Transitioning to 1982 Piper Warrior.

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
Due to a rate increase to $160 wet and $40 for the instructor at my current training place, my instructor is telling me to switch planes to the syracuse flying club and keep him as my instructor. I am going to do that so what are some tips to transition to the piper warrior?
 

SeanD

Well-Known Member
From a Cessna? I used to rotate from the 172 and Piper frequently. No big deal. I like the Piper much better. Thats just me though. :)
 

Italianaviator

Well-Known Member
It's not that big of a difference. The low wing does allow you to experience ground effect much more than in the Cessna. The one item that took me a while to get over was the fact that you have oleo struts on the mains instead of the bungie springs and at first that just felt so weird but after a few landings you get used to it and it becomes second nature. When I obtained a checkout in it the CFI said its practically a 172 with a low wing. Hope this helps.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
theyre so close its tough to really tell much difference. youll float a little more on landing but thats about it.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
Wait? I thought that Cessna's float more than pipers?

your mileage may vary, but they shouldnt, since the piper has its wing closer to the ground and thus more pronounced ground effect...

but really, i dunno if its enough to notice, they fly VERY similar. you should be able to hop in and go.
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
I flew a 1977 Cherokee so similar but I prefer the '01 C172SP interior and nav package however the high-wing just plain sucks. I absolutely hate it.

The Piper was easier to stall and doesn't need as much rudder during turns.
 

Minuteman

“Dongola”
Due to a rate increase to $160 wet and $40 for the instructor at my current training place, my instructor is telling me to switch planes to the syracuse flying club and keep him as my instructor.
Urh? It's nice that your instructor is looking out for your cheese and all, but it strikes me as a little odd ... like he's leaving the school and taking as many students along as possible (because???).

I recommend you make your decision to change schools independently, but also in consideration of your instructor's advice. I.e., would you still change places even if your instructor weren't moving?

$160/hr seems a little steep for a 172 and so is $40/hr for private pilot instruction (but neither is obscene). Maybe it's those crazy New York prices.
 

SeanD

Well-Known Member
I flew a 1977 Cherokee so similar but I prefer the '01 C172SP interior and nav package however the high-wing just plain sucks. I absolutely hate it.

The Piper was easier to stall and doesn't need as much rudder during turns.
:yeahthat: I also like the old emergency brake flap handle in the Piper. Its easy to over use a flap with the electric flap tab in the Cessna. Not saying that I did that or anything. ;)
 

Nihon_Ni

Well-Known Member
Urh? It's nice that your instructor is looking out for your cheese and all, but it strikes me as a little odd ... like he's leaving the school and taking as many students along as possible (because???).

I recommend you make your decision to change schools independently, but also in consideration of your instructor's advice. I.e., would you still change places even if your instructor weren't moving?

$160/hr seems a little steep for a 172 and so is $40/hr for private pilot instruction (but neither is obscene). Maybe it's those crazy New York prices.
I couldn't agree more. What the OP has described seems to be unetheical behavior. Regardless of his motive, it's simply wrong to steal customers when changing jobs.
 

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
I couldn't agree more. What the OP has described seems to be unetheical behavior. Regardless of his motive, it's simply wrong to steal customers when changing jobs.
Well, it is sort of different than that. He is not leaving the school, but instead having me change planes run by a flying club. He will still bill through the original school so they still make money on the instructing, but not on the plane. Both him and the Chief CFI have always been members of the flying club that I have switched to and have both instructed in the flying clubs airplane and the flight schools airplane.
 

Maurus

The Great Gazoo
The transition wont be hard to the warrior. I actually think landing a warrior is easier than a 172.

Anyway, unless that 172 has a G1000 sitting in it, you are getting hosed on that price to rent. $160 for a 172SP is steep. You can fly a 2007 DA-40 G1000 with everything turned on other than charts for $155.00 at my flight school. Heck $90/hr would get you a Piper Cherokee.

As a note on instructor rates, $40-$45 seem to be standard from what I have seen for private instruction.

Wait? I thought that Cessna's float more than pipers?
It depends on the Piper you fly. A Piper Arrow will drop like a rock. It drops faster than the all powerful 172RG. I would say floating differences between a Cherokee or Warrior and a 172 are slim to none.
 

CaptainChris87

New Member
Due to a rate increase to $160 wet and $40 for the instructor at my current training place, my instructor is telling me to switch planes to the syracuse flying club and keep him as my instructor. I am going to do that so what are some tips to transition to the piper warrior?
I found that flying the Piper was more directionally stable than the cessna especially during crosswind approaches. Other than that I do not know if you flew the 172 SP? Now that has 180 Horsepower, so prepare for it to be a little bit more underpowered. Since it is a low wing you wont have much view of the ground but youll get the "real airplane" experience. Also flaring is the key thing. Its something I had a hard time with transitioning from a low to high wing. You go in much closer to the ground vs the high wing. And if you pitch a little too much,The Warrior being a low wing, prepare to float a bit. Other than that happy flying as I love flying the Warrior. Also I kind of like the manual flaps better than the electric ones on the cessnas, especially the older ones the Circuit breaker have a tendancy to pop and your flaps may not come down or up as necessary.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
Remember the fuel pump and forget the carb heat... but remember it's there if you need it ;)

Oh and don't forget to switch tanks... I would guess that there's nothing more embarrassing than landing on a highway... with PLENTY OF GAS.
 
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