Regionals/ Reserves or Guard

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#21
The big thing is to be a pilot, Nav, or some other job which entails a year or more of intense schooling and training, that's a heck of a lot of work in addition to all the extra crap of the US military that's heaped upon its members, for someone who isn't truly wanting to be there and prepared to deal with a lot of extra crap that has nothing to do with flying at all.
 

BravoHotel

Well-Known Member
#22
The big thing is to be a pilot, Nav, or some other job which entails a year or more of intense schooling and training, that's a heck of a lot of work in addition to all the extra crap of the US military that's heaped upon its members, for someone who isn't truly wanting to be there and prepared to deal with a lot of extra crap that has nothing to do with flying at all.
DTS
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#23
And.......green dot training, the idiotic OPR/EPR system, masters degrees, career broadening and service schools whether online or in residence, idiotic additional duties, PT tests that hold far more importance to commanders than tactics/threat combat training for their own aircrews, and on, and on, and on. All crap that has the square root of jack chit to do with the expertise of the employment of airpower in combat, yet somehow is more important to the military so-called "leadership" than the mission of employing aircraft as the combat systems they are, in the full spectrum of their capabilities and in full spectrum combat ops......and more importantly, actually being top notch at doing it.

There are very valid reasons pilots are jumping ship from the services, particularly the AF. And it has nothing to do with money/pay. However, at least in the AF, senior leadership is too tone deaf, too head-in-the-sand, too kool-aid drinking, too careerist focused, and frankly too ignorant, stupid and self absorbed, to "get it".

We go to war against a peer enemy, and we are going to get a serious wake up call due to our failing in our military priorities for so long.
 

Flying Saluki

Well-Known Member
#24
Hey Guys,
I am looking for some either that's a good idea or a slap back to reality. I didn't know where to post this so I just posted it here. I am just at 1000 hours and I get the restricted ATP at 1250. I am 33 and realize that now is the time to get into the regionals and start working. On the other hand I am looking at the Guard or Reserves. I am non prior service so here lies the dilemma. I know by talking to units that getting an age waiver and lasik waiver to fly at my age is basically impossible so I am thinking of either aircrew positions which can take up to 2 years of training also. The other option is just joining as an officer and doing whatever in the state I currently live in. I know it is feasible to do this and I needed to act like 5 years ago put this is what I have to work with. I understand that the airlines are good at the moment but I have seen several friends that have been furloughed and played the game. I realize it only takes one thing and the industry can change in an instant and having a back up plan is not a bad idea. Also staying and getting the benefits and retirement wouldn't be bad either in the reserves/guard. Plus the main purpose is to serve my community and country(biggest reason). I am just wondering from guys out there with experience in this, is it worth it and is it a viable option. Does leaving the regionals for training and taking a step back from aviation and hours worth the time spent in the reserves/guard. I have heard from pilots out there to just get to the airlines, this is from a pilot that has done the reserves and has since retired from it and has been there and done that. Its easy to say something like that when you have accomplished the goal set ahead of you. Just looking for some guidance from people with experience in both industries. Thank you for your time. Also PM me if you really have a strong opinion on this.
Pardon me for sounding cynical, but why would you want to join now, at this point in your life? I applaud your willingness to serve, but why not 10-15 years ago? Why now?
 

tboydst

Well-Known Member
#25
Pardon me for sounding cynical, but why would you want to join now, at this point in your life? I applaud your willingness to serve, but why not 10-15 years ago? Why now?
Its a long story, but mostly been looking at it for years now. I always wanted to be a military pilot but didn't have the eye sight and lasik was not allowed or was not a well known alternative when I started college. I went to college for aviation and worked my way through but it took a long time to graduate. During that time I started revisiting the military idea but not as a pilot just other options. I finally got my degree around the age of 29 and started looking into warrant officer with the Army, took the tests went to MEPS and got turned down for the eyes again (which I knew were bad but was told as long as corrected to 20/20 I was ok). I then refocused on building hours to go to the regionals, but the military thing has stayed with me. Its the story I hear all the time "I wish I would have joined but this happened". I have now asked myself, after maturing, what is it about the military I want and its just the why not me feeling. I am not from a military family or an aviation family. Been learning this stuff as I go just like everybody else in my shoes. I should have gotten lasik but the timing has never been right. Those are all excuses and I have finally gotten tired of trying to find the perfect mos other than flying and realize I just need to do it. Hence being 33 years old and finally saying its time to you know or get off the pot.
 

n57flyguy

Well-Known Member
#26
And.......green dot training, the idiotic OPR/EPR system, masters degrees, career broadening and service schools whether online or in residence, idiotic additional duties, PT tests that hold far more importance to commanders than tactics/threat combat training for their own aircrews, and on, and on, and on. All crap that has the square root of jack chit to do with the expertise of the employment of airpower in combat, yet somehow is more important to the military so-called "leadership" than the mission of employing aircraft as the combat systems they are, in the full spectrum of their capabilities and in full spectrum combat ops......and more importantly, actually being top notch at doing it.

There are very valid reasons pilots are jumping ship from the services, particularly the AF. And it has nothing to do with money/pay. However, at least in the AF, senior leadership is too tone deaf, too head-in-the-sand, too kool-aid drinking, too careerist focused, and frankly too ignorant, stupid and self absorbed, to "get it".

We go to war against a peer enemy, and we are going to get a serious wake up call due to our failing in our military priorities for so long.
Mustache outta regs? :)
 

USN88

Well-Known Member
#28
I've thought about this as well, a lot lately, actually. Not neccesarly to fly in the ANG, but coming back in as an O and serving in some other capacity. I was an enlisted Navy guy right out of high school and have missed the feeling of military service and brotherhood.

I just turned 30 and am at that big Purple box hauler airline.

Thoughts?
 
#29
I've thought about this as well, a lot lately, actually. Not neccesarly to fly in the ANG, but coming back in as an O and serving in some other capacity. I was an enlisted Navy guy right out of high school and have missed the feeling of military service and brotherhood.

I just turned 30 and am at that big Purple box hauler airline.

Thoughts?
Do you like giving up money? If so, do it.
 

Low&Slow

Well-Known Member
#30
I've thought about this as well, a lot lately, actually. Not neccesarly to fly in the ANG, but coming back in as an O and serving in some other capacity. I was an enlisted Navy guy right out of high school and have missed the feeling of military service and brotherhood.

I just turned 30 and am at that big Purple box hauler airline.

Thoughts?
Hell nah! Not Active Duty. Sounds like a flawless plan for disappointment and regret.
Stay where you are and join a local club or a volunteer/charity group of some kind. You can build lifelong friends and become "family" there too.
If you really want to go back into the military though, ANG might not be too bad, depending on how much you will have to fly (if you become flightcrew). If you decide do it, do it for the long haul and retire from it.
 
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