SR22 down off the coast.

DPApilot

GUYSH! GUYSH! GUYSH!
It was apparently flying to HEF. @Boris Badenov and I heard it all the way down. Was intercepted and followed all the way down. Extremely eerie hearing altitude readouts from the fighter jet saying 'pull your chute immediately!' Hoping for the best if anyone knows. Had been trying to get ahold of him for some time prior to the intercept.


https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N930RH
 

IslandFly

Active Member
Doesn't sound good. :(

Went up to FL210... This stuff happens way too often. Hope for the best, though.
I was just doing some research on the SR22. It doesn't appear to be pressurized and has a service ceiling of 17,500'. What was he doing up there...
 

Boris Badenov

Someone should definitely do *something*, Captain!
Certainly a strange experience to hear it transpire. Tension in the voice of the intercept pilot was darn near palpable.
 

A Life Aloft

Well-Known Member
Found this little blurb from the NTSB's twitter account: "NTSB investigating today's crash of a Cirrus SR22 into the Atlantic Ocean about 50 miles from Wallops Island, VA." and "searching in the Atlantic about 50 miles east of Wallops Island."

And one local newsfeed: "The plane is a single-engine Cirrus (tail number N930RH) registered to Ronald Hutchinson of Brookfeld, Wis., according to Federal Aviation Administration records."

Then this:
"According to Peter Knudson with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the plane was on a flight path from Waukesha, Wisconsin to Manassas, Virginia.

The plane went without contact with air traffic control for over 90 minutes, diverged from its flight path and crashed into the ocean.

Knudson did not have any information on if the plane has been located or if any of its occupants have been found."

Hope there is a good outcome, but it doesn't sound promising. Damn.

Edit just saw this from a local news feed there:

RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) -
A Cirrus SR22 recreational plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean Saturday, about 50 miles from Wallops Island, Va. The Coast Guard reported one person was on board.

A Coast Guard team from Elizabeth City, N.C. responded to the crash site, and the NTSB signaled Saturday afternoon it has started an investigation into the crash.

This is a developing story that will be updated as the Coast Guard provides more information this evening.
 
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Screaming_Emu

Great and Unmatched Wisdom
That would actually explain the strange ATC delay we got from DTW-IAD.

"You got about a 30 min delay."

"So about a 55 wheels up?"

"No, they said they'd call us with an update in 30."

"So a ground stop?"

"No."
 

A Life Aloft

Well-Known Member
Grim.

A Cirrus SR22 recreational plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean Saturday, 51 miles southeast of Chincoteague Island, Va. The Coast Guard reported one person was on board.

Sources with knowledge of the initial investigation say it is highly likely the pilot is dead.

According to the NTSB, the plane took off from Waukesha, Wisc. and was scheduled to land in Manassas, Va.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard 5th District in Portsmouth, Va. received notification at approximately 2:40 p.m. that a single-engine aircraft with only the pilot aboard failed to land at Manassas Regional Airport as scheduled.

Instead the Cessna
(?) remained at an altitude of approximately 13,000 feet and continued into restricted air space near Washington, D.C.

Two U.S. F-16 aircraft came alongside the Cessna to investigate and observed the pilot to be unconscious in the cockpit.

The F-16 airmen escorted the Cessna on its course over the Eastern Shore of Virginia until it eventually ran out of fuel and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean.


The Coast Guard launched an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew and an HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Air Station Elizabeth City in North Carolina and the crew of Cutter Beluga, homeported in Virignia Beach, to respond.

RIP
 
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A Life Aloft

Well-Known Member
I have no idea why some of the media keeps reporting the plane as a Cessna either. Pretty pathetic. One would think they perform a ten second Google search, but apparently not. I am just thinking of the pilot's family and what could have happened to him. Did he have a stroke or heart attack, or some other issue. I can't imagine how awful it must have been for the F-16 pilots who tried their best to rouse/get a response from the pilot, how helpless they must have felt and how they honorably stayed with him until the very end. Sad circumstances all the way around.
 
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Apophis

Resident Iconoclast
I was just doing some research on the SR22. It doesn't appear to be pressurized and has a service ceiling of 17,500'. What was he doing up there...
Because the SR-22 has a turbocharged version (SR22T) with an available factory oxygen system and a service ceiling of 25,000.
 
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