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That First Job...

Discussion in 'Flight Control/Dispatch' started by e30guy, Oct 3, 2016.

  1. e30guy

    e30guy Well-Known Member

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    I know that the first dispatching job is the hardest to get, but on average how long did it take everyone to land a job?

    I have been applying to just about everything that I have seen posted but am not doing well. I have gotten a few TBNT emails but for the most part I am hearing nothing from the places I have applied.

    This is a job that I really want to do and I feel that I could really excel at it if I can get the chance. It has just been frustrating to not even be given that chance.

    Are there really that many people looking for a Dispatch job that a fresh certificate holder like myself are not getting the opportunity to prove themselves?

    Ok, back to looking for that first job....
     
  2. Vinnyv88

    Vinnyv88 Active Member

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    I'm not sure what your current job situation is, but have you considered just trying to get in with an airline? I have worked in crew scheduling for 2 airlines and have seen several schedulers make the move.
     
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  3. e30guy

    e30guy Well-Known Member

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    I have definitely considered it, and may have to go that route if something doesn't come up soon.
     
  4. mrezee

    mrezee Living the dream!

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    I would try to get into an airline in any way you can, be it ramp, customer service, crew scheduling, maintenance planning/load planning, etc. Those are just a few of the jobs you can try. It took me about a month after I got my license to get a job, and I believe my 2 years working above- and below-wing at another airline helped with that.

    Ramp jobs are not glamorous, especially if you work for a regional ground handler (DGS, UGE, Envoy) and even more especially if you work for a third-party (Swissport, ATS, WFS, Simplicity). Most crew schedulers aren't huge fans of their job either, but at least you'll have SOC experience. Definitely apply as it will take a bit of time for you to get hired. And if you get picked up for dispatch, you can always quit and do that.
     
  5. womanpilot73

    womanpilot73 Well-Known Member

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    Are you doing anything to set yourself apart from other applicants? Networking is so, so important IMO. Try getting some tours, make some contacts and maintain those contacts. Make a good impression and it could be what gets you in the door for an interview. Also, did you have a professional do your resume? There are some good recommendations in past threads here.

    Don't give up... :)
     
  6. Luigi

    Luigi Well-Known Member

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    I like to send my resume directly to the hiring managers house, possibly addressed to his or her youngest son or daughter. Maybe include a copy of the movie Cape Fear to sweeten the pot...or just let them know what's next...:)
     
  7. That's Affirm

    That's Affirm Has an Active Member

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    I had a very similar experience to you. It took me 8 months to land my first gig after I got my license. I was applying to anyone and everyone that posted and mostly got zero responses. I had a phone interview with Compass, a phone and then face to face with CommutAir and I ended up landing at SkyWest on my second interview attempt with them. I had 8 years experience in a Flight Ops position with UPS at the time I was applying, so I was in the industry, and UPS wanted nothing to do with me as an internal despite my attempts. I had a Bachelor's degree in Aviation and Multiple Pilot licenses. I thought I would be a shoo-in. Hang in there and keep applying, take the rejections as a learning experience, your perseverance will eventually pay off. I ended up only being at SKW for 10 months before I got on with a Major.
     
  8. e30guy

    e30guy Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for your responses, I am deffently keeping my options open.

    I completely understand that it can take some time to get on some where, I was just getting a little frustrated feeling like I am just spinning my wheels.
     
  9. Atc89

    Atc89 ATC89

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    Hey pal.....sent you a pm.
     
  10. Vinnyv88

    Vinnyv88 Active Member

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    Hey, as they say patience is a virtue. I am anxious to get the opportunity as well, haven't even had a phone interview yet. The wife and I are pretty flexible in terms of where we can live, just need to be given the opportunity.
     
    e30guy likes this.
  11. Burrito

    Burrito I'll ask the stupid questions

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    13 months.

    Coming from a 135 operator in New England, where I started straight out of college (and said company had a monopoly at that airport)...I did a bunch of everything before going to flight following and, eventually, getting a dispatch license. Mind you, I obtained the license just over two years ago (so, year 4 of said career) but I was very much on the way into some 121 carrier. Didn't care who, didn't mind where. I just wanted to see what else there was. But, like you, I was impatient. Words of advice from me: don't be. Let it happen as you continue applying everywhere. Keep a running datasheet of where you applied when, making note of results if any come back to you. Your job is getting the job you want, not the job you need. Frankly, the latter isn't any fun.

