Surviving your first 121 initial training

JordanD

Honorary Member
#22
If you get Study Material before class, take the time to learn it.

Get all your affairs in order BEFORE you leave for training. The last thing you need is to deal with a problem 1000+ miles away that could have been prevented.

Study with someone other than your partner on occasion. as stated 4 people MAX, any more you'll get little to nothing out of it.

Flash Cards apps, like Quizlet and Brainscape are awesome, if you find a deck already made, go through it and make sure it's correct, people make mistakes and limitations change.

Take time to relax and decompress, overloading yourself will catch up to you. Happy Hour Specials with the class is perfect for this. Don't go overboard.

Have a good time and good luck!
All this.

It always seems like there's a bunch of people in both classes I've been in that showed up with medicals that were going to expire or j
I’ve never understood the study in big groups method. For me, it has always been a massive waste of time. I really don’t see how that is remotely helpful.

I do strongly recommend doing your callouts and flows with your sim partner, and have them down cold before you touch the sim. Also have 1-2 people that you can ask questions with as you progress through the program.
This. One or two other people maybe, but "group" study sessions ended up just being a lot of goofing off or two people trying to one up each other on how smart they are.
+1 on the relaxing. If you have a day on a weekend during ground where you can spend most of it NOT thinking about airplanes, I feel like it helps. Maybe still study an hour or two, but my class would try to go out for some beers/catch a movie/baseball game, on occasion when we had time off.
 
#23
I’ve never understood the study in big groups method. For me, it has always been a massive waste of time. I really don’t see how that is remotely helpful.

I do strongly recommend doing your callouts and flows with your sim partner, and have them down cold before you touch the sim. Also have 1-2 people that you can ask questions with as you progress through the program.
I’m the same way. But group study is still good as a way to double check your understanding of things and to help anyone in the group with questions.

Or, at my last new hire training, a way to get drunk and write off studying all together.
 

Skåning

Well-Known Member
#25
Study the memory items and limitations before you even show up for class (if you can get them). That way you can just focus on flows and systems. Also, study hard during the week and stay late after class with an instructor to ask questions or have them talk you through a system - that's what I found to be most helpful.

Lastly, go home on the weekends! Guys will stay and you'll come back Monday and they hadn't really gotten much done. Go see the family and get your head outta the schoolhouse for those two days.
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
#32
When asked "Any questions?" don't say "Ever wonder why they call 'em sperm whales?"
Even innocent "Do you really think we went to the moon?" got me a 20 min lecture on how he thinks we didn't.
Other than that -
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word302

Well-Known Member
#34
When you have a terrible day in the sim (cause you probably will) realize that you are not the worst pilot in the world. It happens to the best of us and the next session is usually much better.
 

JDean3204

Well-Known Member
#36
I’m no genius and made it through 2 121 training programs in a year. My number one nugget of advice is to not overthink or get lost in the details. Everyone I watched stumble through training stressed the small stuff too much. There is going to be a ton of info thrown at you in a small amount of time, you will not learn it all. If you try to learn it all, you will fail. You have time after initial to learn all the details in the FOM and SDM/AOM. I would say out of all the manuals you are required to study and demonstrate knowledge in the FSM is the bread and butter. As said before, if you get flows before class know those down cold before showing up to class. The people who don’t just play catch up the whole time, then wash out and have to start all over again just because they didn’t take the time to learn the first time.
 

BEEF SUPREME

Well-Known Member
#38
Lots of good advice here. Show up well rested. Study for at least an hour preferably two. Errryday. Do things that make you happy. For me its getting lots of exercise in the form of mountain biking. Easier said than done but doable.

Don't drink too much. Without revealing anything about the person. Someone I know got black out drunk and may have ruined his career after getting arrested for being drunk on the weekend. While in newhire class. Don't do that. That would be very dumb. Beer is good. Too much beer is bad.

One thing that has gotten me through procedures and call outs is getting a tennis ball and throwing it against a wall and practicing my call outs. I even go through all the calls during a procedure like an ILS approach while riding my bike on a rowdy downhill. This kind of connects the hand eye and memory for the sim. At least for me.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
#40
You know what helped me a lot? Is recognizing the concept of “is this testable?” There were always people in ground school that asked too many questions or got mired in off-track minutia where I’d panic and wonder “what the deuce? I need to know this?”

Most likely not.

Keep an open mind, stay on topic and remember to work out and drink a couple brewskies when able. It’ll really help.
 
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