Skywest Questions

n156499000

Titanius Anglesmith
This is good info, thanks! I actually live in MSP and have family in ORD, so those are my first two choices. First, I need to decide if the pros of being at ORD outweigh having to commute. It sounds like the lines are better, with fewer legs and even a few Mexican routes. Is it all United flying, though?
ORD has it's share of 4, 5, and 6 leg days, just as MSP does. Plus, for reserves, ORD has the added benefit of landing on a UAX flight and getting a call from crew support telling you that you have 30 minutes to run across the airport and work an Eagle flight. Both bases, once you have the seniority, have plenty of trips with only 2 or 3 legs per day. They are out there, it's just gonna take time to build the seniority for you to hold them. I work quite a few 2 and 3 leg days in MSP. My next four day trip is 5/2/2/3. Day one is annoying for sure, but only two legs are long enough to be service flights so not a whole lot of work for my lone FA.

I want to fly for Delta eventually, so it would be nice to be able to say that I'm already representing Delta as a SkyWest FA.
Yeah, as previously mentioned, that doesn't matter. In fact, from folks I know who are DL FAs, you'd have better luck getting a job as a gate agent for DL then becoming a FA than being a FA for a subcontractor regional doing DL Connection flights and then getting a job at DL.

Second, I want to rank the other 18 domiciles in a way that makes it more likely that I get the easy-to-commute-to base with trips that have longer legs and fewer legs per day, and less likely that I will get stuck at LGA or DTW.
If you live in MSP (and for reasons I could never fathom actually LIKE it), don't go chasing better lines by commuting. Once you get senior enough MSP has quite a few good lines and even on reserve I haven't had too many trips with more than 4 legs in one day. Living in base "is the bee's knees... the wasp's nipples. [It] is, I would go so far as to say, the entire set of erogenous zones of every major flying insect of the Western world" as one would say.

No commute is easy. They can be managed, tolerated, and indeed preferred if you have zero desire to live in the base city, but it won't be made any easier when you first start and are at the bottom of the standby list, cannot jumpseat, and are constantly under threat of being written up at an airline that actively discourages FAs from commuting during their first year. If you live in MSP, want to live in MSP, and don't wanna hate your life, don't commute.
 

JordanD

Honorary Member
I mean, I primarily bid 8hr two-leg locals. So for me, it’s the right airline at the moment. If I started having to fly 4+ legs a day, I’d probably go somewhere else or do something else.

-Fox
LGA CA is calling your name ;)
 

n156499000

Titanius Anglesmith
Right? SkyWest CRJ in Eagle colors park what, at G gates? Where's the UX CRJ park?MQ CRJ are anywhere from G to L stinger, phone is chirping happy songs about the daily steps.
I've worked UAX CRJs out of E and F gates, the E175s get to park in B and C from what I see. I've seen UAX CRJ-700s at the lower numbered C gates, though not sure if they are ours or others. I've worked OO Eagle flights out of G, H (1 and 2 only), and the old L gates. I seem to usually be at L6 or L10, but I've been spread all out over T3 in OO Eagle CRJs it seems.
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
I've worked UAX CRJs out of E and F gates, the E175s get to park in B and C from what I see. I've seen UAX CRJ-700s at the lower numbered C gates, though not sure if they are ours or others. I've worked OO Eagle flights out of G, H (1 and 2 only), and the old L gates. I seem to usually be at L6 or L10, but I've been spread all out over T3 in OO Eagle CRJs it seems.
T3 has been fun lately. When I got there early last year, G gates were MQ 145s plus OO, 175s were being parked at the old L and then the new L, and the MQ CRJ was mostly G, H1/2. Now it's a mixed bag, been at Gs, H1/2, K2, some old and mostly new L. New bus that goes to G20 and occasionally L24 from one parking lot and K19 from the other really helps the step count.
 

Rodger Wilco

Well-Known Member
This is good info, thanks! I actually live in MSP and have family in ORD, so those are my first two choices. First, I need to decide if the pros of being at ORD outweigh having to commute. It sounds like the lines are better, with fewer legs and even a few Mexican routes. Is it all United flying, though? I want to fly for Delta eventually, so it would be nice to be able to say that I'm already representing Delta as a SkyWest FA.

Second, I want to rank the other 18 domiciles in a way that makes it more likely that I get the easy-to-commute-to base with trips that have longer legs and fewer legs per day, and less likely that I will get stuck at LGA or DTW.
If you live in MSP... and you can get MSP right out of class... with no moving... and no commuting... and cheaper cost of living... working Delta flights... (least hectic) I think that MSP would be your best bet. At least, initially. Then once you have some seniority you can consider other domiciles at you leisure and pick the right one for you. Why commute and add stress and anxiety?

You have heard it before, ill say it again; seniority is everything! Being the most junior person in domicile on reserve will suck no matter what domicile that is. Movement in MSP is not as fast as it once was but it is still moving pretty fast. 15 year TUS FA is on reserve. FA pay first year is miserable as you know, if you are commuting and paying for a crash pad, and buying food a t restaurants, you are going to have a poor experience. MSP you wouldn't be on reserve that long and despite popular opinion, there are some very nice trips out of MSP.

Maybe Im just a grumpy guy too old for the fun of crash pads and living out of a suitcase staying out all night, but thats my 2 cents.
 
