• Guest! Follow new job postings on Twitter and Facebook

SkyLens accepting resumes for 2018-2019 season

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#1
SkyLens Aerial Imaging is now accepting resumes for the 2018-2019 season.


Minimum Requirements:
21 years of age or over
250 hrs total time. 10 hrs C172.
Legal to work in US (any immigration or work permit processes must be complete)
FAA issued Single Engine Land Commercial pilot certificate
IFR rated and competent
Class 2 or 1 Medical Certificate
Able to read, write and speak clear English
Cell phone with texting capability
Portable computer or device capable of running Microsoft Excel
(There are no exceptions to these requirements)


Job basics:
7 month contract - No hard time off but plenty of short days and down days for wx and mx. You must be free of any known obligations and be able to remain on the road for the entire length of contract.

Cessna 172 pilot pay: $90 each calendar day for first 90 days then $95. Escalating monthly production bonus based on hours flown each month
Piper Aztec pilot pay: $95/day first 90 days then $100. DOUBLE escalating monthly production bonus based on hours flown each month
Top C172 monthly pilot bonus this past season was $1,591. Top Aztec pilot bonus this past season was $2,700. The more you fly, the more you make.

Company paid single occupancy hotel rooms and rental cars
Health Insurance Reimbursement Program (HIRP): Company reimburses you for a portion of your qualifying health insurance premiums.
$1000 Season completion bonus
Paid as W2 Employee - not 1099 contractor
Possibilities exist for extending season out to 9,10,11 months per year
Pay raises for pilots returning for the following season


The process:
I do not take phone calls for job inquiries.
Here's the link to our employment page: Pilot Employment
Follow the directions EXACTLY to submit your resume and cover letter or yours could be lost in the black hole of my many email boxes. Qualified candidates will receive an email back from me with a pilot info sheet/ application in MS Excel format, to fill out and return. After the application is reviewed, applicants are separated into hiring tiers based on qualifications and our specific criteria. If I am interested, I will email a copy of our Pilot Operations Guide for your review, and ask you to reply if you are truly interested and able to take such a position. At that point you may receive a phone call for an interview. At the end of that phone call you may be offered the job. We do not fly you to HQ for a final interview or have an “interview contract” Our hiring is done over the phone. We will airline you into New Orleans or Baton Rouge and bring you to Hammond in October for training, at which point the job will be yours to lose. Housing and transportation is company provided during training. Training pay is $35 per day. Your flying and IFR skills will be evaluated during training. Aztec pilots will be qualified in one of our aircraft with our MEI/DPE. We are planning two classes again this season starting Oct 1st and Oct 15th.


Some suggestions:
While the lack of a multi certificate and/or little to no multi time is not a disqualifying factor, having your multi and 40+ hours multi time will likely put a candidate into the top hiring tier. Our Aztec fleet will be expanding so we will be getting the 172 pilots qualified as Aztec backup pilots and migrating them into the twins as necessary.

Other qualities that will improve your chances - A&P Certification, previous Pictometry rig flying experience, MEI, Aztec time, previous commercial pilot job of any kind, mountain flying experience.

If your flying skills are rusty, invest in some time with a CFI and get in some landings and Instrument approaches. Review the C172 POH and KNOW THAT AIRCRAFT. If your skills and aeronautical knowledge are not up to par on arrival at training, you will likely be sent home.

Understand that you will likely not see home for 7 months. There is no going home for the holidays, friends' weddings or other personal or professional obligations. Please make sure you have discussed this in depth with family/significant others, before applying.

By the time we are calling you for a phone interview, we are 90% interested. You should have done your homework on this company and be ready to accept.

If you get a call from a 985 area code, you should answer it. We will not leave a message.

We take our contracts very seriously and you should too.

You do not need to be IFR current to be hired but you do need to be rated, comfortable and competent flying instruments. We can get you current during training.

I give special consideration to former military men and women however you must be free of ANY obligation for duty for the span of the entire 7 month contract.

Interview calls may go through the end of August and hiring is generally complete by early September.

