Want a career change but I have an unusual problem

Ravi Singh

New Member
Hi Everyone,
I am new to this website and I wanted to ask a question about changing careers. I just graduated from a UK university with a bachelors in computer science. I have just started a career in IT but I just realized that I need to get into piloting because I always wanted to. I have researched a few flight schools and I plan to start this year. My problem is that I am currently working here on a employer sponsored work visa and I don't know how the legal stuff is going to work out if I change careers. Can anybody shed some light on this?

Thank you
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
If you want to be a working pilot in the US, then you need the right to work here. Green card or work visa. I don't think many, if any airlines are sponsoring work visas for pilots so I imagine you'll need the green card.
 

nocturnalaviator

Family Man
Hi Everyone,
I am new to this website and I wanted to ask a question about changing careers. I just graduated from a UK university with a bachelors in computer science. I have just started a career in IT but I just realized that I need to get into piloting because I always wanted to. I have researched a few flight schools and I plan to start this year. My problem is that I am currently working here on a employer sponsored work visa and I don't know how the legal stuff is going to work out if I change careers. Can anybody shed some light on this?

Thank you
Welcome aboard! GREAT! I'm a pilot who just realized i need a job in IT because I hear QOL/pay is better! Lets brain pick! LOL No seriously you've got a lot of help here. :)


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 

Shiftace

Low Time Private Pilot
Aah! Another one in the same boat as me.

I assume you are on the H1B visa (since you are working in IT) and assuming you are in the US. As someone else pointed out, green card is the preferred way to go. Training however can be done on any visa. As long as you do not violate any visa rules you are good.

Having a job gives you the advantage of paying as you go. So take it easy and have fun along the way.
 

scotland laddy

Well-Known Member
Hi Everyone,
I am new to this website and I wanted to ask a question about changing careers. I just graduated from a UK university with a bachelors in computer science. I have just started a career in IT but I just realized that I need to get into piloting because I always wanted to. I have researched a few flight schools and I plan to start this year. My problem is that I am currently working here on a employer sponsored work visa and I don't know how the legal stuff is going to work out if I change careers. Can anybody shed some light on this?

Thank you
Will your company sponsor you for a Green Card? It is worth a shot in asking. However, it will take about 7 years to get especially since you are on an H1-B Visa. Any chance you can get a job in the UK and come back here in a year on an L-1 Visa? That is a quicker option and your company can fast track you for a Green Card.

Just some food for thought.
 

Frederick Obermueller

Well-Known Member
I've been in IT since I graduated from college in 1976. I worked mostly as a contractor for BellLabs/AT&T and know many foreigners on work visas (1 from England but most from SouthEast asia). Until you get your green card you will be a virtual indentured servant subject to the whims of your job shop. They will get 1/2 - 6/10 of your salary and you will have to take care of other workers they bring over on interviews. If you try to change jobs you'll be sent home. I know all about watching your position on the green card eligibility list and counting off the weeks until you get the card.
That said you should know that unlike aviation where technology changes at a snail's pace and once you learn to shoot a precision ILS approach you are set, in IT you only have 5 years until your college experience is considered outdated. 35 years is the limit to become an airline copilot but 27 years you are pushing it in IT. Also remember that only 20% of IT graduates are still in the field by age 40.

I recommend you contact any friends in the US who are in IT and get leads. (as they say it is networkorkin) Moster.,com and dice.com are also starting points. Once you get into the US get your private pilot license, by a Cessna 150/Chreokk140, etc and start building time). It is still much cheaper to fly in US than Europe.
Although there are those who would argue that ownership is too expensive it is easier to put 5 gallons in you C150 and take it up on a spur of the moment than to schedule the plane 3 weeks in advance and shell out $100

good luck
let me know if your ever near N40
 

Autothrust Blue

"I’d make a suggestion but you won’t listen”
Welcome aboard! GREAT! I'm a pilot who just realized i need a job in IT because I hear QOL/pay is better! Lets brain pick! LOL No seriously you've got a lot of help here. :)


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
No, it isn't, but I'm glad you think so. (QOL anyway.)
 

NickH

Dank Meme
Although there are those who would argue that ownership is too expensive it is easier to put 5 gallons in you C150 and take it up on a spur of the moment than to schedule the plane 3 weeks in advance and shell out $100
The downside being that without a Green Card or citizenship you are not permitted to own a US registered airplane. It is possible to start a corporation which then owns the airplane, and this is commonly done by airplane owners who base N reg airplanes in the UK, but adds complexity and expense.

It's amazing the pitfalls that US laws will put in the way for no reason.
 

Frederick Obermueller

Well-Known Member
I didn't know that about ownership but incorporating is pretty easy. If you registered the plane home land security would come knocking? I sold my Apache last year and it is still,in my name. Alot of planes are bought and sold without being registered. This is because of taxes, Connecticut would track flight plans and charge sales tax to planes entering the state. Florida would charge tax on planes that visited too long. New Jersey had tried to tax the Apache but because it never left texas I didn't have to.
But seriously incorporate (should cost less than 500) or find a relative / friend to hold the registration for you
 
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