Tomahawk or 150?

jag

New Member
I’m about to start working on my PPL and I’ve decided on a local FBO. The instructor I talked to said that I could either choose to learn in the Tomahawk or the 150 (same price). There are 3 Tomahawks and one 150 so the Tomahawks would allow for more flexibility. I looked through some of the posts though and it seems like some people could care less for the Tomahawk. Any suggestions? thanks
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Tramahawk! I liked it. A little more comfy than a 150, but it depends on how large of a person you are.
 

PhotoPilot

New Member
I'm with Doug. I'm still training, but have been in 172s and Tommies. I'd take the Tomahawk anyday! They demand a bit more attention from the pilot, have great visibility, and make for an easy transition to twins. I love 'em! Almost perfect as training aircraft go.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I like the 150/152 series but if they have three on one and one of the other...and it's the same price....I'd have to say go with the Tomahawk since you'll have more flexability in case of maintenance problems.
 

USAFplt

Well-Known Member
I did my PPL training in the Tomahawk. It is a great little airplane. The visibility is great and I prefer the low wing to the Cessna's. Only negative was flying it during FL summers... the cockpit is one big greenhouse. The plane was very reliable though and the price couldnt be beat.
 

montanapilot

Well-Known Member
what about the stall characteristics of them? I heard that they are pretty abrupt and unpredictable in that area.
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
what about the stall characteristics of them? I heard that they are pretty abrupt and unpredictable in that area.

[/ QUOTE ]

All the better.


No, really, that's a good thing in a trainer.
 

PhotoPilot

New Member
Unpredictable? I don't think so . . .

You learn to be aware of what the plane is doing and to stay coordinated, but I wouldn't say they're unpredictable. I think the folks who find the Tomahawks to be squirelly learned in Cessnas and just aren't used to the differences.

There were a few incidents with spin accidents in them in the early 80's but those issues have been resolved with the addition of dual flow strips and a few other things. My school has 12 or so Tommies and they spin just fine!
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
My dad learned to fly in a tomahawk, and I learned in a warrier. So I'd pick the tomahawk, but I'm a piper snob!

My suggestion is to go for a flight in both, see which airplane you feel more comfortable in.
 

FL270

New Member
Heck, I learned in a Tampico! Anything's gotta be better than that. It was slower than dog snot, but pretty darn comfortable on that eight hour trip from DAB to CAE and back.

FL270
 

Josh

Well-Known Member
The PA38 is a bit faster, maybe. I think it does better in a crosswind, as well, so you can really go out with an instructor when it is blowing hard, and learn good technique. Larger, which is nice you don't have to overlap arms just to sit in there with an instructor. Better visibility both because of the layout of the glass, and because a low wing design. You can see better in a low wing, unless you really care what is right below the wing (and since you usually will not be flying sideways, I'd say you don't need to know what is there at that second, just look ahead). The transition to another plane will be quite easy as well. I believe the way a PA38 stalls is great for training. Slow flight can be fun as well. Fly one on heading, and altitude, and you'll have no problem with a quick transition to instrument flight, since you will be force to be on top of your flying.

If you like a high wing, with less space, go for the 150/152. If not, go for anything else


Also, ask the instructor what plane they prefer to teach in. And why.
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Why not fly both?

[/ QUOTE ]
There's the best anwer yet.

I had time in a 152, 172 and PA28 before getting my PPL. If you don't mind an extra hour or few getting your license, the experience of flying different planes is a pretty good one. I'd recommend sticking with only one until after you solo and get into the x-c work, then get checked out and solo again in the other.
The difference between planes will get you in the habit of really using the checklists, rather than the just skimming or ignoring it because it is so familiar.
Also, check the schedule on all the planes for the last month or so and see which one(s) have more availibility. You'd think the Tommy would because there are three of them, but if no one is flying the 152 it might actually be easier to schedule. Looking at the past records will tell you pretty quickly.
Have fun!
 

jdflight

Well-Known Member
I much prefer teaching in the Tomahawk over the Cessna, and the stall characteristics aren't a problem at all. The only unpredictable thing I could think of would be if you let it sit in a deep stall for too long. Then you're going to drop the left wing, almost guaranteed. And Photo, how exactly do you know how the Tomahawk spins? You're not supposed to have done that yet!
 

PhotoPilot

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
And Photo, how exactly do you know how the Tomahawk spins? You're not supposed to have done that yet!


[/ QUOTE ]

Uhh . . . Mazzei normally teaches spins as part of the CFI courses, and we graduate a lot of CFIs. Nobody's augered in during spin training, so they must spin rather predictably, right?


(Is that a politically correct answer, JD?
)
 

Mavmb

Well-Known Member
I think the 150 would be easier to learn in. That is a more stable airplane than the traumahawk. Traumahawk, it got that nickname for a reason! It has a lot of spiral instability with two big guys in the plane! Well who would ever thought I would ever go against the grain
but I gotta vote for the C-150 in this thread.
 
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