stanz break

heading180

New Member
Hi everybody. I am about to get my II and they say there is not much of a stanz break. I'm just wondering about the possibilities of other CFI jobs in the area during the wait. Does anybody have any experience in dealing with other FBO's around here i.e. will they hire you during the break? Do you tell them you are "not going back to DCA" even if you are? What is the best FBO to try to work for?
 

husky16

New Member
i don't know the answer for ya but congrats on making through. It is refreshing to actually hear some good news other than what else is said about DCA here.
 

Barlow

Well-Known Member
How long did it take yo to go through that program? Did you start with zero hours and now you have all ratings?
 

heading180

New Member
THank you! .. I came in with my Commercial/Inst/Multi. I did the VFP-IFP proficency course (2-3 weeks) then I did CFI and am just finishing up CFII. I enrolled at the end of April. I took a bit, not much, longer than usual only because I came in with ratings from another school and wanted to make sure I absorbed all the information that was given to me from DCA. I do appreciate the level of knowlege DCA gives me compared to the other school I attended. Having not been held to the standards that DCA holds its students to I felt a bit of extra studying on my part was necessary to ensure I would successfully pass all of the stage checks. That level of knowlege is why I chose DCA. Also, prior to enrollment, I had not flown in 1 1/2 years and was a bit rusty on the knowlege. I enjoy the program, it is a bit difficult to juggle it with my family, only because there really is no schedule for full-time students i.e you are off on your instructors days off, that can change depending on instructor bids, and students do not know what there flight schedule is until 1700 the day prior. Was it worth$ it?.. I don't know yet, I guess the knowlege I have gained I will say yes, I will interview for a CFI position prior to completing my CFII and then I will let you know how I feel :)
 

heading180

New Member
husky16 said:
i don't know the answer for ya but congrats on making through. It is refreshing to actually hear some good news other than what else is said about DCA here.
As far as that goes, I believe that no matter where you go, not just flight schools but in jobs/life in general, there are going to be people who like to complain. I agree that DCA is very pricy and that they are not the only way to get into the seat of a CRJ. Harvard Law is also very pricy compared to University of Tulsa. You can get a law degree from both schools so why not just go with the cheap one right? Why buy Bose headsets when you can get Sigtronics ANR for a fraction of cost? BECAUSE ITS A MATTER OF PERSONAL CHOICE. Walk into any establishment anywhere and ask people if they like their job. Most will say yes but some will say "no" and find every nit pickin detail to complain about from dust on the shelves to a crummy boss. It's what you make of it. Some things you can do something about and some things you can't. One thing is for certain, I did not choose DCA because "they are owned by an airline" or the "guranteed interview", but I will say this, the last school I went to, which was a state university, did not have any connections or resources of job opportunity. They hired you as a CFI and that was it. I am perfectly capable of finding a job on my own but a good recommendation and a good education does "make a difference".
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
"I do appreciate the level of knowlege DCA gives me compared to the other school I attended. Having not been held to the standards that DCA holds its students to I felt a bit of extra studying on my part was necessary to ensure I would successfully pass all of the stage checks. That level of knowlege is why I chose DCA."

Could you not have reached the "DCA standard of knowledge" by putting forth great effort on your own, outside of DCA? I hear you saying it's because you went to DCA that you raised your standards. I'd say having high standards, where ever you train, is a personal choice. I'd also say having high standards isn't having rules about how close you can taxi to a fuel truck or knowing the minimum tire pressure on a 152. If it looks flat, it probably is.

"but I will say this, the last school I went to, which was a state university, did not have any connections or resources of job opportunity. They hired you as a CFI and that was it"

Back in the day, you didn't need special connections. You got your ratings and experience, put in your time, paid your dues, and entered the different levels of the job market based on your qualifications. I don't think things are that much different today....
 

heading180

New Member
It is absolutely a personal choice to set your own goals. Believe me, I hear ya, for me, being around others who have the same goals, and most I should say that have the same level of professionalism helps motivate me to achieve. I am not saying I am not motivated without DCA, I am saying being in an environment that promotes that level of professionalism helps one learn to be a professional.. I can hear your response to this one like "are you saying other FBO's don't promote a professional environment".. but the point is surround yourself with others who are like you and you will be more motivated to pursue greater achievement, atleast from my standpoint. Not everybody is the same. Trump did it his way, Gates did it his way. Neither is right or wrong and both men are successful. Each person makes a choice which best suits that individuals needs. Just because I think one way dosen't mean that everybody else should think the same, and I value others opinions.

Yeah, 152 tire pressure.. haha.. :) .. I also don't think it's necessary to memorize flight experience requirements for different ratings when you can look it up in the book.. I mean, I would not put a student through a program without using the FAR to make absolutely sure I have provided the most current and correct information, but those are building blocks. Like math.. we don't learn Trig to go out and fly using SIN, COSIN etc.. but we learn it to learn problem solving.

