Sukhoi Superjet lands on fire, apparently...

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Don't mean to keyboard warrior my way to a firefighters job but wasn't this an incoming emergency aircraft? Asiana was not it just crashed on a beautiful day visual approach. So I don't see how this is comparable.
They were there in under 90 seconds. Don’t really see what there is to criticize?
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Is it taught when there is a fire to come to a stop into the wind so the wind doesn’t push the flames into the exits? Just trying to figure out if that turn at the end of landing was deliberate or just cause they were trying to stop as quickly as possible.

I remember on that British 737 they plane burned through faster than anyone expected because the wind was blowing the flames into the plane.
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
They were there in under 90 seconds. Don’t really see what there is to criticize?
Is it not procedure to have them standing by the runway for any incoming emergency aircraft? Not critiquing, just asking a question. Also just saying that Asiana seems irrelevant to this.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Is it not procedure to have them standing by the runway for any incoming emergency aircraft? Not critiquing, just asking a question. Also just saying that Asiana seems irrelevant to this.
As I said earlier in this thread, they usually stage by the approach end and far enough off the runway that they won’t get hit if you depart it and then “chase” you down the runway. If it takes you a mile to stop, even if they drove 60mph the whole time it would take them a minute to reach you. They don’t know where on the runway you’re going to stop.
 

Autothrust Blue

"Duuuuuude."
Is it taught when there is a fire to come to a stop into the wind so the wind doesn’t push the flames into the exits? Just trying to figure out if that turn at the end of landing was deliberate or just cause they were trying to stop as quickly as possible.

I remember on that British 737 they plane burned through faster than anyone expected because the wind was blowing the flames into the plane.
Such advice appears in various manuals, yes.
 

sweeps

Undercarriage Acuator
Don't mean to keyboard warrior my way to a firefighters job but wasn't this an incoming emergency aircraft? Asiana was not it just crashed on a beautiful day visual approach. So I don't see how this is comparable.
I said the same thing at first as initial reports were it was burning before it landed. Now with the video of it “landing” shows it starts burning when it smacks the pavement so I’m thinking they weren’t called until then.
 

Autothrust Blue

"Duuuuuude."
I said the same thing at first as initial reports were it was burning before it landed. Now with the video of it “landing” shows it starts burning when it smacks the pavement so I’m thinking they weren’t called until then.
That was my initial impression as well (which is why we call it an "initial impression"). ;)
 

Stone Cold

Well-Known Member
I said the same thing at first as initial reports were it was burning before it landed. Now with the video of it “landing” shows it starts burning when it smacks the pavement so I’m thinking they weren’t called until then.
That was my initial impression as well (which is why we call it an "initial impression"). ;)
Also, hence the title of the thread...at least I put "apparently" in there. Now that we have more information, it makes things different.
 

tomokc

Well-Known Member
Is it taught when there is a fire to come to a stop into the wind so the wind doesn’t push the flames into the exits? Just trying to figure out if that turn at the end of landing was deliberate or just cause they were trying to stop as quickly as possible.
After the nosewheel strike, main gear collapse and heavy fire in the rear of the aircraft, I'm not sure what directional control the pilots had at the end of the "rollout."
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
After the nosewheel strike, main gear collapse and heavy fire in the rear of the aircraft, I'm not sure what directional control the pilots had at the end of the "rollout."
I figured that was probably it cause at first it looks to be leaning hard to the left but then when it came to a stop it looked level so I wasn’t sure if it was just an illusion
 

Autothrust Blue

"Duuuuuude."
I figured that was probably it cause at first it looks to be leaning hard to the left but then when it came to a stop it looked level so I wasn’t sure if it was just an illusion
Yeah. I very eagerly want to know what happened that resulted in the bounce, if they had a control issue or some sort of massive avionics failure.
 

Autothrust Blue

"Duuuuuude."
"Ailing tons of machinery..." Etc. Etc.

It'd be nice if you did this, but really just get stopped and get the evac going.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
My simulator stopped and I was forced to redo the RTO once for it. You’re right, though. Stop the jet and GTFO, forthwith

Me: k
 

Old Pete

curmudgeon
As I said earlier in this thread, they usually stage by the approach end and far enough off the runway that they won’t get hit if you depart it and then “chase” you down the runway. If it takes you a mile to stop, even if they drove 60mph the whole time it would take them a minute to reach you. They don’t know where on the runway you’re going to stop.
In the only RTF (smoke) event I’ve had, tower asked if we were going to stop on the runway. I said no, we’re going to exit at the second hi-speed, clear the runway, and come to a full stop. When we stopped they were there. 0 second delay. Absolutely professional. Amazing.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
In the only RTF (smoke) event I’ve had, tower asked if we were going to stop on the runway. I said no, we’re going to exit at the second hi-speed, clear the runway, and come to a full stop. When we stopped they were there. 0 second delay. Absolutely professional. Amazing.
In mine we did the same but beat the trucks there by a couple minutes. No smoke or fire though...



Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 
Top