Swayne coming to a 121 near you

milleR

Well-Known Member
"After a 5 day trip, net displacement was zero because you're back where you started without any tangible benefits." Umm, several thousand dollars richer?
You’re clearly not an entrepreneur.

Leaving a career with BA may seem nuts to you, and that’s fine, but some people have a drive and desire to be more than cogs in a machine and the willingness to risk their livelihood breaking out on their own. Looking down on them says more about you than it does about them.
 
You’re clearly not an entrepreneur.

Leaving a career with BA may seem nuts to you, and that’s fine, but some people have a drive and desire to be more than cogs in a machine and the willingness to risk their livelihood breaking out on their own. Looking down on them says more about you than it does about them.
Eh, why not do both until such time that your new other business has taken off. You know bird in hand and not in the bush? Or just continue to do both and make double the money?
 
Running a business takes a lot of time and effort.
True, but there are lots of examples of pilots who have a profitable side hustle and their airline job is more or less their PT job. And there's always bidding reserve, if you can hold it and live in base.

I'm just not one to take risk and quit a six figure job on thoughts and prayers that my side hustle is going to take off in its infancy. There is no way to recoup that kind of financial loss if the side job goes TU.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
You’re clearly not an entrepreneur.

Leaving a career with BA may seem nuts to you, and that’s fine, but some people have a drive and desire to be more than cogs in a machine and the willingness to risk their livelihood breaking out on their own. Looking down on them says more about you than it does about them.
I did not look down at him, simply that this happened (as in he quit) and the factual statement that even if net zero displacement being back in the parking lot, you're a couple thousand dollar richer.
 

bimmerphile

SuperCritical™ Member
You’re clearly not an entrepreneur.

Leaving a career with BA may seem nuts to you, and that’s fine, but some people have a drive and desire to be more than cogs in a machine and the willingness to risk their livelihood breaking out on their own. Looking down on them says more about you than it does about them.
Maybe in a real business, but to develop an app? Do that on your overnights, maybe until the thing takes off and you can/need to quit your day job.
 

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
You’re clearly not an entrepreneur.

Leaving a career with BA may seem nuts to you, and that’s fine, but some people have a drive and desire to be more than cogs in a machine and the willingness to risk their livelihood breaking out on their own. Looking down on them says more about you than it does about them.
The BA guy later said he took an ex-pat pilot job in Asia after quitting.
 

AAPalmTree

Well-Known Member
You’re clearly not an entrepreneur.

Leaving a career with BA may seem nuts to you, and that’s fine, but some people have a drive and desire to be more than cogs in a machine and the willingness to risk their livelihood breaking out on their own. Looking down on them says more about you than it does about them.
I’m all about “to each his own” BUUUUT
This career ends up paying a lot of money for less and less time worked. That’s time (and the resources) to do what ever it is that makes you, you. I flew some very high net worth individuals in a past life. It was always about time with them. They had all the money and drive you could want. What did they want? More time.
Pilots have the best gig going.
 

Screaming_Emu

Dogsheep
You’re clearly not an entrepreneur.

Leaving a career with BA may seem nuts to you, and that’s fine, but some people have a drive and desire to be more than cogs in a machine and the willingness to risk their livelihood breaking out on their own. Looking down on them says more about you than it does about them.
I am not that people. But I’m glad there are people who get down like that.
 

JordanD

Honorary Member
"After a 5 day trip, net displacement was zero because you're back where you started without any tangible benefits." Umm, several thousand dollars richer?
I had an FO make that point to me, I almost saw it as a positive. Unless you really screw up or maybe once a year around recurrent, this is one of the few jobs where the door doesn’t hit you on the ass when you leave everyday.
Granted, right now I more relate to the guys who made the whining videos, because I’m dumb enough to commute to reserve. When I was a relatively senior FO, it barely felt like work and I loved it, especially looking back on how easy it was and having some schedule control. Now? Well, anybody that talks to me outside of JC knows how much I despise it right now. But eventually it’ll get better.
 

ppragman

Direct Yeska
Trying to explain leaving a captain seat at British Airways to a group of pilots on a website named "jetcareers" is probably like pushing water uphill lol, but I get where the guy is coming from. Being a number on a seniority list just isn't for everyone.
It's hard to derive meaning from your work when you're just a couple in the machine.
 

Cessnaflyer

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
True, but there are lots of examples of pilots who have a profitable side hustle and their airline job is more or less their PT job. And there's always bidding reserve, if you can hold it and live in base.

I'm just not one to take risk and quit a six figure job on thoughts and prayers that my side hustle is going to take off in its infancy. There is no way to recoup that kind of financial loss if the side job goes TU.
If I put 100% effort into being a broker and manager I would be rolling in the dough.

At the heart of it though is that pilots are usually a pretty conservative bunch and don't like taking risks.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
miller,
Being an entrepreneur is fine but you have to look at what you’re giving up. For example, being a 34 yr old Airbus CA at 54% on the list at a legacy, I’d be a fool to quit this and try some startup app business. The risk analysis isn’t worth it. Stay, and retire #3 is way more lucrative.

I get that he isn’t enjoying the job/career but newsflash: this job is the easiest one that pays over 250k. His profile said he’s been at BA for 6 yrs and he looks my age, maybe younger. He would have retired probably top 1% flying 2-3 trips per month on 787/380s around the world.

The proof is in the pudding, as evidenced by him having returned to flying as an expat for a foreign Asian carrier.

If anyone is in these similar shoes, I HIGHLY recommend taking a personal leave. My airline allows a 5 yr personal leave. You retain and accrue seniority and retain (but not accrue) longevity for pay/vacation. Still, you have a seniority number to come back to. 5 years is a LONG time. By then whatever you are trying either works out or doesn’t. This way you don’t have to start over again at a expat pilot job or an airline in your own country at the bottom of the list.
 

milleR

Well-Known Member
miller,
Being an entrepreneur is fine but you have to look at what you’re giving up. For example, being a 34 yr old Airbus CA at 54% on the list at a legacy, I’d be a fool to quit this and try some startup app business. The risk analysis isn’t worth it. Stay, and retire #3 is way more lucrative.

I get that he isn’t enjoying the job/career but newsflash: this job is the easiest one that pays over 250k. His profile said he’s been at BA for 6 yrs and he looks my age, maybe younger. He would have retired probably top 1% flying 2-3 trips per month on 787/380s around the world.

The proof is in the pudding, as evidenced by him having returned to flying as an expat for a foreign Asian carrier.

If anyone is in these similar shoes, I HIGHLY recommend taking a personal leave. My airline allows a 5 yr personal leave. You retain and accrue seniority and retain (but not accrue) longevity for pay/vacation. Still, you have a seniority number to come back to. 5 years is a LONG time. By then whatever you are trying either works out or doesn’t. This way you don’t have to start over again at a expat pilot job or an airline in your own country at the bottom of the list.
I'll let him explain his own reasoning.

 
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