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SkyLens accepting resumes for 2018-2019 season

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#41
@pilotbry - it seems like the most difficult part of the gig for a qualified pilot is the family aspect, yes? I'm guessing very few of your pilots are married due to the distance factors?
A few are. I couldn't do it. I was single the entire time I flew for DWAS. When I met my wife, I came off the road and settled here. If a pilot has been married for a while and /or has a spouse that can pick up and travel to visit that pilot on location, it's doable. If you have a fresh girlfriend or boyfriend, or especially a fiancé, your odds of still having that relationship when the season ends is maybe 50/50. :-|
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
#42
A few are. I couldn't do it. I was single the entire time I flew for DWAS. When I met my wife, I came off the road and settled here. If a pilot has been married for a while and /or has a spouse that can pick up and travel to visit that pilot on location, it's doable. If you have a fresh girlfriend or boyfriend, or especially a fiancé, your odds of still having that relationship when the season ends is maybe 50/50. :-|
Appreciate the candor. Wouldn't necessarily be an issue for my wife and I, but it's good to know the situation.
 

citrus

Needs more right rudder
#43
My friend is married to a Delta pilot and they made it work this past season, she said the amount you fly kind of made it worth it in the end. She is on at a regional now with her 1500 hours and wont have to think about being split for that period of time again.

I personally was a little hesitant at first, but once you realize how fast 7 months flies by and know you wont have an opportunity like it again, might as well do it!
It's an experience, granted you're working but when/where else are you going to have a chance to fly across the country in a single/twin light airplane - sure beats my desk job any day!
 

Subieguy14

Well-Known Member
#44
Hey Bryan, Just curious on how long it would take to get the Operations guide? I know on here it says after we send the Excel sheet back, but in the email it said a few weeks. I know you're probably swamped with applications. But is there usually a few weeks you take to get everyone ordered and then send out the operations guide, or is it almost instant if you are interested in the Excel when you get it back?

Also, if you aren't interested in us, is there a TBNT sent or just nothing?
 

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#45
Hey Bryan, Just curious on how long it would take to get the Operations guide? I know on here it says after we send the Excel sheet back, but in the email it said a few weeks. I know you're probably swamped with applications. But is there usually a few weeks you take to get everyone ordered and then send out the operations guide, or is it almost instant if you are interested in the Excel when you get it back?

Also, if you aren't interested in us, is there a TBNT sent or just nothing?
Good question. It's easily a few weeks. Every returned app gets a review and with hundreds of them, that is no small job even with my Flight Ops Assistant helping. Not every returned app moves on to the next step which is another email expressing our interest in the candidate for the position. That email will include a copy of the pilot guide so that the candidate can make an informed and certain decision whether he/she is wiling and able to accept and fulfill such a contract. If the candidate replies in the affirmative, that app is placed into the interview stack and I begin calling. Everyone in that group will get either a call for interview or an email indicating that we are not offering a position at that point but that your application will be placed into a 1st tier hiring pool. Every year there are one or two who accept and then get cold feet(usually after a significant other gets cold feet). Also some pilots do not make it though training and orientation. That's when I go back to the hiring pool. So the initial roster may not be complete until end of August but there are possibilities of hiring out of the pool all the way into October. Those late hirings would require immediate availability. I send out a TBNT email to the remaining applicants and that process is also time consuming so it could be well into September before those go out. We do not reply to resumes received that were sent without following the stated directions or that did not meet the stated minimums. I know that's a long complicated explanation but so is the process. My intention is to get the best of the best out there while giving everyone a fair shake because I know that most of the pilots I don't(can't) hire are just as worthy as the ones I do.
 

Subieguy14

Well-Known Member
#46
Good question. It's easily a few weeks. Every returned app gets a review and with hundreds of them, that is no small job even with my Flight Ops Assistant helping. Not every returned app moves on to the next step which is another email expressing our interest in the candidate for the position. That email will include a copy of the pilot guide so that the candidate can make an informed and certain decision whether he/she is wiling and able to accept and fulfill such a contract. If the candidate replies in the affirmative, that app is placed into the interview stack and I begin calling. Everyone in that group will get either a call for interview or an email indicating that we are not offering a position at that point but that your application will be placed into a 1st tier hiring pool. Every year there are one or two who accept and then get cold feet(usually after a significant other gets cold feet). Also some pilots do not make it though training and orientation. That's when I go back to the hiring pool. So the initial roster may not be complete until end of August but there are possibilities of hiring out of the pool all the way into October. Those late hirings would require immediate availability. I send out a TBNT email to the remaining applicants and that process is also time consuming so it could be well into September before those go out. We do not reply to resumes received that were sent without following the stated directions or that did not meet the stated minimums. I know that's a long complicated explanation but so is the process. My intention is to get the best of the best out there while giving everyone a fair shake because I know that most of the pilots I don't(can't) hire are just as worthy as the ones I do.
Just the answer I was looking for, thanks for being so in touch with everyone!
 

