Trashy Boeings

jcpilot

Well-Known Member

Seems like Boeing needs to get its QC department in order.

Is this a common occurance? I’ve seen trash inside walls while demoing houses, but I would think that people putting together airplanes would be a bit more careful.
 

SrFnFly227

Well-Known Member
Honestly doesn’t surprise me much. Just had our plane at an OEM maintenance facility and they did our repairs to somebody else’s plane and then signed our logs off (including QC stamp). They then fixed it wrong in their attempt to correct their mistake so they redid it in the morning.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Sounds like you live out on the Fifth Borough and not LI...
Oh you should see the stuff I dug up in the area that was untouched by the construction. It used to be a wooded lot so it’s where all the teenagers would hide out. Liquor bottles, beer cans, an entire gym outfit (gym shorts and shirt), an unopened jar of pickles. Really confused as to what took place here.
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
Oh you should see the stuff I dug up in the area that was untouched by the construction. It used to be a wooded lot so it’s where all the teenagers would hide out. Liquor bottles, beer cans, an entire gym outfit (gym shorts and shirt), an unopened jar of pickles. Really confused as to what took place here.
I'm not.

 
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Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun

Seems like Boeing needs to get its QC department in order.

Is this a common occurance? I’ve seen trash inside walls while demoing houses, but I would think that people putting together airplanes would be a bit more careful.
You’ve probably never flown a plane that didn’t have an extra Phillips screw driver or 3/8 socket rattling around somewhere. Tools left behind is an honest mistake, albeit one an OEM has programs to prevent (obviously Boeing’s needs work). Trash left in the plane, especially in a new build though? That’s just crappy workmanship.
 

BravoHotel

Well-Known Member
When I worked AF MX we had an ORI in which a single metal filing, rivet, or random piece of hardware was sufficient for you to be de-certed and your section to fail or take a major hit on the inspection. The fact they are already pre - delivered with FOD shows a severe lack of QA and cleanliness.
 

JDean3204

Well-Known Member
You’ve probably never flown a plane that didn’t have an extra Phillips screw driver or 3/8 socket rattling around somewhere. Tools left behind is an honest mistake, albeit one an OEM has programs to prevent (obviously Boeing’s needs work). Trash left in the plane, especially in a new build though? That’s just crappy workmanship.
Whenever I’m in the mx hangar, it really surprises me how loose tool control and house cleaning is in the civilian world. I didn’t agree with some things in the Navy and at times thought the anal ways of going about our business was over the top. But our planes and flight lines were completely clean. We had numerous fod walk downs, ATAF about 5 times a shift, silhouetted tool boxes with everything signed out and checked by a CDI, for tools from other work centers a tool tag, and labeled bags with consumables inventoried. If we lost one little thing, the squadron and flight line would shut down. Heck on the boat they made us sew our pockets shut and suck up liquid fod with vaccum cleaners. If you were caught not complying by a QA rep, it could mean your arse would be a little smaller and if bad enough you’d lose rank and pay. It worked, probably the only way to prevent issues when most workers were 19-23 years old with very little previous experience.
 
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ASpilot2be

Qbicle seat warmer
Whenever I’m in the mx hangar, it really surprises me how loose tool control and house cleaning is in the civilian world. I didn’t agree with some things in the Navy and at times thought the anal ways of going about our business was over the top. But our planes and flight lines were completely clean. We had numerous fod walk downs, ATAF about 5 times a shift, silhouetted tool boxes with everything signed out and checked by a CDI, for tools from other work centers a tool tag, and labeled bags with consumables inventoried. If we lost one little thing, the squadron and flight line would shut down. Heck on the boat they made us sew our pockets shut and suck up liquid fod with vaccum cleaners. If you were caught not complying by a QA rep, it could mean your arse would be a little smaller and if bad enough you’d lose rank and pay. It worked, probably the only way to prevent issues when most workers were 19-23 years old with very little previous experience.
Ha! I had an OCF delayed the other day because a tool was missing.
 

JDean3204

Well-Known Member
Ha! I had an OCF delayed the other day because a tool was missing.
So there is some sort of tool control then! Good to know :)

My observations were brief, hope I don’t offend any civi mechs by saying that. I’m sure they hold themselves accountable with their work as their certs are on the line as well
 

Screaming_Emu

Dogsheep
Oh you should see the stuff I dug up in the area that was untouched by the construction. It used to be a wooded lot so it’s where all the teenagers would hide out. Liquor bottles, beer cans, an entire gym outfit (gym shorts and shirt), an unopened jar of pickles. Really confused as to what took place here.
Dude. Free stuff is free stuff.
 

Flyinthrew

Well-Known Member
I frankly think it is marvelous that the leadership at the very tip top of the organization is so openly concerned about flight safety BEFORE the mishaps occur. Usually their only nods toward the matter are to publish a policy letter about it, and then hammer their own aircrew and maintainers on it the way JDean talks about with little accountability for outside organizations until mishaps occur. Them calling the darling new baby ugly in Congress is an incredible show of faith with their people out on the flight line. It is also an indictment of the culture at Boeing. Looks like the Boeing Lean Six Sigma people get to go on a trip.
 

Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
Whenever I’m in the mx hangar, it really surprises me how loose tool control and house cleaning is in the civilian world. I didn’t agree with some things in the Navy and at times thought the anal ways of going about our business was over the top. But our planes and flight lines were completely clean. We had numerous fod walk downs, ATAF about 5 times a shift, silhouetted tool boxes with everything signed out and checked by a CDI, for tools from other work centers a tool tag, and labeled bags with consumables inventoried. If we lost one little thing, the squadron and flight line would shut down. Heck on the boat they made us sew our pockets shut and suck up liquid fod with vaccum cleaners. If you were caught not complying by a QA rep, it could mean your arse would be a little smaller and if bad enough you’d lose rank and pay. It worked, probably the only way to prevent issues when most workers were 19-23 years old with very little previous experience.
Meanwhile, walk around most airline ramps...
 
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