Skydiving Instructor with a DUI

periksmoen

Well-Known Member
So I have had a couple of questions posed upon me that I don't exactly know the answer to. A friend of mine is a skydiving tandem instructor. The United States Parachute Association (not the FAA) requires all tandem instructors to have a current FAA 3rd class medical in order to conduct tandem jumps. About a year ago, my friend received a DUI and at the time he held a current 3rd class medical. Since he is not a pilot and holds no airmen certificates, was he required to report it to the FAA?

Fast forward to last week when he misplaced his medical certificate. Rather than just request a replacement, he went to an AME to get a new one even though the one he misplaced was valid until 2014. He checked the box about receiving a DUI and so the doctor has requested additional paperwork and said that he may have to send it to OKC for review. The next day, he found his misplaced certificate. So, the second question is whether or not his unexpired medical is still valid while his new medical application is being reviewed/deferred? He has been upfront with his employer about the whole thing, but they are now unsure whether or not his current medical is still valid and thus whether or not he can continue working while this is sorted out.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
The USPA is non-regulatory. That is, they make and enforce no laws. So the USPA doesn't require anything. It's more like, they ask nicely.
 

Inverted25

Well-Known Member
His current medical is not valid. Once you start the process for a new one your current one is void. If he deferred to OKC then your buddy doesn't have a valid medical anymore
 

My Flight Surgeon

Sr. Aviation Medical Examiner
Correct, once the new application was submitted to OKC, the old medical is no longer valid. He is going to have to wait for the FAA to respond.
 

UAL747400

Well-Known Member
See z987k's post. If true, screw it. Keep the old medical and don't get another one. I imagine the employer may have their own policies, but I have a friend who's a skydiving instructor and has never had a medical certificate nor do any of his coworkers. Your friend should also ask people in the know in skydiving. As previously stated, the medical is no longer valid, but in the skydiving world, it might not matter.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
The only rules that actually apply to skydiving are in FAR 105. It's like 2 pages long.
 

Propilot

Well-Known Member
The USPA is non-regulatory. That is, they make and enforce no laws. So the USPA doesn't require anything. It's more like, they ask nicely.
Well, semantics, but they are regulatory, at least for those dropzones who wish to keep their USPA Member DZ status.
 

Propilot

Well-Known Member
What is a law? Yea, it's not a government law. But it's a rule that if you don't follow there will be consequences. That's all a law is. Like i said. Semantics. The effect, Is that you need to follow USPA rules.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
What is a law? Yea, it's not a government law. But it's a rule that if you don't follow there will be consequences. That's all a law is. Like i said. Semantics. The effect, Is that you need to follow USPA rules.
I've jumped and flown at DZ's that are not USPA.
 

Propilot

Well-Known Member
RIght. Which is why I said, "for those dropzones that wish to keep their USPA member status".
 

jergar999

Yoke Pumper!
Unless the TSO under which the tandem setup spells out the medical certificate requirement in which case it does fall under FAA jurisdiction.
 
Top