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#48
@pilotbry - Appreciate the follow up Bryan.
Any chance you can elaborate on what training entails?
Also, what are some of the things that cause applicants to washout as well.
Major components of training:
Classroom-
1. Company policy, procedures and expectations
2. Safety and Aeronautical Decision-making
3. Aircraft knowledge, handling and maintenance(stuff no school ever taught you)
4. Pictometry EagleView Camera system

Practical-
1. Aircraft skills assessment (preflight, taxi, takeoff, instrument approach, landings)
2. In air training on the Picto/EagleView system

Main causes of washout:
Showing up overconfident and with a casual attitude toward the job / Not paying attention in the classroom.
Not knowing the C172. We have M and P models but all of our 172s have the 160hp D2J engine of a P model. Know the specs of a P model.
Inability to pull off a decent landing in a 172 (I'm not even kidding. Unbelievably, it happens every year)
Inability to develop the skills to fly the photogrammetric lines. Most pilots pick it up after a few days of training. On rare occasion, some pilots just can't get it.

We will bend over backward to help you succeed in training if you are making an honest effort. Once you are here it's a pain in my donkey if someone doesn't make it and I have to scramble to replace a seat.
 

tbflyer

Well-Known Member
#49
Flying in a straight line and turning around can be hard for some. Basic stick and rudder skills along with some confidence in your ability to fly will be needed to do this job. I know we had one person I tried to train that simply couldn’t fly an airplane, got lost taxiing, was afraid to fly in very mild winds, couldn’t talk on the radio, had no ability to plan simple tasks or multi task. If you are like this you should save your time(and the companies) and not apply to be a survey pilot. This job requires good flying skills and some basic multi tasking and managerial skills. If you are lacking especially in flying get some practice before taking your first job. I found that the pilots who love a challenge did really good with this job. What I mean is those who are always working on technique and like flying in crosswinds and challenging themselves excel at this job. Stick and rudder is very important in this job, you can improve it by trying to challenge yourself in any way while flying. Try precision approaches(landing on an exact spot.) do them from different configurations if you are always challenging yourself your will love this job.
 

Subieguy14

Well-Known Member
#50
Flying in a straight line and turning around can be hard for some. Basic stick and rudder skills along with some confidence in your ability to fly will be needed to do this job. I know we had one person I tried to train that simply couldn’t fly an airplane, got lost taxiing, was afraid to fly in very mild winds, couldn’t talk on the radio, had no ability to plan simple tasks or multi task. If you are like this you should save your time(and the companies) and not apply to be a survey pilot. This job requires good flying skills and some basic multi tasking and managerial skills. If you are lacking especially in flying get some practice before taking your first job. I found that the pilots who love a challenge did really good with this job. What I mean is those who are always working on technique and like flying in crosswinds and challenging themselves excel at this job. Stick and rudder is very important in this job, you can improve it by trying to challenge yourself in any way while flying. Try precision approaches(landing on an exact spot.) do them from different configurations if you are always challenging yourself your will love this job.
Let me tell ya. I was not terrific at turns around a point or ground reference maneuvers in general(even my stick and rrudder was really iffy when i did my comm single checkride), they didn't make sense to me.. Why circle a water tower or field? When would I ever do that?.... Towed banners for 300 hours and suddenly It all made sense. You want to stay certain distance from events etc etc and have to compensate for the wind which could be 25 kts at 1000 feet, when you're only at 40 kt airspeed, doesnt do much when you are circling and need to learn to really compensate and crab etc etc. My CFI and DPEs would be proud of my ground ref maneuvers and stick and rudder skills now:bounce:
 
