The Flying Mustache Retires

typhoonpilot

Well-Known Member
I don't think Les ever filled the shoes of Len Morgan or Tom Block.

Those are some pretty dang big shoes though!

Martha Lunken makes me feel like Bax did sometimes. I miss Bax, nobody loved flying and could talk about it like he could.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

Bax was awesome as was Len Morgan. Tom Block on the other hand was, if not number 1, very close to the top of everyone's no fly list at USAir.
 

Springer

Well-Known Member
Bax was awesome as was Len Morgan. Tom Block on the other hand was, if not number 1, very close to the top of everyone's no fly list at USAir.
The CA that was convicted of flying while "drunk" along with the FO and FE in the late '80's was on my and other's no fly list long before the incident happened.
 

Springer

Well-Known Member
"Many factors were involved, but simply stated, it was time. I could feel it in my gut. Although I still loved the visceral challenge and skill required to maneuver a 775,000-pound machine, the task had become more about managing than about flying. Even with the autopilot disconnected, a regular routine I practiced on takeoff, climb, approach and landing (much to my copilots’ dismay), my efforts were just a surrogate to the reality of sending electronic signals to a computer. And that was OK. But the repetitive nature of the airline routine was becoming tedious. A great career had become a job."

I can relate. Hit me on a leg to SFO where our 24 hr downtown layover was now at an airport hotel due to cutbacks. Looked over at the FO during climb out and said, "This is no longer fun."

Retired @ 59.
 

chrisreedrules

Master Blaster
I never really read any of his other articles nor do I read much Flying Magazine in general. I have to think some of the self-aggrandizement is due simply to the fact that he is a writer and it is his job to some extent. That being said I can’t see making a big deal out of punching out.

When I go I don’t want any water cannon salute or cakes or any buddies riding on my jumpseat (am I the only who thought that was strange?). I just want to go quietly.
 

Autothrust Blue

The frakkin’ CAG
"Many factors were involved, but simply stated, it was time. I could feel it in my gut. Although I still loved the visceral challenge and skill required to maneuver a 775,000-pound machine, the task had become more about managing than about flying. Even with the autopilot disconnected, a regular routine I practiced on takeoff, climb, approach and landing (much to my copilots’ dismay), my efforts were just a surrogate to the reality of sending electronic signals to a computer. And that was OK. But the repetitive nature of the airline routine was becoming tedious. A great career had become a job."

I can relate. Hit me on a leg to SFO where our 24 hr downtown layover was now at an airport hotel due to cutbacks. Looked over at the FO during climb out and said, "This is no longer fun."

Retired @ 59.
Millbrae isn’t awful, merely okay.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
I never really read any of his other articles nor do I read much Flying Magazine in general. I have to think some of the self-aggrandizement is due simply to the fact that he is a writer and it is his job to some extent. That being said I can’t see making a big deal out of punching out.

When I go I don’t want any water cannon salute or cakes or any buddies riding on my jumpseat (am I the only who thought that was strange?). I just want to go quietly.
I’m gonna be like:

B2F29D97-EBFE-44ED-BFDB-06FA63B15507.jpeg
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
"Many factors were involved, but simply stated, it was time. I could feel it in my gut. Although I still loved the visceral challenge and skill required to maneuver a 775,000-pound machine, the task had become more about managing than about flying. Even with the autopilot disconnected, a regular routine I practiced on takeoff, climb, approach and landing (much to my copilots’ dismay), my efforts were just a surrogate to the reality of sending electronic signals to a computer. And that was OK. But the repetitive nature of the airline routine was becoming tedious. A great career had become a job."

I can relate. Hit me on a leg to SFO where our 24 hr downtown layover was now at an airport hotel due to cutbacks. Looked over at the FO during climb out and said, "This is no longer fun."

Retired @ 59.
I hope that, for me, it never becomes just a job. But if it ever does I hope I'm in a position where I can walk away.

I don't want to be old and bitter, and there's so much other flying out there to be done.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
I hope that, for me, it never becomes just a job. But if it ever does I hope I'm in a position where I can walk away.

I don't want to be old and bitter, and there's so much other flying out there to be done.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
Problem is once it's "just a job," it's a really well paying job, and it becomes nearly impossible to replace the income toyre generating even halfway through you're career.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
Problem is once it's "just a job," it's a really well paying job, and it becomes nearly impossible to replace the income toyre generating even halfway through you're career.
Well the good news is that, so far, it's a job that has not disappointed ;)

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

Jordan93

Well-Known Member
I hope that, for me, it never becomes just a job. But if it ever does I hope I'm in a position where I can walk away.

I don't want to be old and bitter, and there's so much other flying out there to be done.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
I always tell people it’s the best part time full time job.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
Problem is once it's "just a job," it's a really well paying job, and it becomes nearly impossible to replace the income toyre generating even halfway through you're career.
This is my problem. I don't hate my job but it's a large pile of meh. I'd retire from it tomorrow with a big f you if I could. But there's potential for a lot of money on the Boring soulless side of aviation.
I can think of 3 jobs I'd love to do but they don't pay enough and are without a future. I don't want to work until I die even if I like the flying. Truth is the most fun flying is the one you get to say where to go. And that's fing expensive.
So in summary I do my job because money and I likely cannot replicate the potential income level elsewhere nor can I enjoy this amount of time off in another field.
To date it still baffles me how anyone that truly loves flying can say they enjoy flying a large jet.
 
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BigZ

Well-Known Member
To date it still baffles me how anyone that truly loves flying can say they enjoy flying a large jet.
Easy...
2004-2006 flying light airplanes, 65hp taildragger mostly
2007-2009 172 and Da20 for the most part
2010-2014 lotsa cool stuff. Experimentals, amphibs, taildraggers a bit. Get paid to instruct here and there a bit.
2015-2016 still flew my GA to work, work was a Grand Caravan, then Citation I, Ultra, Bravo, CJ, CJ2+ etc. Instruct in a pa28/172 on the side a bit.
2017 more instructing in ASEL, charter on a Phenom 300. Flying at FL450 a lot GA started losing its appeal. It is still fun, but not 4000 fpm descent over the Gulf to 320 ias to 12 nm offshore to 250 to chiching on the runway fun.
2018 airline, CRJ700. Not a big jet per se, but an airline nevertheless. It is fun to be a charter cowboy, but 121 is a much easier safer kind of a gig. I enjoy different things here, but still love flying that thing. Flew GA once this year. Fun? Yeah. Enjoy it more than a jet? Not necessarily.
I'm heavily considering selling my plane and getting back into gliders in a couple of years.
 

A Life Aloft

Well-Known Member
To date it still baffles me how anyone that truly loves flying can say they enjoy flying a large jet.
The views out the windows are just as wonderful and perhaps even more grand in their scope........the little lanterns on the fishing boats in the inky night over the South China Sea.............the sun climbing over Hong Kong.......the lush mountains peeking out of the mist over Thailand.......amazing storms......beautiful cloud formations and lightning in the distance......the rising of the various planets.....the magnificence of all the stars filling the night sky almost staggering in their singular beauty.........it's the wonder....... it's the little safe warm cocoon of the flight deck as you speed along in the nothingness towards your destination and you realize the perspective of just how small you are and just how grand the rest of the planet is......it's the contemplation of all the lives of the millions of people below you........it's the adventures, the food, the places you will see/visit, the people you will meet, the marvelous experiences that you will have and what you will learn along the way. At least it was for me.
 
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