Southwest Airlines dropping peanuts from its flights

///AMG

Well-Known Member
#47
I follow the hygiene hypothesis and inability of immune systems to cope. I think we need to stop protecting the children and get them to eat diverse foods and play outside again. Then in a few generations, we can have baggies of peanuts that we take to our space colonies.
I don't know what the answer is, and I do think parents have somewhat jumped to very quick quasi "diagnoses" of ___-allergy. That being said, there are people with legitimate, potentially life threatening allergies. My Aunt has gone into anaphylactic shock due to her peanut allergy, which was diagnosed when she was a kid in the 1940/early 1950's, a time that probably most of us equate with playing outside (maybe not as much eating diverse foods I suppose). She has described even the smell of peanut anything triggering a pretty significant response, though I'd imagine that is less dangerous than actual physical contact. Personally, I am pretty allergic to grass pollen in high enough concentrations. I spent all my childhood playing outside, running through fields with fresh grass taller than my head, and paying the price for it all night afterwards. Basic allergy meds changed my life in the early summer, though I've only had this reaction really in the PNW, and nowhere else that I have lived since.

But I DO think that with respect to foods, kids are being misdiagnosed. And some parents just assume that some rash they have from sensitive skin is obviously allergy to XYZ.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
#49
There is probably some Darwinian component to the peanut thing. Back in the 1800s, if you a severe allergic reaction, you just up and died. They probably called it something quaint, like "the bloats" or "the bugaboos" or whatever.

Or it could just be that with the intrawebz we just notice it's more of a thing.
 

Cessnaflyer

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
#50
I don't know what the answer is, and I do think parents have somewhat jumped to very quick quasi "diagnoses" of ___-allergy. That being said, there are people with legitimate, potentially life threatening allergies. My Aunt has gone into anaphylactic shock due to her peanut allergy, which was diagnosed when she was a kid in the 1940/early 1950's, a time that probably most of us equate with playing outside (maybe not as much eating diverse foods I suppose). She has described even the smell of peanut anything triggering a pretty significant response, though I'd imagine that is less dangerous than actual physical contact. Personally, I am pretty allergic to grass pollen in high enough concentrations. I spent all my childhood playing outside, running through fields with fresh grass taller than my head, and paying the price for it all night afterwards. Basic allergy meds changed my life in the early summer, though I've only had this reaction really in the PNW, and nowhere else that I have lived since.

But I DO think that with respect to foods, kids are being misdiagnosed. And some parents just assume that some rash they have from sensitive skin is obviously allergy to XYZ.
I fully understand. There has been research on both sides of the hygiene hypothesis that is really good. It is very interesting what our immune system is capable of doing in our body. My Grandfather was an oncologist and researched and studied immunotherapy very heavily which was intertwined with some allergy work as well back then. Our body is very capable of fighting nearly everything that can harm our body it just has to be supported to help it in the fight. When that doesn't work you can move to a hybrid approach that also uses the harsher treatments like chemotherapy to treat the cancer.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#51
I don't know what the answer is, and I do think parents have somewhat jumped to very quick quasi "diagnoses" of ___-allergy. That being said, there are people with legitimate, potentially life threatening allergies. My Aunt has gone into anaphylactic shock due to her peanut allergy, which was diagnosed when she was a kid in the 1940/early 1950's, a time that probably most of us equate with playing outside (maybe not as much eating diverse foods I suppose). She has described even the smell of peanut anything triggering a pretty significant response, though I'd imagine that is less dangerous than actual physical contact. Personally, I am pretty allergic to grass pollen in high enough concentrations. I spent all my childhood playing outside, running through fields with fresh grass taller than my head, and paying the price for it all night afterwards. Basic allergy meds changed my life in the early summer, though I've only had this reaction really in the PNW, and nowhere else that I have lived since.

But I DO think that with respect to foods, kids are being misdiagnosed. And some parents just assume that some rash they have from sensitive skin is obviously allergy to XYZ.
We need a public education (read beatings) on what the threshold separating Allergy vs Intolerance is.

If you’re carrying an Epipen or similar because your throat closes up from exposure, yes tell your waitress you have an allergy.

If you’re just an attention hound who needs to feel special with the conditions you demand on food prep because you eat bread and feel “funny” afterward, go to a restaurant that caters to you and people with your kind of crazy.


I had some lady sitting behind me at a place send her steak and steamed vegetables back because the waitress couldn’t confirm it wasn’t prepared near any sources of gluten... Woman had to be 300 lbs. Gluten is not gonna be the thing that kills her.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
#52
Mmm, I just had a bag of delicious peanuts on my commute to work.

One of our friends is “Gluten Free” but she doesn’t have celiac. I tried to tell her that when he claims a gluten intolerance that magically goes away when there’s booze and drunk pizza involved, she’s making it harder for people that have an actual disease because the presumption is “Oh, suuuuuure you’ve got a gluten intolerance”.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
#53
A friend was standing behind a lady at Subway (I'll refrain from any value judgements there) where she made a big stink about the sandwich artist to change his gloves to ensure that he hadn't touched any non-vegan items when he made her sandwich.

She then proceed to order mayo on the sandwich. My friend couldn't contain himself and pointed out that mayo is made from eggs. She refused to believe him so he showed her the wiki page, whereupon she broke down in tears.

If some attention hound with daddy issues wants to call themselves vegan because it makes them feel special, I'm totally fine with that, and it depresses, in a very marginal way, my dietary costs. But at least make sure what you're eating complies with whatever phony balony system you profess to follow.
 
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