    I would be very careful going this route. Contract carriers "get the work done" but the airline higher-ups know they're a dime a dozen. You'll have below-wing experience, but I can't stress QOL enough. (Throwing bags / working with 1980s equipment / 50 hour workweeks / outdoor work in every condition) is not for everyone. Even worse, if you fall in love with it, the transition to office life is harsh in and of itself. And, remember, that's a contract carrier on your resume after X amount of time - so while you may have serviced [Airlines] once or twice a day, you aren't working for them.

    I've seen this as well, especially at the larger shops. Flight attendant to ATC is a common one, but I did see Flight Attendant to Dispatcher recently on a UA flight. That was a fun conversation.

    //

    Patience is important. Bunch of us have said it, here and elsewhere, but it bears repeating.
    It'll come, friend. And if you're seeing an airline hiring time and time again...You're probably better off continuing the wait.
     
    manniax likes this.
  12. TF39

    TF39 Well-Known Member

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    24 applications and about 4 months is what it took for me to get my first 121 job, and I consider myself lucky that it only took 4 months. My break happened when one of my classmates got hired at an airline and put in a good word for me (I had actually been rejected by this airline when I applied previously). I applied to everything I could even if I knew I wasn't very competitive without any experience. I did have a couple interviews along the way, but for any number of reasons they didn't result in an offer.

    As for the no-contacts, I know it's frustrating. Of my 24 applications/resume submissions, I had 5 insincere automated rejections and 15 instances where I got no reply whatsoever--even when I sent a resume directly to a manager's e-mail.

    I can say getting my 2nd job was much easier with about 1.5 years of experience to my name. I was much more knowledgeable, confident and relaxed during my interview for my present job. But even with that 1.5 years of experience, I still ran into a few non-major airlines that flat-out ignored my applications. Applying for any job is simply a cold, frustrating experience.

    So keep in contact with your classmates if you can; a personal recommendation by a classmate/employee can do a lot in getting your resume to the top of the pile (and they are big piles...believe me).
     
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  13. PBR me ASAP

    PBR me ASAP Well-Known Member

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    That's old school. Two words. CLOWN SUIT!
    Nothing will get you noticed better at company HQ then crouching in the bushes with resume in hand.
     
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  14. Flying Saluki

    Flying Saluki Well-Known Member

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    It was 179 days between licensure and starting my first job. So my average was 179 days. :) Granted, this is when the internet was in its infancy, and the only way to get a job back then was to shotgun resumes out and hope.

    Have you had any interviews since you started looking?
     
  15. e30guy

    e30guy Well-Known Member

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    I have only had one phone interview so far.
     
  16. manniax

    manniax Well-met in the Ka-tet

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    I personally think a leather bondage suit with hood is a more effective way of showing you're a "team player" to any potential employer. Also, don't forget to bow down in front of the hiring manager, touch your head to the ground, and say "I'M NOT WORTHY!" three times. You want them to remember your interview.
     
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  17. R2D

    R2D ACK

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    My method is very straightforward. When the company mentions the testing and interview is 'business casual,' I wear my finest shirt and tie, along with some athletic shorts representing my favorite college and sandals. It shows you're good at following directions. They like that at my place of employment.

    And don't fret. You'll get where you need to be in time. I once bombed a Skype interview and was very dejected at the time, but it ended up being the greatest thing to happen because I wouldn't have ended up in my current position if I had done well and been offered that job.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2016
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  18. e30guy

    e30guy Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I absolutely know that I will get something and end up in a great position. It is just frustrating sending in all of these applications and never hearing a word back. I completely understand that I am not going to be offered an interview much less a job everywhere I apply but some kind of response would be nice.
     
  19. R2D

    R2D ACK

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    No doubt. Many of the places I applied to I never heard back from. Actually, I would not even get a confirmation email that I applied successfully at many shops. However, I did score an interview or two by emailing the hiring manager/director personally and just getting my name out there. I would meet employees from these companies at work and ask if I could use them as a reference or a contact.
     
  20. A-9er

    A-9er Well-Known Member

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    For me, it took about a month, but I got a lucky break that helped a lot. I graduated from Sheffield May of 2017. I signed up for the workshops when I registered. After school, I was burnt out and didn't want to do them. However, I'd have lost my deposit if I pulled out, so I attended. Not only were the workshops great (learned a LOT!); I met a guy from G7 who was attending the workshops also. He had some business cards from one of the recruiters, and he gave me one. He also told me that they were losing two dispatchers to the majors, and that they'd be hiring soon. I contacted the recruiter and got my stuff in BEFORE the job posted. They flew me out for an interview, got an offer a week or so later, and started on July 11th. If I hadn't met the G7 DXer at the workshop, there's no telling how long it would have taken me to find something...
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017

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