Visiting Delta Academy

sorrygottarunway

Well-Known Member
Hey Folks,

I'm gonna be heading down to FL to see DCA on wednesday the 15th, on one of their free tickets they sent to me. I just graduated college, and have a PPL, working on the IFR rating.

Anything that you could recommend to a lowly PPL like me to ask when I go on the tour? Anyone that would be willing to meet me?

I'm already very optimistic about the visit. My Admissions person has been very helpful and accomadating with the arrangements and telling me what I can get out of the Academy (basically, I am looking for a place where I can go crazy: fly all the time, study flying, study FAA regs, talk about flying, learn how to do it all safely). I'm not too interested in the living accomadations (although it would be nice to see what they have) since my primary interest is just working hard + enjoying aviation with others.

If you want to email me, feel free to: b.ratchford@gmx.de
 

blee256

Well-Known Member
Make sure you dress nice. per their dress code. I got to fly first class on the way there. It was great. Go in with an open mind. The facilities arent the newest. but they are fine. If you choose to go the DCA, and instruct for them, the connection to the airlines should be really helpful. Good luck, and if joney is your admission's rep, tell her i said hi.

-Brian Lee
 

sorrygottarunway

Well-Known Member
yep, Joney is the one. I had Patrick Levans before, but that was in college, and I never got the feeling he was really interested in what I had to say, or my concerns about financing. All he started with was "Brendan, if you really want to be a professional pilot [insert marketing here]"

I requested a women instead, and have been very happy to speak to Joney so far, she has been quite helpful.

I have an airline uniform for when I right-seat on some of the charter flights at my flight school... if I took off my wings, and epaulets, would this qualify?

In anycase, shirt/tie for the flight down. Its a work week for me, so no problem wearing business attire.
 

blee256

Well-Known Member
Are you switching from a different flight school? What rating are you planning on getting from DCA?

For my flight down there I wore khakis and a dress shirt. I think pilot shirts look weird without the epulets (sp?). That peice of paper they mailed you should explain the dress code.

-Brian
 

sorrygottarunway

Well-Known Member
Just got back from my trip last week...

I was quite impressed with the school- it seems that the training here is comparable to anywhere else, and has a great support staff. I have been reading posts at this forum, and each school seems to get bashed in some way or another. What my conclusion at DCA was- if you bust your butt, don't become a thorn in anyone's side, make great contacts, maintain a positive attitude, you WILL be a success, just like anywhere else. If you slack off, you WILL fail, and feel that your money is wasted. This also brings to light something I learned early in my primary training- you get out of a program, what you put into it in man hours, not $$.

What I observed down there were many flight students supremely focused on safe flying- from the classrooms to the sim room, I saw very dedicated people helping each other, working through sim scenarios, and a bustling dispatch area. No screw-arounds. Yeah, the place is expensive, but I believe that for the boot-camp type style without the military involvement, the price is not so bad. I will be refining my conclusions in the upcoming weeks as to where I'll be in 2004.

I'll probably be entering DCA with a fresh instrument rating, ready for battle. I know there is much skepticism about the FL schools, like "which place can make me the most successful pilot" but the answer really lies within one's own character.
 

Captain_Bob

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I know there is much skepticism about the FL schools, like "which place can make me the most successful pilot" but the answer really lies within one's own character.

[/ QUOTE ] Bingo! You just hit the nail on the head!

No matter where you decide to go... remember that, and you'll do well anywhere!


Good luck,

Bob
 

AV8R_N8

Well-Known Member
Hello

I have also been looking into going to some airline academy to get some very structured training. I live in Florida and have been looking at Regional Airline Academy, Delta Airline Academy, and Pan Am. I’m not sure which one to go to at the moment. Anyone have any past experience with any of these places. I have my Multi Commercial Instrument right now, and just need to finish my CFI/CFII/MEI and start building time by instructing. I would also like to get a Jet Transition course completed also to prepare me. Thanks
 

SJFLYER

Well-Known Member
I am in the same shoes that you are and after lots of research I decided to attend the Dec class at DCA. All the academies do a good job training you to be a cfi but at the end of the day only one school can significantly increase your chances of getting to the regionals 18 months after graduation. And you get a CRJ prep course free to help you cruise during initial training. The worse case scenario is that you don't get hired as a cfi at DCA and then you are in the same boat that you would be at, if you did your cfi course somewhere else. Most academies have a very long waiting list to start instructing.

Good luck,

PS Watch out for pan am they charge 2K for dropping out of a course.
 

rausda27

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
but at the end of the day only one school can significantly increase your chances of getting to the regionals 18 months after graduation.

[/ QUOTE ]

The only thing that will increase your chances of getting to the regionals is hard work, perseverance, and the appropriate qualifications..take all the marketing with a grain of salt...
 

Kristie

Mama Bear....
Staff member
Nope - not an expert at all... just that all marketing (pertaining to anything sales), whether aviation or retail or restaurant etc has to be taken with a big grain of salt... cuz the purpose of marketing is to get you in the door - doesn't mean their product is bad, good or indifferent, that's dependent on how "you" take the information that's given after the marketing has gotten you in the door....

to give a good analogy - marketing is the lure on the end of the fishing line, whether or not you take the bite is up to you and whether or not you spit it out and go for the next lure or get hauled into the boat is also up to you...but take any marketing for what it's worth - it gets you in the door...
 

Wannabe2

New Member
Very well put Kristie, I come from an advertising/marketing background and you are exactly on point.
 
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