• Guest! Follow new job postings on Twitter and Facebook

TransPac Aviation Academy Hiring CFIs

Max Grossweight

Well-Known Member
Responsible for conducting flight, ground, and simulator training under FAR Parts 141 and 61. Minimum Requirements: CFI, CFII, MEI, and a FAA 2nd Class Medical. Attractive, industry-leading packages offered in addition to a base salary. Full comprehensive benefits plan consisting of medical, dental, vision, 401k, vacation, sick time, holiday pay, etc. Phoenix weather allows for year round flying with little down time. Class Bravo airspace will allow for an exciting and fulfilling training environment.
Submit resume to: alewis@TransPacAcademy.com
When applying, ref:jetcareers.com
 

redwings191

Well-Known Member
Responsible for conducting flight, ground, and simulator training under FAR Parts 141 and 61. Minimum Requirements: CFI, CFII, MEI, and a FAA 2nd Class Medical. Attractive, industry-leading packages offered in addition to a base salary. Full comprehensive benefits plan consisting of medical, dental, vision, 401k, vacation, sick time, holiday pay, etc. Phoenix weather allows for year round flying with little down time. Class Bravo airspace will allow for an exciting and fulfilling training environment.
Submit resume to: alewis@TransPacAcademy.com
When applying, ref:jetcareers.com
TransPac is hiring! No way! They never hire!
 

gosleddog

Well-Known Member
They are flying seminoles day and night, over my house, all the time. (those asian guys do very little single [archer] time) I don't know how many hours any particular CFI gets in a month, but its going to be pretty hard to beat. DVT is the busiest airport in the country with no 121 ops, and majority of flights are TP twins.
 

ftyflyboy

Well-Known Member
You will take 4 students from private to instrument then comm multi. The process runs about 10-11 months. In that time you can expect about 100 hrs of multi. If you hustle and pick up open missions, it could be more.

I was there just under two years and flew 1750 hours. 200ish of that time was multi-engine.
 

TopGunn

Well-Known Member
Texasflyer worked there recently from August - May. He can chime in more for those who are interested in the position.
 

cfitime

Well-Known Member
You will take 4 students from private to instrument then comm multi. The process runs about 10-11 months. In that time you can expect about 100 hrs of multi. If you hustle and pick up open missions, it could be more.

I was there just under two years and flew 1750 hours. 200ish of that time was multi-engine.
What if I just want to teach IFR? Sure I'll take on an occasional private. On a serious note, what can a CFI make per month? Can CFI make 50k a year like some are in Florida?
 

at1024

displaced Texan
I got a buddy who works there and he said you're salaried at $30k base and most instructors average around $35k with bonuses.
 

Kristie

Mama Bear....
Staff member
Texasflyer worked there recently from August - May. He can chime in more for those who are interested in the position.
Crazyjaydawg, i think, still works there. He can chime in on it more as well.

I would add that most of their students (98%) are chinese with english speaking issues. I guess the Chinese don't train them enough english before coming over to the states. To make it easier on the teacher, it would be a good idea IMO for TP to add an english communication course or a chinese language course...english would be easier IMO....(also added to the contract negotiations with the Chinese) simply for the benefit of the teachers (so there are no more deaths, not to say the deaths are due to english issues, who knows why those planes really went down). all the Chinese need to learn, speaking and definition wise, is the pilot speak thats spoken every day there via microphone to pilot and ATC while taxiing and off the ground. sign language will not work.
 

gosleddog

Well-Known Member
I agree with all that Kristie said. If memory serves, for the recent accidents, all the students were Chinese. Being on the radio at a very busy airport with people that take "a long time" to request anything can get frustrating. The Deer Valley controllers are very patient / good about it, but at some point, I think students should be grounded until their English improves, but that doesn't seem to be the way they operate. You never know if they really understand things like "climb above 6,000 ft on your way north" or "be sure to get fuel when you land at the last airport on your cross country", which seem to be things not understood in 2 of the recent crashes.
 

ftyflyboy

Well-Known Member
Let's take it easy on the Monday morning quarterbacking. The accidents had nothing to do with the students English speaking abilities. All students are enrolled in an intensive aviation English program as part of the training.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
A number of weeks ago DVT, I was put into position/hold 25L (I know....), as a TransPac plane had landed on 25R and exited. He called up south tower with his position and it went something like this:

Trans: "Deer Valley Tower uuhhhhh, TransPac XX uhhhh, clear of runway 25 right."

DVT: "TransPac XX, hold short runway 25L at bravo 9, traffic departing runway 25L"

Trans: "Uhhhh, say again tower, Transpac XX"

DVT: "TransPac XX, hold short runway 25L at bravo 9, traffic departing runway 25L"

Trans: "TransPac XX, uhhh, Ok."

DVT: "TransPac XX, acknowledge hold short instructions"

Trans: "TransPac XX, say again?"