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tbflyer

Well-Known Member
#51
Let me tell ya. I was not terrific at turns around a point or ground reference maneuvers in general(even my stick and rrudder was really iffy when i did my comm single checkride), they didn't make sense to me.. Wy circle a water tower or field?.... Towed banners for 300 hours and suddenly It all made sense. You want to stay certain distance from events etc etc and have to compensate for the wind which could be 25 kts at 1000 feet, when you're only at 40 kt airspeed, doesnt do much when you are circling and need to learn to really compensate and crab etc etc. My CFI and DPEs would be proud of my ground ref maneuvers and stick and rudder skills now:bounce:
It’s the same thing in survey, you have to turn around and align with the next line. If you suck at turning or have bad judgment you will overshoot or undershoot and have to re-do the line. Having to re-do a line every once in a while is no biggie, but when it gets windy if your stick and rudder skills stuck you will end up messing up a lot of lines, most likely all going the same direction which will cause the plan to take 2x as long. I always liked to challenge myself on Turing by doing them in the least space possible without breaking the max turn rate. (Requires a climb/turn/decent)
 

Subieguy14

Well-Known Member
#52
It’s the same thing in survey, you have to turn around and align with the next line. If you suck at turning or have bad judgment you will overshoot or undershoot and have to re-do the line. Having to re-do a line every once in a while is no biggie, but when it gets windy if your stick and rudder skills stuck you will end up messing up a lot of lines, most likely all going the same direction which will cause the plan to take 2x as long. I always liked to challenge myself on Turing by doing them in the least space possible without breaking the max turn rate. (Requires a climb/turn/decent)
Just like the crop dusters. I love that kind of flying... Really makes the flying enjoyable before you head off to corporate or the airlines.

I decided not to go the CFI route and told myself I wanted to enjoy my 1500 the best I could. I will never regret that.
 

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#53
Hey all: I'd like to respectfully ask that you not submit resumes until you have attained all the minimum requirements listed in our job posting. I do not offer employment based on an applicant's expectation that they'll have the required certificates and/or hours by October. Also please note that the 250tt hour minimum is time in an aircraft while you are the sole manipulator of the controls or can legally log the the time as PIC. You will gain nothing by submitting a resume short of our minimums other than frustrating the personnel processing the paperwork, including myself. I've had some resumes come in that only had a private certificate and/or 30-40 hours short.You'll have a much better chance if you get your ducks in a row and apply mid-season. I'll have more seats open in January. Thanks for understanding.

We are still processing incoming resumes and applications. We've gotten about 70 resumes and maybe 60 applications have been returned for review. It is unlikely that there will be many interview calls made this week but you will get an email with a heads up and a copy of the ops guide if you make it onto the interview list.
 

Subieguy14

Well-Known Member
#54
Hey all: I'd like to respectfully ask that you not submit resumes until you have attained all the minimum requirements listed in our job posting. I do not offer employment based on an applicant's expectation that they'll have the required certificates and/or hours by October. Also please note that the 250tt hour minimum is time in an aircraft while you are the sole manipulator of the controls or can legally log the the time as PIC. You will gain nothing by submitting a resume short of our minimums other than frustrating the personnel processing the paperwork, including myself. I've had some resumes come in that only had a private certificate and/or 30-40 hours short.You'll have a much better chance if you get your ducks in a row and apply mid-season. I'll have more seats open in January. Thanks for understanding.

We are still processing incoming resumes and applications. We've gotten about 70 resumes and maybe 60 applications have been returned for review. It is unlikely that there will be many interview calls made this week but you will get an email with a heads up and a copy of the ops guide if you make it onto the interview list.
Thanks for the update!
 

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#55
Hey all: I'd like to respectfully ask that you not submit resumes until you have attained all the minimum requirements listed in our job posting. I do not offer employment based on an applicant's expectation that they'll have the required certificates and/or hours by October. Also please note that the 250tt hour minimum is time in an aircraft while you are the sole manipulator of the controls or can legally log the the time as PIC. You will gain nothing by submitting a resume short of our minimums other than frustrating the personnel processing the paperwork, including myself. I've had some resumes come in that only had a private certificate and/or 30-40 hours short.You'll have a much better chance if you get your ducks in a row and apply mid-season. I'll have more seats open in January. Thanks for understanding.

We are still processing incoming resumes and applications. We've gotten about 70 resumes and maybe 60 applications have been returned for review. It is unlikely that there will be many interview calls made this week but you will get an email with a heads up and a copy of the ops guide if you make it onto the interview list.
HEY WAIT... One exception to this - If you are not yet 21 years old but will turn 21 on or Before October 1st, you may apply, assuming all other criteria are met. Your age is set in stone. No one needs to sign that off in a logbook.
 

