THEN AND NOW: Photos that show how glamorous flying used to be

nibake

Powder hound
I don't think the average person gets all of that. Sure there is some bad decision making involved, especially in these cases. But when you mention the number of flights to and from certain places, the number of alternatives, etc, I think people just don't know. I learned a great deal that I didn't know in the short time I was in CASS. Things like what part of the property the gates are on, what things are going to be like at a terminal, how close or far the baggage claims are going to be, how many flights of what size and shape and brand are going to/from certain cities in a day...to be honest, I didn't get any of that until I was able to get my feet wet. Is it fair of us to expect John and Jane Doe to understand why the 45 min connection was golden one day but the 2 hour connection was a disaster the next?
 

nibake

Powder hound
I don't think the average person gets all of that. Sure there is some bad decision making involved, especially in these cases. But when you mention the number of flights to and from certain places, the number of alternatives, etc, I think people just don't know. I learned a great deal that I didn't know in the short time I was in CASS. Things like what part of the property the gates are on, what things are going to be like at a terminal, how close or far the baggage claims are going to be, how many flights of what size and shape and brand are going to/from certain cities in a day...to be honest, I didn't get any of that until I was able to get my feet wet. Is it fair of us to expect John and Jane Doe to understand why the 45 min connection was golden one day but the 2 hour connection was a disaster the next?
@ChasenSFO I know you have been there and seen some of the worst cases of people making bad decisions and acting out. What I'm getting at is that in a lot of cases-imagine people like your or my family who don't fly often and may come to us for advice-they just don't understand enough of what is going on around them.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
I was ragging on one of AAs Super80s at adjacent gate this week. Did a google search to see just how old that ancient dinosaur was and found out it was younger than the Airbus I was In. Apologies were made.
I had thought AA had retired their last MD. Only because they were the jet that came to TUS, and you don't see them here anymore. Wonder when they will finally be done?
 

Kingairer

'Tiger Team' Member
I had thought AA had retired their last MD. Only because they were the jet that came to TUS, and you don't see them here anymore. Wonder when they will finally be done?
There’s about 30 left. All but two are 99 or newer, mostly X-TWA. The final date has moved back many times but now it’s looking like end of 2019.
 

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
It’s not so much the market has decided this is what it wants as people can’t afford to spend the hundreds of dollars extra per ticket for a few more inches and have no choice (aside from not flying at all) ((and I’m not talking about the ULCCs))
I’m a 6’1” 200 on dude. I flew all over the US in the back of RJs for 7 years. It’s really not that bad. If you’re extraordinarily tall, you are an outlier and spending extra $ for leg room seems reasonable.
 

ChasenSFO

hen teaser
@ChasenSFO I know you have been there and seen some of the worst cases of people making bad decisions and acting out. What I'm getting at is that in a lot of cases-imagine people like your or my family who don't fly often and may come to us for advice-they just don't understand enough of what is going on around them.
I agree 100%. Though in my personal experience, over 50% fall into the "Hey, we live in the age of google, maybe do a little research into the 'what ifs' when you fly somewhere within 1-3 hours of something important" category, where the only reason that person is flying last minute is an expectation that the plane will operate like a bus and get there as planned 100% of the time. These people could have left the day before, that morning, ect, but thought it a "waste of time" because "what can go wrong"? BART trains in San Francisco are far more reliable than air travel, and I know nothing about the inner workings of underground rail, but I know it is a good idea to not pick a train that gets me to the city with 10 minutes to spare for an interview. I'd think this falls into the same common sense.

Now again, I feel bad for those backed against the wall with no choice but to fly day of and close to the event, but not so much for those who are in their situation because they are far too care-free about their planned transportation then have the nerve to cause a major scene. Not a lot of my missing a wedding/funeral/interview stories do not involve making a scene. And most were probably very preventable, but not all, of course.
 