DVT: "TransPac XX, CROSS RUNWAY 25L at Bravo 9, contact ground!"

Trans: (english speaker) "TransPac XX, ok, cross runway 25L, contact ground, thank you"

DVT: "Sierra XX, traffic will be crossing downfield......remain line up and wait"


Just a standard day at DVT.
 

cfitime

Well-Known Member
A number of weeks ago DVT, I was put into position/hold 25L (I know....), as a TransPac plane had landed on 25R and exited. He called up south tower with his position and it went something like this:

Trans: "Deer Valley Tower uuhhhhh, TransPac XX uhhhh, clear of runway 25 right."
DVT: "TransPac XX, hold short runway 25L at bravo 9, traffic departing runway 25L"
Trans: "Uhhhh, say again tower, Transpac XX"
DVT: "TransPac XX, hold short runway 25L at bravo 9, traffic departing runway 25L"
Trans: "TransPac XX, uhhh, Ok."
DVT: "TransPac XX, acknowledge hold short instructions"
Trns: "TransPac XX, say again?"
DVT: "TransPac XX, CROSS RUNWAY 25L at Bravo 9, contact ground!"
Trans: (english speaker) "TransPac XX, ok, cross runway 25L, contact ground, thank you"
DVT: "Sierra XX, traffic will be crossing downfield......remain line up and wait"
Just a standard day at DVT.
Sounds like the dream job. I can't wait to jeopardize my certificate. When do I start? Do CFI's really go here?
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
Sounds like the dream job. I can't wait to jeopardize my certificate. When do I start? Do CFI's really go here?
Oh come on. There are a number of people on this site that have worked there. It's like that at every airport that has Asian student's I've ever been to, and it's also like that at most airports with heavy primary training.
 

cfitime

Well-Known Member
I cross paths with some of their instructors from time to time and they all seem happy
I'm sure these guys are happy running up the hobbs on the Chinese government credit card.:D

I image this job is for someone with tremendous patience. On the other hand I wouldn't be able to sleep at night knowing my student is flying around on a student certificate without know what his true knowledge due to the language barrier. I don't mean any disrespect for those who are employed here. In fact I admire them for taking on this challenge.
 

crazyjaydawg

Well-Known Member
Woah I can't believe I missed this thread, I guess I've kinda been busy these days.

Some things to note:

If you like flying and working your ass off then you will enjoy this place. In fact I really enjoyed working there and the only reason why I left is for career aspirations. Onwards and upwards I guess...

You fly close to 100 hours a month and every 9-10 months you will fly approx 100 hrs in the seminole. While it may not seem like a lot, it's more than enough to get you a job these days. I was cfiing for over 3 years (not all at transpac), if you can get your time and get out in 9-10 months consider yourself fortunate. The pay is as advertised. 30k base and 35k with bonuses seems normal, after a year or so you can get promoted to check airman and thats 45k-48k depending if you do some managing too. The chinese money is there for the taking!

Kristie is right on some things but I would say that out of the 400 or so students all but 2 are chinese, so closer to 99.5% are students with english issues.

All chinese students are enrolled in an english course, but intensive is not the adjective that I would use. A complete joke would be more discriptive, they spend a couple hours everyday learning all the states and their capitals.

As flyflyboy said, easy on the monday morning quarterbacking. I'm pretty sure english won't be the primary cause for the most recent accident. On that note I will say that I don't know of anyone that has lost their certificates as a result of working at TransPac, in my experience I was never forced to sign a student off and when students have taxiway incursions (they happen just like MikeD described) then the violation goes on the student's record and not the instructors. Unless you're a completely worthless instructor and do a lot of stupid things that would get your ticket pulled anways, I wouldn't worry about that if you wanna work at TransPac.

As far as accidents go remember that the fatal GA accident rate is 1:100,000hrs. Last year TransPac flew close to 115,000 hours. While I would like to think that everyone should do their best to make sure that it's not them, it's a tough training environment with a single pilot teaching in a single engine piston. Face it: the accidents will happen, just need to do your best to mitigate the chances.

So to wrap it all up: It takes a special person to work there and put up with all of it, but for me it was some of the most fun I had instucting and all the people that I worked with were pretty awesome. I would recommend it to anybody, just remember to bring some patience.
 

gosleddog

Well-Known Member
I'll stand up an take my lumps for the monday morning quarterbacking. I have no idea why the accidents occurred, and didn't mean to sound like I did. I reread my post and I think that I didn't really say what I meant. Its hard enough to teach someone to fly when you understand each other perfectly, and you are raised in very similar cultures and customs. When you are trying to teach someone who is struggling with communicating and following customs, it is just that much harder, and can lead to doubt about understanding what is truly meant. A foreign student may hesitate to question the instructor for fear of being considered disrespectful. My point was make sure that they really understand what you mean.
For how tough the radio environment is, you can listen yourself (if you have windows media player installed) http://squawkvfr.net and click on Deer Valley.
 
Top