Twin-Engine Centerline Thrust Question?

lapilot

New Member
Does anyone know how the FAA, or airlines for that matter, determine the quality of multi-engine time in regards to centerline jet thrust vs. an offset twin prop? Also, if someone were to have time in a twin-engine jet aircraft (that was centerline), would it hold the same weight (or be better) than having offset thrust from a twin prop?

Thanks
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
I doubt it would carry the same weight as a "traditional" twin simply because a) it's perceived, generally, to be "easier to fly" b) the FAA even sets it apart in that if you get a multi rating in a centerline thrust aircraft you are limited to centerline aircraft and your multi-engine privileges do not extend to traditional twins.

Now, in an interview you can pretty much spin anything any way you want. Whether or not you're good enough to convince the interviewer that your way of thinking is correct is a completely seperate issue.
 

aloft

New Member
Multi-turbine will always be more valuable than multi-piston regardless of the centerline thrust issue. Besides, pretty much the only way you're gonna have a multiengine jet with centerline thrust is in a tactical aircraft of some sort, and such military time always carries a premium in the eyes of the airlines.

Think about it: a fighter pilot with only 1000 hrs of F-16 or F-15 time can jump straight to the majors (if they were hiring), even tho he/she/it may not meet TT requirements for most regionals. Why? It's all turbine PIC.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
As long as your certificate doesn't include "Multi-Engine Land - Centerline Thrust Only", it doesn't matter that much.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
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Think about it: a fighter pilot with only 1000 hrs of F-16 or F-15 time can jump straight to the majors (if they were hiring), even tho he/she/it may not meet TT requirements for most regionals. Why? It's all turbine PIC.

[/ QUOTE ]

Simple. Quality and complexity of flight time. Quantity isn't always all that important. The mil pilot gets more out of 1000 hours of F-15 time than the average GA pilot gets out of 2000 hours of 172/PA-44 time. Most guys getting on with a regional are coming from CFI flying with piston ME time. Not a bad thing to have at all, mind you, but no training in advanced systems/aircraft. That being said, I'd still think that meeting the airline's minimums would be only fair for emplyment consideration.

That's just the hours issue. I'd take personality into account a lot too. But that's me.

Does United still advertise 350TT as their minimum requirement? I remember it being that.
 

Mike Lewis

Shadow Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]

That's just the hours issue. I'd take personality into account a lot too. But that's me.

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Plus the risk factor. You know an ex-military pilot is pretty low risk with regards to law violations, financial problems, etc. When I separated from the military they suggested listing that you had a security clearance on a resume for precisely that reason.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Yup, the airlines prefer military pilots because of OCS, UPT and experience in high performance jets.
 
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