Special things to remember on your IFR checkride thread.....

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
Okay...I'll start....

1. Don't forget to monitor the ADF station ident on your NDB approach. My last student didn't catch it when the examiner turned off the ADF receiver.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
From http://www.geocities.com/mike_shiflett/instrument_notes.htm :

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"Not Being able to show the required inspections and AD compliance in the aircraft logbooks

Not being able to tell when the inspections expire

How to tell if a piece of equipment is necessary for flight in a particular airplane.

Lost Communication procedures - Read the regulation and don't forget the last sentence of the regulation "on each route segment"

Maintaining at or above mandatory altitudes printed on approach chats.

Not identifying NAV aids, in particular the DME

Not testing both COMM radios prior to taking off into IFR

Never resetting the heading indicator after taking off.

Not knowing that there are some airports that can never be used as an alternate or that some have different minimums or that some approaches are not authorized at the alternate airport.

Departure procedures - How to get out of an uncontrolled airport under IFR. In particular what procedure to follow.

Not paying enough attention to the back side of the IFR approach plate (Airport layout side) in Jeppesen approach charts

Not being aware of where you are on the approach until it's too late.

Memorizing the approaches so that it's more like an approach type rating rather than an instrument rating you're getting.

The principle of operation of all the navigation receivers you are going to use and in particular how they can fail. Note the difference between how the VOR and Localizer work. They are totally different so when you're doing your VOR test, it's not testing the Localizer at all."

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MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
If the examiner is a jerk, just throw my IFR quiz questions at him.
 

bluelake

Well-Known Member
my DE told me that if the air is calm and your asked to do a timed compass turn to 90 or 270 heading, theres no need to do the math cuz (as we all know) there isnt any compass error at that position.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
my DE told me that if the air is calm and your asked to do a timed compass turn to 90 or 270 heading, theres no need to do the math cuz (as we all know) there isnt any compass error at that position.


[/ QUOTE ]

OSUN (Overshoot South, Undershoot North) doesn't apply to compass turns (not necessarily a timed turn; separate concept here) to east or west.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Well, isnt that one of the reason's one would TIME a turn? because of the compass error??

[/ QUOTE ]

Normally for standard compass error, one would either overshoot the turn if turning to a northerly heading, or undershoot the turn if turning to a southerly heading, ie- OSUN. That means for turns to, say, 290 or 070 (northerly), one would overshoot the turn by about 10 degrees, and the compass would roll back to the correct heading. If turning to a 350 or 010 heading, overshoot by about 30 degrees and you'll be safe. Same for southerly turns, but undershoot them. BL is: the closer you're rolling out to east or west, the lesser you have to over/undershoot.

Timed turns are for when your DG or compass, or both, are inop. By setting a 3 degree/second turn rate (or standard rate turn), you can hack the clock, roll into a turn, set standard rate and by counting the seconds elapsed, know how much heading change has gone by.

MD
 

bluelake

Well-Known Member
Oh, ok. I see what your saying. Your correct.

What actually happened on my checkride was my DE said turn from 290 (something around there) to 090 when the DG was covered up. PResumably the solution to this in terms of the PTS tasks is to demonstrate a timed turn. I fumbled and hit mental block on figuring out how many seconds of a turn that would be. You know how it is on a 'ride right?
:)

Anyways, on the ground he told me that in that scenario there wasnt any reason to figure the time because since at 090 there is no (UNOS) error, then ya can just plant yourself into a standard rate turn and roll out onto the 090.

It was from that experience I have sort of put the two concepts together into one practical perspective. Now... my freaght dog buddy says thats all bunk 'cuz cuz its likely that the same time this is all happening.. your bouncing around in the clouds and the mag compass is swinging wildly... going back to the more basic timed / standard rate turn, as you mentioned.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]

Anyways, on the ground he told me that in that scenario there wasnt any reason to figure the time because since at 090 there is no (UNOS) error, then ya can just plant yourself into a standard rate turn and roll out onto the 090.

. Now... my freaght dog buddy says thats all bunk 'cuz cuz its likely that the same time this is all happening.. your bouncing around in the clouds and the mag compass is swinging wildly... going back to the more basic timed / standard rate turn, as you mentioned.

[/ QUOTE ]

Examiner is right. You could've done either a timed turn or OSUN in the case of the DG being inop and in relatively smooth air. I personally would've compassed it, but it's all the same in that case.

In the situation your buddy describes he's right; timed turns would be really your only recourse, since the bouncing compass will have little accuracy.
 
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