Wrong airline for that.
Not much I can do about that. Getting a job as an FA isn't like getting a job as a pilot. There is no FA shortage, so it is super competitive. Obviously much harder and more expensive to become a pilot, but it seems like if you have what it takes to make it, you are basically guaranteed a job in the end.
Oh agreed. 5 leg days in the ATL system are always more pleasant than the similar trips in the upper midwest. Then again, 5 leg days where I don't leave the state of California aren't bad either, well, except for SFO...
Do you mean the weather or something else? I already live in MSP, so the weather in the upper midwest is already a part of my lifestyle :/
San Diego seems like the base for you...

YMMV

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
Does SAN have the early show plus late release problem referenced below?
They were, at one point, requiring no-commute letters from new hire flight attendants. Don't know if they still are. And I don't know how vigorously they were enforced.
I know they say you have to relocate, but, honestly, I don't know many people who can afford to sell their house and move their family across country for a minimum wage job. I have heard that it is pretty easy to transfer to MSP, so this is all just in order to get the best possible base for my first few months.
Generally: anywhere that is an outstation is going to have very early shows and very late release times. This is because SkyWest likes having pilot bases in places where maintenance is done, and thus, the schedules lend themselves to 'first flight out, last flight in' in those places.
This is super useful, thanks! I'll make a point of putting all of the outstations last, especially the ones that are also maintenance bases or line stations.
I work quite a few 2 and 3 leg days in MSP. My next four day trip is 5/2/2/3. Day one is annoying for sure, but only two legs are long enough to be service flights so not a whole lot of work for my lone FA.
I hadn't thought about short flights being no service flights. That does make the idea of 5 legs in a day more bearable, especially if it's just one day in a four day trip.
Yeah, as previously mentioned, that doesn't matter. In fact, from folks I know who are DL FAs, you'd have better luck getting a job as a gate agent for DL then becoming a FA than being a FA for a subcontractor regional doing DL Connection flights and then getting a job at DL.
I hear that, but I'm absolutely not willing to work 40 hours a week for an unknown period of time just to try for DL FA once each year. It is really weird to me that people say this, though. I can't imagine how doing the exact same job in a position where the public perceives you as a Delta employee doesn't make them think you would be a good fit for the job.
If you live in MSP (and for reasons I could never fathom actually LIKE it), don't go chasing better lines by commuting. Once you get senior enough MSP has quite a few good lines and even on reserve I haven't had too many trips with more than 4 legs in one day. Living in base "is the bee's knees... the wasp's nipples. [It] is, I would go so far as to say, the entire set of erogenous zones of every major flying insect of the Western world" as one would say.

No commute is easy. They can be managed, tolerated, and indeed preferred if you have zero desire to live in the base city, but it won't be made any easier when you first start and are at the bottom of the standby list, cannot jumpseat, and are constantly under threat of being written up at an airline that actively discourages FAs from commuting during their first year. If you live in MSP, want to live in MSP, and don't wanna hate your life, don't commute.
This is all really good advice. I definitely am putting MSP and ORD at the top of my list. I was just thinking that maybe the flying at ORD would be good enough to justify the commute. But you are right, that doesn't make sense. I will put MSP first, ORD second, then the other hubs, then the outstations.
 

Autothrust Blue

"Duuuuuude."
Fixed it for you. Now if only I would take my own advice.
Pretty sure I have the same commute you do, or a similar one, except I get the jumpseat 72 hours out, reserved, have a commuter clause and a chief pilot who has read that clause, and so on and so forth.

But, agreed mostly.
 

n156499000

Titanius Anglesmith
Do you mean the weather or something else? I already live in MSP, so the weather in the upper midwest is already a part of my lifestyle :/
Weather is part of it (11 years living in Phoenix and anything below 70 is getting to be indoor only weather for me), but mostly it was operational differences and quality of overnights/boredom with the night life in Rhinelander, et al.

I hear that, but I'm absolutely not willing to work 40 hours a week for an unknown period of time just to try for DL FA once each year. It is really weird to me that people say this, though. I can't imagine how doing the exact same job in a position where the public perceives you as a Delta employee doesn't make them think you would be a good fit for the job.
As a current DL employee you are a known quantity. As an employee for another company, you are a vaguely known quantity but only in generalities. You may be working DL coded flights, but legally DL can’t ask OO if you are any good at it or not, and other than passenger serveys has no way of knowing if you are performing to DL standards, which can get skewed by factors outside your control. DL wants, especially for FAs, people who know and act the DL culture. As an OO FA you may be working DLConnection flights, but your doing it under the OO service culture which, depending on the flavor of the week, may or may not be a desirable trait in favor of hiring you. I’ve known FAs who had 10+ years experience who couldn’t get hired off the street at DL and had to work a year or two as DL Customer Service Agents before getting the call. Not saying it’s not possible, but from what I’ve seen it’s harder to get hired off the street than as an internal transfer at DL for FA jobs.
 

Sculprit

Well-Known Member
Weather is part of it (11 years living in Phoenix and anything below 70 is getting to be indoor only weather for me), but mostly it was operational differences and quality of overnights/boredom with the night life in Rhinelander, et al.
Just walk through the alley one block over and profit at one of the cheap bars...
 
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