Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advice.

nanyangview

New Member
Hi people and captains..this is my first post here. Nice to meet ya all!\\Being a pilot has been a dream of mine since the age of 7 i think. That was the first time i hopped on a 747 enroute to europe. Ever since, each time i fly on a commercial plane, i would ask permission to visit the captain in the cockpit. From then, I was fascinated with aviation.

Now, i am 18 and first year in university studying business admin, life is not great for a freshman. Lots of stress and I am not doing particularly well in my first semester. Economics and accounting are murdering me. Maybe I will switch major, who knows. I know for sure that I am too outgoing for regular office work, so that is the reason I linger towards aviation.

I am thinking that after I graduate, I should and a job to finance flight school in order to pursue my dream of being a commercial pilot.

What does it take to be a commercial plane as a captain or first officer? I know that one has to go through numerous hours of flight school etc...must you be the best of the best to be a commercial pilot ? (like going to medical school, you must be the top etc.)

My math skills and physic skills are not very bright, so i am worried that will shatter my dreams of being a pilot..what are the qualities that one need? how long did it take you people (first officers/captains) to realize your dream? I also understand that on the way to the cockpit, one has to put up with low-pay and near-poverty type of living to finance the training. I don’t mind that at all. After all, there can be no triumph without sacrifice.

I am a Chinese wearing glasses, so will racial issue be another hindrance to my dream? There is only one major airline in Canada (Air Canada), so what are the prospect of employment then? Can a Canadian certified pilot move to the states and seek employment there? Any Canadians want to share your view on this?

THANKS TAYLOR for SETTING UP THIS GREAT BOARD.
 

cointyro

New Member
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Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me?

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It's impossible, sorry. Give up now so you can't be disappointed later.

Just kidding, of course. Welcome! This is an AWESOME board for aviation enthusiasts, especially because of the class-act individuals who visit and input frequently (you know who you are
).

At age 18, I'd say first work on a good solid college degree, and if you can scrounge up the money, get your private pilot's license at the same time. This will give you the first few hours and experience you'll absolutely need to decide whether flying for a living is worth pursuing - given the enormous costs ($30k+ for training, plus annual wages around $15k for 3 to 5 years or more).

I'm sure others will chip in
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
Hey nanyangview

First off, school sucks
but I wouldn't sweat it too much unless you're failing

Anyways have you considered getting a job now and saving? Maybe take a few intro flights too. A lot of us here are college guys / girls;

At the least I would take a few intro flights now just to make sure it's 'for you' (sounds like it is).

Good luck!
 

cointyro

New Member
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I am too outgoing for regular office work,

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Sure, that's what they all say. Until they see the wage and standard-of-living differentials between a social job like waitressing or bus driving, and "regular office work" like accounting or marketing or finance or sales or engineering... all of which can involve much more socializing than you may initially expect.
 

Parabellum

New Member
The best advice I can give is to just do things one step at a time. Take a few flight lessons at your local airport, and if you like what you see, then continue flying until you get a private pilot certificate. If you're still enthused after that, then shoot for advanced ratings until you eventually get your commercial. Do research, and talk to others who have professional flying experience and learn from them whatever you can. Then at least if you decide airline flying doesn't float your boat or simply doesn't work out for some reason, at least you can still call yourself a pilot. That in and of itself is a title that only a negligable number of people on this planet have earned.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

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That in and of itself is a title that only a negligable number of people on this planet have earned.

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That's kind of a cool statement...

I wonder what percentage of american people have a private pilots license?? Anyone know the stats?
 

Parabellum

New Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

I believe the total number of certified pilots in the U.S. is around 750,000. The number of those pilots who actively fly regularly is probably smaller.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

Do you know what the U.S. population is?
 

Parabellum

New Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

Approximately 273 million, according to the 2000 census. With nearly three years past, its likely even higher than that now.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

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Approximately 273 million, according to the 2000 census. With nearly three years past, its likely even higher than that now.

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So basically it's far less than one percent of the population... I think. Any math whizzes out there?
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

Where did you get all that info Paul?

