The Mighty 727

knot4u

Repeat Offender
I watched that video again and realized it had to have been taken during my time there, that idling Hughes 500 belonged to Burbank PD and was replaced by a Notar before I left. 727s weren't uncommon at KBUR then, Fedex had (still has) a ramp there for a daily 727 that I used to fuel most evenings. I think they use an A300 these days. After I stopped trying to work full time and go to school full time I got a part time job with Ameriflight providing ground support to UPS when they decided to start operations at KBUR. I was the only person they hired that had any experience towing and could consistently push the tow bar down the service road on the centerline in their big tug so I got what turned out to be one of the cushiest jobs on the ramp, pushback tug driver. I was a little nervous the first time the 757 finally showed up but it actually turned out that, at least for me, the larger the plane the easier it is to push because of the longer wheelbase.
 
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Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
Nothing like doing a powerback in the 727....

It was a most splendid conveyance.
It goes like this....

You get a "buddy" DC-9. Can be running the APU...or just running. Connect the pneumatic hose from the pneumatic port on one DC-9 to the other. Apply bleed air. Start. Done. Laugh politely at 100th innuendo laced joke from the CA about this process.

Or, you can just roll the first DC-9 down a hill and let the clutch out.

As for powerbacks...they go like this:

1) Wait for rampers to show up to give you the spinning finger.
2) Point out that rampers have no safety goggles.
3) Wait 5 minutes while rampers go find safety goggles.
4) Ramper finally gives you the finger, the stars align and you actually have the required wing walkers.
5) Start both engines.
6) Roll forward a bit to "get off the flat spots"
7) Set 1.4 EPR ("1.4 feet on the floor"). Remind self to keep away from the brakes.
8) Much sound and fury, and a vortex of sand, crap and debris swirl around the airplane.
9) FINALLY start creeping backwards at a clam's pace. Remind self to keep away from the brakes.
10) Pray that the ramper is paying attention, and not direcrting you into a culvert, ditch or other immovable object.
11) When enough groundhogs have been deafened by the sound and fury from #7, GENTLY come out of reverse and use a touch of thrust to stop. Remind self to keep away from the brakes.
12) Observe, with some satisfaction, that the fuel you just burned could have powered a tug until the heat death of the universe.
13) Proceed onwards to a life of religious fulfillment.

Note: All of the above are done with hand signals.

The 727 version of this was similar, except:
5a) Remember to remind the FE to turn the packs off
8a) Much more sound and fury.
9a) Backwards movement is 1/10 of a clam's pace.
11a) Remember to remind the FE turn backs back on.

Richman
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
The 727 was Boeing’s REAL sonic cruiser...

Aaaand I see the same company that produced the 737, and it reminds me of a conversation with my mom about “other parts of the family”, which would start with “well, everyone is special in their own way”...
 

FloridaLarry

Well-Known Member
Back in August of 2008, I volunteered at the DNC Convention in Denver that nominated Barack Obama. I was assigned to work an exhibit of "Air Force One" from the Reagan era. A couple of guys has purchased an airframe, cut off the wings, baggage compartments and tail, mounted it on a truck trailer, and painted it appropriately. Must have been fun to pass on the Interstate!

I walked through the main door, and (of course) looked into the cockpit. FE's station, lots of steam gauges, and - wait - only three throttles. All Air Force Ones of the era were four-engine 707s. Oops.

This 727 airframe had started life working for Eastern, then moved to various other carriers doing sports charters, etc and even spent some time as John Kerry's presidential campaign plane. The interior was mocked up with a communications bay and Presidential office, ending in a 'back porch' for photo ops. They even had Jelly Beans on the Presidential desk (but probably not original Reagan-era candy). Since the fuselage of the 727 was pretty much identical to the 707s, they kind of got away with it, at least for their purposes. I quickly developed the patter to explain this when asked (few did), and had a ball.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
Back in August of 2008, I volunteered at the DNC Convention in Denver that nominated Barack Obama. I was assigned to work an exhibit of "Air Force One" from the Reagan era. A couple of guys has purchased an airframe, cut off the wings, baggage compartments and tail, mounted it on a truck trailer, and painted it appropriately. Must have been fun to pass on the Interstate!

I walked through the main door, and (of course) looked into the cockpit. FE's station, lots of steam gauges, and - wait - only three throttles. All Air Force Ones of the era were four-engine 707s. Oops.

This 727 airframe had started life working for Eastern, then moved to various other carriers doing sports charters, etc and even spent some time as John Kerry's presidential campaign plane. The interior was mocked up with a communications bay and Presidential office, ending in a 'back porch' for photo ops. They even had Jelly Beans on the Presidential desk (but probably not original Reagan-era candy). Since the fuselage of the 727 was pretty much identical to the 707s, they kind of got away with it, at least for their purposes. I quickly developed the patter to explain this when asked (few did), and had a ball.
Did you sell those two guys down the river and fry their asses? Just like any pilot who goes to a technically-incorrect aviation movie would do? :)
 

FloridaLarry

Well-Known Member
Did you sell those two guys down the river and fry their asses? Just like any pilot who goes to a technically-incorrect aviation movie would do? :)
No, I was kind.

Couple of guys trying to make a buck, and I got the idea that this project was a last-minute thing. Plus, doing this to a 707 would have involved far more saw-zawl work and left a bigger pile of almuminum shrapnel.

The atmosphere at that convention was so amazing, upbeat and hopeful. I wouldn't have dared to inject any negativity :cool:
 

mrivc211

Well-Known Member
48089


I got to ride up front of this a bunch of times zig zagging the middle east in the 90's. The first time as an infant escaping Afghanistan when the USSR invaded, then again as a teenager. I'll never forget that first flight from DXB outbound to Sri Lanka. I'm 13 years old, sitting in first class, the FA walks up to me and says "you can go to the cockpit if you want, your dads up there". I was in utter amazement thinking I could just walk in there as I pleased. So I stood up, while they were taxing, walked up to the cockpit and opened the door and sat down. After takeoff, climbing thru 18,000, my dad turned around and asked what I thought, and I said to him, "its a small plane". Within .2 seconds he 86'd me out the cockpit and threw me back in the cabin. I never understood why until years later when I started flying cessna's and realized how big a 727 actually was and then growing a bigger appreciation for the plane when I was flying the CRJ900 into small podunk towns with pax getting on asking when we were gonna fly "a real airplane" into Bakersfield. I couldnt help feel like this at that moment:

and I couldnt help but realize I probably made my dad feel the same way that day in the cockpit of his B727 zooming around the middle east. :bounce:
 

Cazadores

Well-Known Member
If Braniff taught us anything, it’s that we’re all one CEO away from bankruptcy.
Lawrence, Casey, or Putnam?

Regardless, I'll give credit to Lawrence for making Braniff what must have been an amazing place to be...... up until it wasn't....

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
If Braniff taught us anything, it’s that we’re all one CEO away from bankruptcy.
The decline and fall of Braniff teaches many lessons, I'm not sure that you can point at one CEO.

Deregulation and doubling of fuel costs multiplied the problems of expansion and poor matching of routes and aircraft. Add labor issues and the writing was on the wall.

Imagine today's regional carriers trading in their RJ's for 727's. That gives you an idea what Braniff was attempting with their all-jet fleet.
 
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