TFR Necessary for Aircraft Incident

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
Looking for help with a work question that came up today. As a part of our airport emergency plan, I was asked about checking to see if a TFR could be established around the airport in the event that an aircraft incident might draw in news helicopter traffic. I responded that I didn't think it was probably necessary since the Airport is in Class C airspace and the tower is active 24-hours (i.e. controllers could just close the airport and divert traffic).

Thoughts? Should I still inquire about TFR activation?
 

Jordan93

Well-Known Member
I agree. At a place like RDU, it shouldn’t be necessary. Really at any towered airport, I don’t think it would be necessary to put a temporary TFR around the airspace. Just broadcast on the ATIS, airport closed due to emergency until XXXXZ and coordinate with approach and center to handle the other aircraft.
 

KSCessnaDriver

Well-Known Member
Looking for help with a work question that came up today. As a part of our airport emergency plan, I was asked about checking to see if a TFR could be established around the airport in the event that an aircraft incident might draw in news helicopter traffic. I responded that I didn't think it was probably necessary since the Airport is in Class C airspace and the tower is active 24-hours (i.e. controllers could just close the airport and divert traffic).

Thoughts? Should I still inquire about TFR activation?
Having flown equipment that carries similar camera tech to what a new helicopter, TFR or not, they're going to get their footage. Either from outside the 3 mile ring you'd presumably get, or from 3000 ft. And even being a Class C, even being denied entry, they'll still get what they want.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
Having flown equipment that carries similar camera tech to what a new helicopter, TFR or not, they're going to get their footage. Either from outside the 3 mile ring you'd presumably get, or from 3000 ft. And even being a Class C, even being denied entry, they'll still get what they want.
There is an argueable reasoning that because of that capability is excluding them is really the smart/safe option.

Yes they are out of the airspace but now they are a non participating aircraft on the edge of your control acting in whatever manner they need to get the shot. Might make more sense to allow access to proximity but “put them in a box” so to speak. Determine positions in the airspace to provide the lowest impact, create memorandums of understanding with local operators, etc. Basically figure out a plan to try and mitigate the crap show.
 

drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
Looking for help with a work question that came up today. As a part of our airport emergency plan, I was asked about checking to see if a TFR could be established around the airport in the event that an aircraft incident might draw in news helicopter traffic.
I don't think avoiding bad publicity is an appropriate use of TFRs. They would just impact other traffic unnecessarily. Approach or Tower should be familiar with how to handle helicopters, and it isn't LA - how many can there possibly be?
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Plenty of news choppers in the NY metro area and they’ve never been an issue with any sort or emergency. Hell during the morning and evening rush hours they’re all up in the EWR B surface area doing traffic reporting. Tower just keeps them out of the way of the normal operation and you don’t even notice them.
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
Thanks - have reached out to the local ATC manager to get his take as well, but good to know my instincts were correct.
 

KSCessnaDriver

Well-Known Member
There is an argueable reasoning that because of that capability is excluding them is really the smart/safe option.

Yes they are out of the airspace but now they are a non participating aircraft on the edge of your control acting in whatever manner they need to get the shot. Might make more sense to allow access to proximity but “put them in a box” so to speak. Determine positions in the airspace to provide the lowest impact, create memorandums of understanding with local operators, etc. Basically figure out a plan to try and mitigate the crap show.
Which is exactly what I did when I was in that position. I had a job to do. If ATC didn't want to help me get it done, I was happy to not talk to them and sit right on the edge of their airspace.
 
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