Simultaneous JAA/FAA qualifications

von_Richthofen

New Member
Hello,

I am a 0 time aspiring aviator and am looking into making the airlines a career. I am fortunate enough to have been born with both US and EU citizenship so I have the right to work and live in either. Since I'd like the flexibility of being able to fly professionally in either the US or EU at some point, I'm debating whether I should go the FAA or JAA liscensing route. Ultimately I'd like to get both FAA and JAA qualifications. Are there any programs that will let you do both simultaneously? Or should I go for the JAA first and then convert to FAA since that seems to be easier than vice-versa?
 

Athena

New Member
I am looking to do the same thing in the long run. From my understanding the requirements of the FAA translate right over to the JAA. I may be wrong but that is what I have seen so far. If you find anything out please let me know.
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
Hi,

There are several flight schools in the US where you can accomplish both FAA and JAA qualifications simultaneously. I am resonably confident in saying that you cannot complete the JAA training 100% in the U.S. I believe that you probably have to go back to Europe to do the ground examinations and the Instrument Rating and Commercial Pilot's Licence skill tests.

JAA training in Europe is MUCH MUCH MUCH more expensive than the US. Acquiring FAA certificates is not as involved as getting JAA licenses, at least when it comes to anything more than a PPL. The question remains whether you would want to fork out the money to do JAA training and then come over to the US and do the FAA stuff. I would suggest doing all of your training over here at a school that does both at the same time.

Ray

P.S. As a side note, except for the Private Pilot level, VERY little transfers between FAA and JAA. The FAA accepts instruction from ICAO instructors, but all of the written tests and flight tests have to be done. As far as JAA goes, it's even worse. You have to do all the ground exams, then do some flight training (how much depends on what the UK CAA or its equivalent "assesses" you need to do), then do the flight tests. I've never been through an assessment because I already hold UK qualifications, so I can't tell you how much training they would require. At the professional pilot level, you're not going to find that countries are all that willing to just to hand over their version of license or certificate. It's all about job protection for the local pilots.

Long side note!!
 
Top