Do they teach you guys that stuff at CSU?
 

Parabellum

New Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

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Where did you get all that info Paul?

Do they teach you guys that stuff at CSU?

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In a way I guess they do, in a course called Statistics for Business Students (yawn). But the number of pilots data can be found on the AOPA web site, and the census data I believe I got from a government class, if I recall correctly.
 

chrisdahut1

Well-Known Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

The Answer is.....0.0027%

Makes us all feel special doesn't it? :)
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

[ QUOTE ]
The Answer is.....0.0027%

Makes us all feel special doesn't it? :)

[/ QUOTE ]

Thanks!
 

RiddlePilot

New Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

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My math skills and physic skills are not very bright, so i am worried that will shatter my dreams of being a pilot..

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Math? Physics? I'm sorry, but I've never busted out a TI-89 calculator to do a few logarithms in flight.


Actually, I ended up getting Cs in my math and physics courses here at ERAU, and I'd like to say I'm doing well as a pilot so far. In other words, don't worry about it.
 

Parabellum

New Member
Re: Should i pursue my dream to be a pilot or it is impossibe for me? Please help and advi

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The Answer is.....0.0027%

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You forgot to multiply that by 100.
So the answer is actually 0.27%
 

davetheflyer

New Member
To become a professional pilot typically takes the following:
1. College degree (it doesn't matter what major)
2. Commercial pilot license
3. Minimum flight times of approximately 1000 hours total and 200 hours multi-engine
4. Being in the right place at the right time

It took me about twelve years from my first lesson to become an airline FO. I instructed for about nine years of that before deciding to make the jump to the airlines, so twelve years isn't typical.

At my company, there are many pilots who were born in other countries (including Canada). 9-11 rule changes have made it more difficult for foreign born pilots to train in the US, but I think that it will get easier and will just be a matter of paperwork by the time you are ready to send out resumes.

I would not worry about racial problems at all.
 
Race shouldn't be an issue at all. Tho you would need to read, wite and speak english very well. But from your "thread" that shouldn't be a problem at all. And you can wear glasses as long as you vision is correctable to 20/20.

Would have to agree I do well at school if I focus but I can be lazy and slack off as I really don't like school it is simply a means to an end for me.

As for math I'm not exactly stellar at it but I do well again if I focus. The highest math that I have taken was Trigonmetry and Vector Calculus. To date I have not used anything other then basic math.

When I lived in TUS at RYN field they used to train Lufthansa and Air China pilots. From what I understand either their govt. or the airlines paid for all of their training.

So training to be a pilot differs from country to country. But I think that to be a pilot here in the states is by and large harder.

More especially since you as an indvidual have to pay for all of your training unless your born wealthy or have parents willing to take out $50k loans for you.

Dunno tho wish America was like the rest of the world when it comes to airlines.

Fill out an application pass a few test then it's off to flight school. And upon sucessful completion of flight school there is a job waiting for you with the respective airline company.

Anyone know if it is like that in Canada or are they more like there neighbors to the south when it comes to airline training and wanting to be an airline pilot?


Matthew
 

Snowbird

New Member
If you are contemplating becoming a pilot, go for an intro flight as soon as possible. This will help to eradicate any misonceptions and stereotypes regarding flying. Being a fellow Torontonian, I can recommend some flight schools to ckeck out if you like.

The future of Air Canada looks promising over the next five to ten years with continual increases in retirements and the trend of moving to smaller jets. A degree is a must these days if you want to fly for the majors. I"m finishing my degree in Dec. and will then commence my commercial training. By the way, there are other airlines besides Air Canada that are doing very well at the present moment (ie. Westjet, Jetsgo).

In terms of working as a commercial pilot in the U.S., almost impossible for a Canadian. You have to have a first degree relative who lives there or know people in very high places. Canadians are exempt from the green card lottery. You do have the option of training in the U.S. though. The climate is a little more conducive to flight training.

Many pilots wear glasses but there is a certain correction cut-off which I'm not sure of. As for being Asian, ethnic background has nothing to do with your success or advancement as a pilot.

If you have any more questions PM me.
 
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