The Battle for Eastern Airlnes

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#24
Didn't they go out of business pretty quickly?

Edit: never mind, I was thinking of the helicopter shuttle in Manhattan
No, you’re correct. He bankrupted it with rapidity and had to sell it off to USAir in 1991 for about a third what he paid for it, all paid for with debt relief because he was in debt up to his eyeballs.
 

OneNineHundy

Well-Known Member
#26
Just bought Hard Landing on kindle......unfortunately I accidentally bought it on my wife's amazon and had to deliver it to her device. But thanks for the rec ATN
Would you mind linking hard landing on kindle for me please. I can't find it for some reason.

Cheers
 
F

Flying Saluki

Guest
#30
He was certainly no picnic, but Eastern's problems didn't begin with Frank Lorenzo. Both the video and Hard Landing make that point repeatedly. But I think the argument could be made that he kept Continental alive long enough for Gordon Bethune to take over and save it. Read From Worst to First if you want to learn the story of the Continental turnaround.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
#31
He was certainly no picnic, but Eastern's problems didn't begin with Frank Lorenzo. Both the video and Hard Landing make that point repeatedly. But I think the argument could be made that he kept Continental alive long enough for Gordon Bethune to take over and save it. Read From Worst to First if you want to learn the story of the Continental turnaround.
It's easy to make a success when you start from the bottom. Continental was laid wasted afterwards and had all of their contracts abrogated.

Anything was an improvement at that point.
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#33
He was certainly no picnic, but Eastern's problems didn't begin with Frank Lorenzo. Both the video and Hard Landing make that point repeatedly. But I think the argument could be made that he kept Continental alive long enough for Gordon Bethune to take over and save it. Read From Worst to First if you want to learn the story of the Continental turnaround.
Yes, Eastern had plenty of problems before Lorenzo, including Boreman himself. But Eastern was saveable until Lorenzo got ahold of it. Once he started his hatchet job, Eastern was finished.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#34
It's easy to make a success when you start from the bottom. Continental was laid wasted afterwards and had all of their contracts abrogated.

Anything was an improvement at that point.
Success for the scabs, I suppose, who were later forgiven and re-admitted to the union.
.
 

ERfly

Well-Known Member
#36
Two more interesting docs:


Tailspin was great! If you want an amazing book on how Braniff bit it, I highly recommend Splash of Color (you can find it used on Amazon). When you watch the video and you see Howard Putnam's press conference the day they shut down, the play it out in the book from Howard's perspective and from the employee's perspective. Got my heart racing.

I'm reading "When KIWIs Flew", written by the guy that start KIWI International Air Lines. He talks about the end of Eastern and how he used that resolve and anger from the pilots to get KIWI up and running. So far, so good!
 
F

Flying Saluki

Guest
#37
"Forgiven" is really the wrong word. "Allowed membership for legal and organizing reasons" is about as far as I'd go. Nobody has forgiven what they did.
It’s not like the union didn’t walk the line. They did. But the strike was ineffective because Continental had lined up replacements. I get walking the line when it’s accomplishing something like United ‘85. But why fall on the sword for nothing?
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
#38
I don't think they "fell on their sword for nothing". UPS hired quite a few guys who struck at CO. I knew one of them very well. To scab, under any circumstances, is simply unforgivable. If they made it easy for CO it would have been really bad for the union. Plus, if they walk at least they could get hired elsewhere honorably. You scab, then CO goes down, you'll have a very sorry rest of your career.
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#39
It’s not like the union didn’t walk the line. They did. But the strike was ineffective because Continental had lined up replacements. I get walking the line when it’s accomplishing something like United ‘85. But why fall on the sword for nothing?
It’s difficuit for people to understand today, but you have to picture it as a war against Lorenzo and what he was doing to the industry. It wasn’t just a typical contract fight. This man was pure evil. People didn’t care if they died fighting, because it was worth the fight. And they did ultimately win. Lorenzo was finally banned forever from owning or operating an airline in this country. A lot of pilots, machinists, flights attendants, and other workers and their families suffered to make it happen, but they finally beat him after a long ugly decade. Don’t underestimate what that meant.
 

///AMG

Well-Known Member
#40
I'll say I didn't totally get the scab hate as an outsider initially. But after watching videos like this:

.......it doesn't take too much of an imagination to understand why the unionized employees went to war.......or why they would have never forgiven those who crossed picket lines and stood against them. In the first 2 minutes of the video, he not only introduces fear tactics, but also blatantly tries to turn the pilot/FA crowd against the IAM/machinists. Unbelievable. I love how the "host" makes himself out to be some neutral party that isn't entirely involved in the propaganda. S*** like this would have made my blood boil if I had been in the shoes of Eastern employees.
 
Top