CakeOnIt

Well-Known Member
#56
This is GOOD news for me. I'm working on completing my IPC, and as I am completing that I'm making a sincere effort to not just get the IPC but to actually get proficient in actual IFR (not impossible, as I'm in the northeast right now). I encountered IFR more than a handful of times while relocating as a picto pilot. Furthermore, I spent a considerable amount of time wile working picto in various Bravo airspace, so I'm doing as much work as possible with my CFI reviewing things that I felt were mandatory doing single picto work.

A quick question for Brian. I do not have access to a twin right now, but have 150 hours multi. Would you recommend finding an MEI who can do a few hours multi, or just hold off? The rental+instructor cost is daunting. I do have 12 hours in a PA44, but that has been some time ago. The rest of the multi time was in a BE76. Finally, is there anything else you would recommend focusing on with my CFI in preparation for this or other return to commercial flying opportunities? Thank you Brian!
 

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#57
This is GOOD news for me. I'm working on completing my IPC, and as I am completing that I'm making a sincere effort to not just get the IPC but to actually get proficient in actual IFR (not impossible, as I'm in the northeast right now). I encountered IFR more than a handful of times while relocating as a picto pilot. Furthermore, I spent a considerable amount of time wile working picto in various Bravo airspace, so I'm doing as much work as possible with my CFI reviewing things that I felt were mandatory doing single picto work.

A quick question for Brian. I do not have access to a twin right now, but have 150 hours multi. Would you recommend finding an MEI who can do a few hours multi, or just hold off? The rental+instructor cost is daunting. I do have 12 hours in a PA44, but that has been some time ago. The rest of the multi time was in a BE76. Finally, is there anything else you would recommend focusing on with my CFI in preparation for this or other return to commercial flying opportunities? Thank you Brian!
Any experience is good experience but if were talking about positioning yourself to be successful at my company your best bet is to continue to try to be an ace in a 172. As funny as that may sound, I've had pilots show up at training with all kinds of twin time who bounce the 172 down the runway on multiple tries and end up going home. Assuming that at least 50 hours of your multi is at the controls, you'll be trained in the Aztec as a backup. While not usually the case, it is possible to be placed in the Aztec out of the gate if I'm short on twin pilots at season start. With 150 multi and previous picto experience I'm pretty sure we'll be talking on the phone soon.
 

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#58
Update: So I received 79 resumes the first week. After initial reviews I was surprised to have to disqualify 29 of those. Reasons - mostly not nearly the required hour mins. These pilot schools that you young pilots are going into serious debt for are not doing you any favors graduating you with 215 hours. If ATP and Riddle et al would invest in one Piper Aztec and get everyone 10 hours in it, those graduates would practically have a guaranteed job waiting. Hint, in the near future, the Picto/EV fleet across all vendors will likely have 100 Aztec jobs to fill per season. Some of these sneaked by in the initial review because the applicant had listed sim time in with total time. Yes, sim time counts toward some ratings etc but our instructions state "in aircraft, not sim".

Next - age - I can not hire a 19 or 20 year old. You need to be able to rent a car and be covered by our insurance and that requires 21(by Oct 1st). The good news is that time will solve that problem and I'll have another class in January.

Other issues -
I love my military men & women but this biz model simply does not work around active guard obligations. You must be free of ANY obligations from Oct 1 through May 31.

I had a LOT of submissions come in that demonstrated absolute minimum effort. Some were simply a resume(usually with bare minimum quals) attached to a blank email or maybe one line that says "Here's my resume". If that's a measure of the effort that you put into your job then you're wasting your time and mine. Plus, the submission directions state the need for a cover letter.

I've already contacted about a dozen candidates advising that I'll be calling for interview. I may get a few in today but mostly next week. We're still processing.

I'll probably stop officially accepting resumes for the October classes on the 15th of August so get 'em in now if you want a chance at this regular season.

Also - If you followed directions and made sure of the email address and the server didn't bounce it back at you then we got it. The process takes a while. I know the waiting is excruciating and I'm sorry.
 

Subieguy14

Well-Known Member
#60
You are probably the most up to date, getting back to, responsive people that I have ever seen working at a company. It really says A LOT.

Thanks for all the work you put into this that you aren't forced to do. Even the Ops guide was one of the most in depth things I have read for any job I have had so far.
 
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