Stormscopes and Strikefinders...

MissedApproach

Well-Known Member
Whats the difference between the two and how do they work? Is range based on signal strength or how is that computated?

Thanks in advance!
 

Eagle

New Member
Stormscopes and Strikefinders are brand names.

The two main types of radar that you will see are Lightning detectors, that just show you where the lighting in is and radar that which will show you the rain in the area. Each has their downsides/limitations.
 

sorrygottarunway

Well-Known Member
my favorite thing in the world is a stormscope... but the problem with the radar function is that it is prone to black-out more significant stormy weather behind initial echoes. If you see a light return directly ahead, you do not know if behind that "cell" there is another, possibly stronger area of precip. It requires some inference, but the best recommendation is to just stay away from the precip, and not fly around it: you could be " coming around the rain bend" and find yourself flying directly towards a new echo, and thus another area of possibly stronger precip.

The ones that determine lightning strikes don't have this weakness, but then again they don't show the precip either. They do tell you where the storms are though...

I think some of the new GARMINS have a combination of the two... I'll have to do some research and get back to you.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
Newer generation stormscopes (strikefinders) may have remedied this problem but on our WX-10 we get a lot of extraneous "strikes." Maybe it needs to be calibrated or overhauled but you really have to learn how to "read" the stormscope. A few dots together is something to keep an eye on ... a complete quadrant or half of the scope covered in green is definately something to avoid.

You can't really use a stormscope to pick through cells but it gives a very good indication of where you shouldn't be.

Strikefinders/Stormscopes are a passive instrument. When static electricity is discharged the antenna on the stormscope picks it up, runs that info through a proprietary computer and displays a dot on the scope. The theory is if you get a lot of dots it's probably a thunderstorm because it's not a thunderstorm without lightning.
 

sorrygottarunway

Well-Known Member
"When static electricity is discharged the antenna on the stormscope picks it up, runs that info through a proprietary computer and displays a dot on the scope. The theory is if you get a lot of dots it's probably a thunderstorm because it's not a thunderstorm without lightning."

_____________________________________

OR Janet Reno is combing her hair, directly ahead on heading 067
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Newer generation stormscopes (strikefinders) may have remedied this problem but on our WX-10 we get a lot of extraneous "strikes."

[/ QUOTE ]

Yeah, I've had that experience with the WX-10 too. The newer BFGoodrich model(s) works much better, in my opinion.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
Interesting ... now ours has decided to go and "flicker" the whole display will "shrink" and "expand" randomly. I think either the gas is going bad or there's someother kind of problem in the display. It still picks up strikes it just will flicker at random intervals.

Gotta love old-tech.
 

C650CPT

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
on our WX-10 we get a lot of extraneous "strikes." Strikefinders/Stormscopes are a passive instrument. When static electricity is discharged the antenna on the stormscope picks it up, runs that info through a proprietary computer and displays a dot on the scope.

[/ QUOTE ]

TMI ...Used in conjunction with a radar system they are ok, but used alone I think they are inconclusive of what is really going on with the atmosphere. They show everything from actuall "lightning" or electrical discharges with in the area, but they also can pick up the static from a fat ladies nylons rubbing together.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
I agree. From what little weather we've exposed it to I've come to think it's only good for vague - and I mean vague - depictions of places you want to head away from.

When the manual says "when taxiing over a burried power cable expect to see a line of dots oriented in the same direction of the cable" you know it's not a precise instrument.
 
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