Student pilot to be sentenced for falsifying flight logs

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
So what else did this guy do to piss off the prosecutor? I have to assume there are tons of guys with BIC time in their logbook "building time," but I've never heard of a prosecution. More like the embarrassment of getting caught logging time for a busted down airplane somewhere on the field.
 

cmill

Cold Ass Honky
So what else did this guy do to piss off the prosecutor? I have to assume there are tons of guys with BIC time in their logbook "building time," but I've never heard of a prosecution. More like the embarrassment of getting caught logging time for a busted down airplane somewhere on the field.
Yeah, seems a little odd that they're trying to put him away for a year.
 

dustoff17

Well-Known Member
I used to fly with a guy that SHOULD be prosecuted for this very thing. He falsified hours on his 8500, 8710, and our company insurance forms too (a level three felony in FL). Makes no sense to me why one would want the risk........
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
There has to be more to this story or big brother is not as busy/short staffed as they claim! He did something that made the FAA go after him like that.
 

starman2112

Well-Known Member
it seems to me like there is something missing from the story, like how the FAA got turned on to this guy. Someone must have turned him in.
 

FlyingScot

Spanish Proficient
Rotor2Wing said:
I think the story said the flight school turned him in.
Yes it did. Sounds like he only attended only one school and figured they would not notice his hours were inflated when he applied for his commercial rating. He might be too stupid to be a pilot.
 

Qutch

Question everything
For a U.S. Federal court? I'm lost on that one.
Use of interpreters is not that unusual in cases like this. If prosecutors had really hoped to put this guy away, or make sure the charges would stick (regardless of the sentence), they'd want to cut off any avenues of appeal. One argument for filing an appeal would be a claim that, as someone who's primary language is Arabic, he did not understand the peculiar terms used in the court proceeding (terms different than everyday English or those used in aviation). The prosecutors, or the Judge might have asked for a Courtroom Certified interpreter. Defense counsels sometimes request the interpreter when they are having trouble communicating with their client, or they wish to cut off a later complaint against them of "inadequate counsel." Sight Translation is another issue. Some people speak a language better than they can read it. Even native English speakers may have trouble reading legal documents presented by the Court. Courtroom Certified interpreters must prove proficiency in Sight Translation of courtroom text, translation into a witness/defendant's native language. MikeD SpiraMirabilis might know something about this courtroom procedure.

http://www.uscourts.gov/FederalCourts/UnderstandingtheFederalCourts/DistrictCourts/CourtInterpreters.aspx

http://www.uscourts.gov/uscourts/FederalCourts/Publications/Guide_Vol05.pdf
.
 
Top