Autothrust Blue

The frakkin’ CAG
I’m a 6’1” 200 on dude. I flew all over the US in the back of RJs for 7 years. It’s really not that bad. If you’re extraordinarily tall, you are an outlier and spending extra $ for leg room seems reasonable.
I am routinely punished for being four-sigma taller than the average. I see no reason why others similarly situated should not also be routinely punished.
 

mrivc211

Well-Known Member
I’m just barely old enough to remember that going to your gate involved an actual gate in the fence. You walked through it, to the airplane. The airplane had some mechanical contraption on the side requiring some physical exertion to board the airplane.
I remember picking up my aunt from SNA when all they had was a chain link fence. 737-200 rolled up, airstairs pushed upto door, you walked out the airplane and into your car in under 2 minutes.
KSNA.jpg
sna2.jpg
 

Cazadores

Well-Known Member
I remember picking up my aunt from SNA when all they had was a chain link fence. 737-200 rolled up, airstairs pushed upto door, you walked out the airplane and into your car in under 2 minutes. View attachment 46460View attachment 46461
Me too, it was my aunt, on Air California, I think from Sacramento, we would wait for her on the patio at Delaneys on the second floor of the Eddie Martin terminal eating Manhattan clam chowder, watching Hughes Air West DC-9s, Air California 737-200s, lots of light GA.

Those really were great times. I miss that Southern California, even more than I miss the aviation of those days-I guess for me it is sort of hand in hand.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

mrivc211

Well-Known Member
Me too, it was my aunt, on Air California, I think from Sacramento, we would wait for her on the patio at Delaneys on the second floor of the Eddie Martin terminal eating Manhattan clam chowder, watching Hughes Air West DC-9s, Air California 737-200s, lots of light GA.

Those really were great times. I miss that Southern California, even more than I miss the aviation of those days-I guess for me it is sort of hand in hand.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
word for word my thoughts. Simpler times. no cell phones. No rushing. You get there when you get there. Summers lasted forever. I remember flying to Dubai in 1989. We flew SNA-DFW on AA. The plane broke in DFW while onboard. We sat in that plane for 8 hours delayed. Not one person made a stink about it. After 8 hours they came back to the plane and refueled us, we departed to LHR on a DC-10. Sat in LHR for 6 hours until a big "Heavy" Emirates A300 pulled up. I remember seeing a BA Concorde taxi by the gate. No one knew where Dubai was at the time, nor who Emirates was. All they kept talking about was Dubai was going to be world known in less than 10 years because "big plans" were in the works.
 
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MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
Some cool 737 trivia....the Air California -200 pictured not only has the forward airstairs, but also the rare rear airstairs. Unlike the forward airstairs, which retract fully into an area underneath the cabin floor, the rear airstairs use a series of gears and pulleys aft of the last row of seats on the left side. They retract and fold up, stowing vertically in front of the door. The L2 door is not a standard plug-type door, as can be seen, and is longer and wider than the normal L1 and R1/2 doors. Additionally, there is no slide incorporated with the L2 door, as there is no way to access it with the stairs blocking the doorway.....no room to mount it, no way to arm/disarm, or even access it. An "emergency drop" feature, would merely drop the stairs on top of a deployed slide anyway. Odd to see in this photo, because normally, only 737 combi jets would have this, what with the forward half of the aircraft carrying cargo. But leaving the after half of the jet where the pax seats are with really one emergency exit, the R2.
 
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mrivc211

Well-Known Member
Some cool 737 trivia....the Air California -200 pictured not only has the forward airstairs, but also the rare rear airstairs. Unlike the forward airstairs, which retract fully into an area underneath the cabin floor, the rear airstairs use a series of gears and pulleys aft of the last row of seats on the left side. They retract and fold up, stowing vertically in front of the door. The L2 door is not a standard plug-type door, as can be seen, and is longer and wider than the normal L1 and R1/2 doors. Additionally, there is no slide incorporated with the L2 door, as there is no way to access it with the stairs blocking the doorway.....no room to mount it, no way to arm/disarm, or even access it. An "emergency drop" feature, would merely drop the stairs on top of a deployed slide anyway. Odd to see in this photo, because normally, only 737 combi jets would have this, what with the forward half of the aircraft carrying cargo. But leaving the after half of the jet where the pax seats are with really one emergency exit, the R2.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
I remember picking up my aunt from SNA when all they had was a chain link fence. 737-200 rolled up, airstairs pushed upto door, you walked out the airplane and into your car in under 2 minutes.
SRQ was just like this in the 70s and early 80s. Dad used to fly Eastern a lot and we had the same experience.
 
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