My dad would say to me as a child "son, you are judged by the company you keep".. and I belive that. I also believe that you act like the people that are closest to you. We are all influenced by others, no matter how strong, stubborn, or driven we are.
 

hobo

New Member
harvard law eh?

sorry but law schools are far different from the field of aviation. going to harvard law or any of the top 8 schools for law means you knew someone or your dad is someone and you will be a partner at one of the top 5 firms in the nation and make millions and millions like john edwards. going to tulsa law youll be a hometown lawyer and make 50k to 100k. compared to aviation where you can go to dca and spend 100k and get to the right seat of a crj or go to ocala fbo get the same hours and go to the same seat of a crj but for half the price.

its still a personal choice where you go and im not trying to nit pick or just complain. I like the training I received at DCA and a lot of the instructors are good but no one ever told me a single thing that I couldnt find in either the PHAK, AFH, faraim, or the instrument guide to flying. four books that ive read on my own and the same stuff i would have learned any where else.

awesome that you finished and good luck as an instructor
 

heading180

New Member
I agree! It's not so much the knowlege that the instructors have given me that has influenced me so much.. It's the environment. ..
 

Zoid01CMH

New Member
heading180 said:
Hi everybody. I'm just wondering about the possibilities of other CFI jobs in the area during the wait. Does anybody have any experience in dealing with other FBO's around here i.e. will they hire you during the break? Do you tell them you are "not going back to DCA" even if you are? What is the best FBO to try to work for?
I would suggest looking into Falcon Flight next to StarPort - I've known guys who have gone over there on their stanz break - they seem to be OK with the fact that you will be there for a short time while you are waiting to get the white uniform. Plus, where ever you go, you get that credit for dual given off of your 800 hours :)
 

heading180

New Member
Thank You for the reply. I will check it out. Sorry it took so long to Reply; Its been a crazy week. Anyway, I passed my CFII FAA today so the hunt is on.
 

heading180

New Member
Thanks... I'm sortof feeling lost now...haha.. i have interview day set up for 11/8.. :) by the way are you a cfi at dca?
 

MuscleShirt

New Member
Zoid01CMH said:
I would suggest looking into Falcon Flight next to StarPort - I've known guys who have gone over there on their stanz break - they seem to be OK with the fact that you will be there for a short time while you are waiting to get the white uniform. Plus, where ever you go, you get that credit for dual given off of your 800 hours :)
180-
Falcon would be my suggestion as well. They are always busy over there, they have good aircraft, they pay well, and from what I understand Vic is a great person to work for. Just don't get frustrated by the fact that you may have to sit around the office there for a week or two in order to start getting some flight time, be patient. GOOD LUCK!
 

Zoid01CMH

New Member
heading180 said:
Thanks... I'm sortof feeling lost now...haha.. i have interview day set up for 11/8.. :) by the way are you a cfi at dca?

Im a CFI student/candidate at DCA

Good Luck at the Interview!!
 

Red_Baron

New Member
Your Wasting Your TIme With DCA

I am a graduate of DCA and I have talked to some instructors there that only have gotten 150 hours in 4 months. Go to a FBO, Get Hired by them. Dont let DCA make you think their way is the only way. Right now as of 11/03/2005 Express Jet is hiring with 600 total time and 100 multi. DCA is full of crap! Explore your options!!!!
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
"Dont let DCA make you think their way is the only way"

But don't you know that being owned by Delta means everything? You're making a big mistake....
 

Zoid01CMH

New Member
Red_Baron said:
I am a graduate of DCA and I have talked to some instructors there that only have gotten 150 hours in 4 months. Go to a FBO, Get Hired by them. Dont let DCA make you think their way is the only way.

So, my question is... would those instructors get any more time at an FBO - my guess is maybe - I know instructors that fall into this group. They are the types that kinda sit back and wait for the hours to come to them. I also know a few instrutors that have done 800 hours in 13-14 months - but they were picking up flights from other instructors who wern't wanting to fly for whatever reason - but they are gone now - off to fly faster things - and those 150 hours in 4 month guys are still there.

DCA is no different than any other job out there (in or out of the aviation industry) - you get out what you put in - motivation and a little dedication goes a little ways.

Just my opinion :)
 

MuscleShirt

New Member
Zoid01CMH said:
So, my question is... would those instructors get any more time at an FBO - my guess is maybe - I know instructors that fall into this group. They are the types that kinda sit back and wait for the hours to come to them. I also know a few instrutors that have done 800 hours in 13-14 months - but they were picking up flights from other instructors who wern't wanting to fly for whatever reason - but they are gone now - off to fly faster things - and those 150 hours in 4 month guys are still there.


Just my opinion :)
I agree with you 100%! For example, my housemate was hired in July of 2004. He was released at the end of August this year, completed bridge in October, and is now awaiting his ExpressJet class date of December 12th. Some have finished in evan shorter time than that as well. Getting 800 hours in a year is good for a CFI working anywhere in the industry! It can be done, just stay motivated.
 
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