Trucker to Airline Pilot

Yetti

Active Member
CDLs are a premium since nobody can pass the wizz quizz so you should be able to take some risks with days off here and there to go flying when the weather is good. Get after the ground school.
 

ComplexHiAv8r

Well-Known Member
Meh. I think I’ve come across more pilots with engineering degrees than almost any other degree (other than aviation specific degrees of course). Pretty much every test pilot and astronaut has an engineering/science degree as well.

As a former flight instructor, my young engineering students were awesome. Very good at studying and knocking out the other monotonous stuff that hold most people back. The flying skills ranged from average to well above average. I don’t recall anything below that.

I bet the original comment stems from dealing with a couple of older career changers (or students) that happened to have engineering degrees. The issue here of course is the older career changer. They aren’t always problematic, but they are more often than not.
So being an older engineer career changer is a problem? 8)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Jordan93

Well-Known Member
Didn’t look through the entire thread but if no one mentioned it, make sure you can hold a first class medical. You don’t want to spend on all your money on flight training just to find out you can’t get a medical.
 

fholbert

Mod's - Please don't edit my posts!
Trucker vs Airline Pilot. It's pretty much the same thing.

~You still burn diesel.
~Talk on the radio
~Dispatch runs the show but it's your fault when something goes wrong.
~Your load follows you everywhere you go.
~You don't want to be overloaded.
~Weather is still an issue.
~You are always the first person to arrive at an accident.
~You go slower when climbing, faster going down hill.
~Lots of nights on the road.
~Crappy food.
~The DOT and NTSB isn't your friend.
~You have to keep a log book.
~You'll be backed up in traffic.
~Some yo-yo will hit you with the high beams.
~When it's busy you'll have to wait your turn to load.
~You can't leave the loading dock until the load is strapped down.
~ At times you'll wish you still had a horn.

Just one extra lever you'll need to learn.

 
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Freightshaker

Active Member
Update: On Saturday after work I was able to visit a flight school at RDU. The school is Blue Line Aviation. I was really impressed with their aircraft (DA-20, DA-40, and a newer C172). A flight instructor and a girl working in the office showed me around and it seems like a well put together professional outfit. They made it clear upfront that they didn't know anything about pricing and that I'd have to speak to one of their customer service reps. So today that will be my mission. Right now it seems that my priorities are schedule and price. Has anybody hear heard of or have experience with this school? What sort of questions should I be asking them?

Dan
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
Honestly, I feel their prices should be linked from a home page for their business online. No reason to hide it. I mean, having folks show you around and then defer to a salesman just reeks of something weird to me. Sort of unhonest. For sure get a quote for X amount for Y rating and then get an hourly quote for each aircraft with and without a CFI. That's the only way to compare apples to oranges. And put it out here for us to see as you will surly get people commenting on various other schools and prices. Anyhow, I'm a fan of the small, low tech, school. I don't run one so I can't really comment on prices but I just thing if you can find the right little place you can get great training at a cheaper price.
 

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
Update: On Saturday after work I was able to visit a flight school at RDU. The school is Blue Line Aviation. I was really impressed with their aircraft (DA-20, DA-40, and a newer C172). A flight instructor and a girl working in the office showed me around and it seems like a well put together professional outfit. They made it clear upfront that they didn't know anything about pricing and that I'd have to speak to one of their customer service reps. So today that will be my mission. Right now it seems that my priorities are schedule and price. Has anybody hear heard of or have experience with this school? What sort of questions should I be asking them?

Dan
Red flag #1. That’s pretty ridiculous.
 

bimmerphile

SuperCritical™ Member
Every flight school I've ever been to has the rates on a board and it's the first thing you see. Wondering if they charge different rates for different students/GI Bill.
 

Yetti

Active Member
having prices publicly posted prevents tomfoolery. People have been burned by up fronting money. Check to see if they have planes for rental after you get your license. seems fishy
 

Markf64

Well-Known Member
Honestly, I feel their prices should be linked from a home page for their business online. No reason to hide it. I mean, having folks show you around and then defer to a salesman just reeks of something weird to me. Sort of unhonest. For sure get a quote for X amount for Y rating and then get an hourly quote for each aircraft with and without a CFI. That's the only way to compare apples to oranges. And put it out here for us to see as you will surly get people commenting on various other schools and prices. Anyhow, I'm a fan of the small, low tech, school. I don't run one so I can't really comment on prices but I just thing if you can find the right little place you can get great training at a cheaper price.

THIS!!
 

Freightshaker

Active Member
So at Blue Line they have a weird sliding scale on cost. They gave me a break down for a DA-20 2 lessons or less a week is 160 for aircraft 75 instructor. 3-5 lessons a week 150 aircraft 65 instructor, 6 lessons a week 140 aircraft 55 instructor. Obviously there's no way I'd able to do more than 2 in a week. So the first one would apply. I spoke to a friend of mine who flies out of RDU and he recommended some folks a couple buildings down called flightgest. I spoke with them, and they told me the cost over phone. I believe it was 179 for a Piper archer and 52 for an instructor. The price difference is negligible but these folks were reccomended. I scheduled a lesson this Saturday. We'll see how it goes.

Dan
 

desertdog71

Girthy Member
@falconvalley told me about this thread the other day and I figured I would check in.

Go to a mom and pop FBO and take some lessons to see if you even like it and have the aptitude first. If you do, then continue at the FBO and get as many ratings as you can knocked out for as cheap as you can. Study your backside off on your own to supplement what you are learning. End goal is get your CFI ratings and instruct. Instructing will make you better as a pilot and better prepared for a career. Progressing from there will be a little bit of planning and a lot of luck.

I got all my ratings at a nothing FBO in Kansas, I instructed there and tried to make a viable career program work there. The economy tanked and I was back driving truck for 4 years without even touching an airplane for 4 years. I got hired by a regional in 2013 upgraded, got 1000 hours PIC and left. I got hired at a cargo outfit that experienced a lot of growth in a short period and recently upgraded again. It took some ballsy decisions and a lot of luck to get where I am now, and I could have easily given up many times and been miserable driving instead.

There are a handful of genuine people here and there that can help you along the way and there are others that talk a good story, you decide who is who. Many will tell you to avoid this career, some will tell you that your're not smart enough, not educated enough, not young enough, not healthy enough and every other excuse in the book. It really boils down to you. It's not easy but it's not that hard either.

You can PM me for my email address if you like and we can correspond one on one, I don't get on forums any more but I'm willing to share my experiences and give advice if you want it.
 

MikeFavinger

Hubschrauber Flieger
I don't get on forums any more
Just curious, why?

With well over a decade here I see a common theme... person dreams of flying, joins JC, interacts a lot and pulls info, gains networking contacts, gets starter job, gets career job, stops JC. I remember when you joined and I enjoyed watching your journey and now that you’ve gained success, people, like the OP here, could certainly use your help.

We’re you wronged here in some way?
 
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