Please ask your questions here in this thread and not with a PM to me. I'm sometimes days between logging on to JC and some of my current and former pilots can likely answer your questions before I do. In fact, I invite any of my former pilots to pipe up here and relay the SkyLens experience to the prospective new pilots or let me know if I left anything out.

Good luck, all!

Bryan Porter
Flight Ops Mgr
SkyLens LLC
 

Miranoff

Well-Known Member
#2
If you get a call from a 985 area code, you should answer it. We will not leave a message
Jesus Bryan, must be getting loads of apps to not be leaving messages. Who says there's a pilot shortage eh?

Flew for a different outfit last season but always heard good things about Skylens. Good way to build hours without the headaches that come with students.
 

Whatusername

Drive hard and NEVER lift.
#3
Just wondering how much time can you build in a season? Will they take someone with 900+ hours? I really might do it as I tick all of the boxes.
 

tbflyer

Well-Known Member
#4
Just wondering how much time can you build in a season? Will they take someone with 900+ hours? I really might do it as I tick all of the boxes.
I worked for a different vendor last year and I got just under 500 hours. Some of my coworkers got over 700. I had really bad luck with my plane breaking on a Friday or Saturday night when we couldn’t get parts till Monday or Tuesday. Skylens will keep you busy as it seemed like every time we would leave an area after waiting for leaves to fall or weather to clear to finish our small project they would come in behind us with a huge project. When weather was forecasted to be good.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
#6
How does it work if the airplane breaks down/ceases to be airworthy while on the road. Does the PIC coordinate with Skylens and a local mech to resolve the problem? What does that look like?
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
#7
Other question - is the $90 per day on days you're flying, regardless of the number of hours flying? On days where you're grounded by weather, how are pilots paid?
 

EAD

Well-Known Member
#8
Other question - is the $90 per day on days you're flying, regardless of the number of hours flying? On days where you're grounded by weather, how are pilots paid?
I used to work for SkyLens so let me share some info from my time there. The $90 per day was regardless of hours flown, so it's a guaranteed salary. It definitely takes the sting out of bad weather days. The performance bonus is on top of your regular pay based on the total number of hours flown that month.

If something breaks on your plane that makes it unairworthy, your highest priority is getting it up and running again. You will work with local Mx shops and consult with HQ to get your stuff fixed. SkyLens mx helps you as needed but you are the primary point of contact for the local shop. The company policies manual as well as orientation gives a pretty good idea of what your responsibilities are.

When things broke, they usually broke in the "typical" ways that mechanics are familiar with or the Director of Mx at SkyLens was
familiar with.

You will almost always have an idea of where to go for MX by the time you get to a project because it's a requirement for choosing the project "base". Most mechanics understood that we were a business and treated us accordingly. Occasionally, the shop we had planned for wasn't able to help and we would have to find someone else to do the work that time.

It sounds more complicated and difficult than it really is and HQ was always available to help when needed.
 
Last edited:

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#9
Jesus Bryan, must be getting loads of apps to not be leaving messages. Who says there's a pilot shortage eh?

Flew for a different outfit last season but always heard good things about Skylens. Good way to build hours without the headaches that come with students.
Your tongue in cheek assumption is correct. There is no "low-time" pilot shortage. I have received 32 resumes since posting this yesterday and have already gotten 22 application/pilot info sheets back. FYI - the number I'll call from is my personal cell with a 985 area code. If a pilot misses the call he/she should just call it back ASAP.
 

