Sponsored CFI training?

SkyWalker1992

Well-Known Member
Are there any schools in the MLB, VRB, FPR, SUA area that offer to pay for your instructor ratings in exchange for X amount of work? I know Flight Safety Academy used to, but they recently suspended the program while I was finishing up my commercial ratings. I got my multi add-on instead of CFI/CFII after my single because FS required it for their program. I'm still going to ask them, but I'd like a plan B. I'm a highly motivated, hard working individual and I'm not the worst pilot. I would love the opportunity to become an instructor!
 

kryan11

Well-Known Member
I saw that CAE Oxford was offering sponsored flight instructor programs in return for 3 years of flight instructing there. I don't think it would be worth it personally, but that's an option.
 

Jordan93

Well-Known Member
You can call around and see. At my flight school, most of the employees who are working towards ratings get billed on their account and then the owner just works out a payment plan with them by taking $50, $75, $100, etc out of each paycheck.
 
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n156499000

Titanius Anglesmith
I saw that CAE Oxford was offering sponsored flight instructor programs in return for 3 years of flight instructing there. I don't think it would be worth it personally, but that's an option.
If you have 500 hours total or less and they put you in the MPL program, three years is about how long it would take to get to 1500. Most of the instructors in the MPL program are averaging about 350-380 flight hours per year.
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
Most of the instructors in the MPL program are averaging about 350-380 flight hours per year.
Yeah I'm sorry but that's garbage.

Unfortunately, if you want a program that will pay for your CFI in return to work I think you'll have to branch out of a specific small area. I do want to warn you, don't settle on something outrageous. Like @kryan11 said...3 year contracts and etc are a long time and usually not worth it. Max it should take you to get your hours is 2 years if you're at a small school. My suggestion is save up some money now, get your CFI at a cheap fast program (honestly, most of it is at home study that cost $0!!!) and if you can relocate to good hours and good money.


CFI's are in demand...you can make decent on your investment. Just don't settle for those "we'll pay for your CFI" contracts because they're usually not worth it.
 

n156499000

Titanius Anglesmith
Oh I agree it's lousy, and most of us have also branched out into flying in other programs to supplement our hour build. But, once thing about the MPL program at CAE is, for me at least, you can't beat the pay. Nearly $60k a year for a flight instructor has been quite nice.

There's a few guys here on the 3 year CFI contract, not a single one of them is planning on staying the full three years and all are planning on leaving early once they get their 1500.
 

drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
(honestly, most of it is at home study that cost $0!!!) and if you can relocate to good hours and good money.
Totally agree. You don't need to pay someone to tell you what to study. There is zero dual instruction required for any CFI practical test, just find someone to do spin training with. As a CFI, you need to be able to know what students need to learn, a good place to start is learning it on your own.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
Totally agree. You don't need to pay someone to tell you what to study. There is zero dual instruction required for any CFI practical test, just find someone to do spin training with. As a CFI, you need to be able to know what students need to learn, a good place to start is learning it on your own.
See, this is interesting to me. You can basically use the PTS as a framework/syllabus for what you need to teach, correct?
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
See, this is interesting to me. You can basically use the PTS as a framework/syllabus for what you need to teach, correct?
Absolutely. The PTS alone is the most important book to study with. Like I told myself, if I can answer every line item on the PTS I will pass the checkride. That strategy worked out great for me.
 

drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
See, this is interesting to me. You can basically use the PTS as a framework/syllabus for what you need to teach, correct?
Yes, but I would consider the PTS as the bare minimum of everything you must cover. But everything stems from there, and the FARs. Especially the requirements for every certificate and rating.
 

SkyWalker1992

Well-Known Member
Yeah I'm sorry but that's garbage.

Unfortunately, if you want a program that will pay for your CFI in return to work I think you'll have to branch out of a specific small area. I do want to warn you, don't settle on something outrageous. Like @kryan11 said...3 year contracts and etc are a long time and usually not worth it. Max it should take you to get your hours is 2 years if you're at a small school. My suggestion is save up some money now, get your CFI at a cheap fast program (honestly, most of it is at home study that cost $0!!!) and if you can relocate to good hours and good money.


CFI's are in demand...you can make decent on your investment. Just don't settle for those "we'll pay for your CFI" contracts because they're usually not worth it.
Yeah I think you're right. I've gotten this far by myself. Depending on someone else is what got me into this situation to begin with. I'm kicking myself hard for getting my multi instead of my CFI/CFII. I did my instrument and commercial without ground school. I'm pretty disciplined with home study. I just feel a little overwhelmed right now and don't know where to start.
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
Yeah I think you're right. I've gotten this far by myself. Depending on someone else is what got me into this situation to begin with. I'm kicking myself hard for getting my multi instead of my CFI/CFII. I did my instrument and commercial without ground school. I'm pretty disciplined with home study. I just feel a little overwhelmed right now and don't know where to start.
I think it's normal to feel overwhelmed until the checkrides are done. I'd just open up the PTS and go through each category item...but studying it in more detail than you would for commercial. Be able to speak about it to someone that doesn't know anything. That and FOI is pretty much it. Also, get the awful writtens out of the way. You can start there.

I'll edit to add- like @drunkenbeagle said the AC61-65F is also very important for the initial. Just know what endorsements your students will need for the rating they'll be applying for. Don't memorize the endorsement just which ones they need. That was important on my initial.
 
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drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
I think it's normal to feel overwhelmed until the checkrides are done. I'd just open up the PTS and go through each category item...but studying it in more detail than you would for commercial. Be able to speak about it to someone that doesn't know anything. That and FOI is pretty much it. Also, get the awful writtens out of the way. You can start there.
And don't forget the relevant Advisory Circulars, particularly on Spins, Traffic Patterns, and Flight Reviews. Plus the FAR/AIM, and the relevant FAA handbooks. Should take about a month of part-time study.
 

SkyWalker1992

Well-Known Member
Would anyone recommend getting the CFII first? I'm under the impression that it does not have to be done in a complex plane, making it a little more cost effective and accessible (since there are not many single complex planes in my area)
 

drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
Would anyone recommend getting the CFII first? I'm under the impression that it does not have to be done in a complex plane, making it a little more cost effective and accessible (since there are not many single complex planes in my area)
I would just do the CFI-Airplane first. I doubt it would make any difference, but there is a lot more book knowledge to be on top of for the CFI-I
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
Would anyone recommend getting the CFII first? I'm under the impression that it does not have to be done in a complex plane, making it a little more cost effective and accessible (since there are not many single complex planes in my area)
I did that. Depends on what knowledge you're more comfortable with. I was more comfortable with IFR so I made my initial easier by doing that.

The add-on will be a little bit easier since you won't have to do FOI....but I took my add-on 14 days later. If you just get CFI-I it's kinda useless to employers so they'll want CFI-A done. You are correct...no complex which also made it easier.

Keep in mind though that a lot of companies out there will pay for your CFI-I training at a reduced cost if you're working for them...or just give you employee rates for rental...still a deal. My current shop gives out a free CFI-I and $5k sign on for a year....nothing like 3 years or docked pay some other contracts have. Pretty good deal especially if getting the CFI-I isn't financially feasible. Up to you though. I say if you have enough saved for both, just do both on your own dime....then you'll be employable everywhere.
 
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