets of cash aside, this is how this type of flying/dispatching goes on a consistent basis.
 
D

Deleted member 27505

Guest
It's definitely the wild west of dispatching. Here is an example of one time we couldn't reach the aircraft via Stockholm and the Captain had to stop at the reclear destination.

Body discovered after BLOOD dripped from US plane was a 'stowaway' | Daily Mail Online

Notice the first bullet point says it made an unscheduled stop in Harare. Then it goes on to quote a company spokesman calling it a routine fuel stop. Then later stating the captain tried to land in Mozambique and was turned away. Dead bodies and pallets of cash aside, this is how this type of flying/dispatching goes on a consistent basis.
When you got lawyers, guns, and money, youdoneeeed no steenkin' deespatch.
 

Prino

Well-Known Member
It's definitely the wild west of dispatching. Here is an example of one time we couldn't reach the aircraft via Stockholm and the Captain had to stop at the reclear destination.

Body discovered after BLOOD dripped from US plane was a 'stowaway' | Daily Mail Online

Notice the first bullet point says it made an unscheduled stop in Harare. Then it goes on to quote a company spokesman calling it a routine fuel stop. Then later stating the captain tried to land in Mozambique and was turned away. Dead bodies and pallets of cash aside, this is how this type of flying/dispatching goes on a consistent basis.
Not the best of places to have filed as an alternate. Also the blood wasn’t dripping on the ground as much as it was just dried and streaked down the side of the plane. And there wasn’t suitcases of money it was several pallets worth
 

dispatchguy

Well-Known Member
Having worked at a scumbag nonsked that did mil pax charters - you simply cant beat the experience. Yes, the workload was heavy working three or four flights over several of the worlds oceans simultaneously, Stockholm radio calls that sound like talking via the moon ("we cant put the call through without a credit card number").

We had a DoD inspection where the DoD recorded NOTHING. Not one gig on anything. Either our poop didnt stink (NOT), or they didnt look. I worked our first CRAF mission through Chinese airspace.

You'll work flights to places you definitely never heard of, but if I hadn't been at the scumbag nonsked, I wouldnt be at my purple box hauler as our in-house ETOPS standards guy.
 
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