Too much fuel in the tanks during pre-flight! What would you do?

HomerPilot

New Member
Hello!

looking to gain some insight on what your plan of action would be if you went out to your aircraft (Say a C172/C206) and the fueler fueled your tanks completely full. You are now significantly out of limits. What do you do?
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
(Just kidding. You should defuel, bump pax/cargo, or go burn off some gas, in that order of preference)
I think on some of these if you rock the wings back and forth the fuel will pour out the naca scoop and if the fuel comes out the scoop the EPA won't come after you.

Also if you sump for a couple hours same effect.


My name is jynxy and I approve this message.
 

Flyinthrew

Well-Known Member
With a 172, the fueler couldn't have overfilled it by that much physically. I think if it is more than ten or 15 gallons you might have to ask yourself what you're doing with your life. If you are at home field, you can put it in gas cans and dump it in when you get back. Away from home field and at an FBO that cares, it is their problem and they should make it right. If you're in BFE, good luck.
 

drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
Hello!

looking to gain some insight on what your plan of action would be if you went out to your aircraft (Say a C172/C206) and the fueler fueled your tanks completely full. You are now significantly out of limits. What do you do?
#1 - don't pay for the gas
#2 - make them pump it out.

If they can't / won't do #2, enjoy a 2 hour static runup while you burn the gas off.
 

Crop Duster

E pluribus unum
Hello!

looking to gain some insight on what your plan of action would be if you went out to your aircraft (Say a C172/C206) and the fueler fueled your tanks completely full. You are now significantly out of limits. What do you do?
If it's a 206 or 210 or certain varieties of 172, just park the plane on an angle, open the cross flow (both), then wait an hour or so. If you put a big bucket under the downhill wing vent, you can even save your fuel.:)

On the other hand, I've seen a 210 with a 3800lb mtow launch and fly just fine with a t/o weight of 7700lbs. I would never recommend such shenanigans, but balance is MUCH more important than weight.
 
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drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
On the other hand, I've seen a 210 with a 3800lb mtow launch and fly just fine with a t/o weight of 7700lbs. I would never recommend such shenanigans, but balance is MUCH more important than weight.
With enough runway, a few hundred pounds overweight, sure - it will fly. But not legally.

And there isn’t really any good reason to fly an airplane over gross when you know it shouldn’t be, and it got that way out of your control. Definition of someone else’s problem to fix.

The gas is almost certainly getting thrown away and written off once it is pumped off an airplane, might even encourage fuelers to pay more attention in the future (hahahahahaha, yeah, probably not)
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
If it's a 206 or 210 or certain varieties of 172, just park the plane on an angle, open the cross flow (both), then wait an hour or so. If you put a big bucket under the downhill wing vent, you can even save your fuel.:)

On the other hand, I've seen a 210 with a 3800lb mtow launch and fly just fine with a t/o weight of 7700lbs. I would never recommend such shenanigans, but balance is MUCH more important than weight.
If you have a nut rounder, just take the sump out. The threads are almost certainly 1/4npt on that size of airplane, hit the home despot, grab a couple gas cans a hose barb and 5ft of tubing.
Hell if you dont mind getting a bit of gas on your hand you can just get some 1" or so ID tubing and hold it there. Dont even need the wrench now.

After de fueling put the now full gas cans in the overhead compartments where their weight doesnt count. Magic, you're no longer overweight.
 

Jimmy_Norton

Opie killer
If you're in CG and have plenty of runway and no obstacles to clear, you'll be fine. But I would bitch at the FBO and get some free fuel out of them.
 

CaptainYoda

Well-Known Member
1. Don't die
2. Don't get violated by the FAA
3. Don't get fired

The right answer is to lighten the load and remain in CG.
If it's over gross by a lot or out of CG a lot, rule #1 is violated.
If it's over gross by a little and out of CG a little AND the wrong eyes sees it, rule #2 is violated.

You're a pilot, and know proper judgement and the consequences. Frankly, if you have to ask the question, you don't deserve the license.

On a more practical level, how stupid would you feel if you get a suspension on your permanent record because you too lazy to remove some extra fuel?

Don't let the knuckle heads reinforce bad habits.
 
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