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#10
Just wondering how much time can you build in a season? Will they take someone with 900+ hours? I really might do it as I tick all of the boxes.
700 in a 7 month season would be average for my crews. I just had a pilot fly 219 hours in June. An Aztec pilot did 192 hours in the month of April. 900 hours does not disqualify you but you would easily hit 1500 before the end of the season and pilots are 100% expected to fulfill their contracts.
 

pilotbry

Well-Known Member
#11
Roughly what are you taking home per month? I’m looking into 500tt jobs, but can’t work for $10 hr.
Gross pay guarantee starts at $2700-2850 per month. Most of my pilots were doing $600-700 a month in bonus and some type A pilots regularly hitting a $1000+. Take home pay is dependent on how you set up your W4 and how much of a type A you are. SkyLens pilots are employees so you're paying half the social security taxes as you would as a 1099 "contractor" and hotel/car/gas expenses are company paid.
 

fletchersteel

Well-Known Member
#12
Gross pay guarantee starts at $2700-2850 per month. Most of my pilots were doing $600-700 a month in bonus and some type A pilots regularly hitting a $1000+. Take home pay is dependent on how you set up your W4 and how much of a type A you are. SkyLens pilots are employees so you're paying half the social security taxes as you would as a 1099 "contractor" and hotel/car/gas expenses are company paid.
Sounds good! I’ll have to get my resume in to you.
 

Whatusername

Drive hard and NEVER lift.
#13
700 in a 7 month season would be average for my crews. I just had a pilot fly 219 hours in June. An Aztec pilot did 192 hours in the month of April. 900 hours does not disqualify you but you would easily hit 1500 before the end of the season and pilots are 100% expected to fulfill their contracts.
No worries about bailing when I hit the magic number. But I will need to sit down and start dressing up my resume as I’m going to go for it.
 

Subieguy14

Well-Known Member
#16
Resume submitted. I've got a loooooooooooong shot but this opportunity is too good to pass up IMO.
Same. Some current and former pilots there told me I had a pretty good chance with 500TT, but being up against 900+ hours really makes me worry lol

Goodluck!
 
Last edited:

CakeOnIt

Well-Known Member
#17
I am just in the process of getting current again after a multi year break from aviation, and strongly considering this position. I have over 100 hours multi, 1 season of prior picto experience (1 season Landcare), and am prior military. I do have high hours (little over 1000TT) but am fully aware of the picto season demands. My time away from aviation was due to starting a business in a rural part of the Northeast, and I have now sold out of that endeavor and really just want to get back into aviation; my time flying for Landcare doing picto was really a great experience, and frankly one of my favorite experiences. My dilemma is getting an IPC and BFR quickly enough to apply in time for consideration for this position. As stated above, I live in the rural northeast and all the local FBOs have withered away, and my only local CFI with and aircraft sadly passed away and the aircraft sold. So my question is, would it be best to just bite the bullet and travel to a "pilot mill" like ATP or some such and pay through the nose for a relatively fast IPC and BFR, or use my most local option - a 90 minute drive to the nearest FBO with a light single and CFI and get current that way. My fear is that the 90 minute drive to the nearest FBO would have less intense focus on the task at hand, as the CFIs there have "day jobs" outside aviation. With a more rigorous flight school, they would have multiple instrument proficient CFIIs and even a twin that I would like to get a few hours in. Well that's my situation in a nutshell, let me know what you think. If I can get PROFICIENT, I will be in the mix. Thanks everyone!
 
Last edited:

abite

Active Member
#18
sitting at 250 hours with around 100ME PIC... hoping for the best.

So my question is, would it be best to just bite the bullet and travel to a "pilot mill" like ATP or some such and pay through the nose for a relatively fast IPC and BFR
I don't think ATP does the PIC and BFR stuff anymore, or at least not all locations do.
 

Alexib71

Well-Known Member
#19
Same. Some current and former pilots there told me I had a pretty good chance with 500TT, but being up against 900+ hours really makes me worry lol

Goodluck!
Bryan actually like guys with under 900hrs. Please don't be discourage you have a great opportunity on getting the job.
 

CakeOnIt

Well-Known Member
#20
Bryan actually like guys with under 900hrs. Please don't be discourage you have a great opportunity on getting the job.
Is his preference just because of the potential of pilots "jumping ship" at 1500TT? I am curious because I am in that 1000TT group; where I am located now, there is little are few to no job opportunities even including sky-dive jobs, and with no CFI and very few FBO's, I've pretty much ruled out the CFI route. I would likely include in my cover letter that I have absolutely no intention of leaving before the end of season.
 
Top