REGIONAL HOURS

bap327

New Member
Question for the regional fo's. How many hours a month are you flying and out of those hours how many are you logging as PIC? Just curious as to how long it takes to accumulate PIC hours when you are always SIC.
 

PeanuckleCRJ

Poodle Wrangler
None PIC...not until i get to strap on that fourth stripe....



I'm on reserve now.... will get around 60-75 hours this month...


will have a line next month- lines average around these parts at 84-87 hours. yee ha!
 

IrishSheepdog

Sitting in the median
I'm a line holder, and fly around 75-80 hours a month. All logged as SIC. If I decided to fly Continuous Duty Overnights (standups) as a line holder, I'd only be flying around 50-60 hours a month, max.
 

bap327

New Member
Ok, thanks for the reply's. I thought that some of the time could be logged. Guess I have to keep reading the books.
 

8LegDay

New Member
When we are short on people I am flying 100-110 hours a month (t/prop-120 max, jet-100).
Normally 75-85, if you have stand ups (short flights to an overnight and back in the morning) you are down to about 30-40 hours but they still pay you for 80-85.
Helps a lot if you live in your base - you can easily pick up extra time. Since I moved to my base I've been averaging 100/month with ~85 actually on my schedule.

No PIC until you upgrade.
Log approaches, instrument/night time only when you're PF-pilot flying.
Once you upgrade, if not on reserve you can log 1000 PIC in about a year.
 

av8trxx

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Question for the regional fo's. How many hours a month are you flying and out of those hours how many are you logging as PIC? Just curious as to how long it takes to accumulate PIC hours when you are always SIC.

[/ QUOTE ]

Being on reserve, I am not logging much time. In Jan I got just under 40 hours SIC doing airport ready reserve. In Feb I got 59 SIC hours on home reserve. I am not logging anywhere close to my pay guarantee, so I am glad we get paid for 75 hours of flying no matter what!

Upgrades are estimated at 5+ years, but may come down to 4+ after the a/c deliveries and hiring in 2004. So that's at least 4+ yrs of SIC before I'll see any PIC time.
 

Fearless

Dash Dominatrix
As a fourth-year F/O, I generally hold a regular line or composite line, and pick up "open" trips as my schedule permits. I usually average about 75 hours a month (all SIC). My total for the last 12 months is 860 hours, which is somewhat higher than the norm at my company (700 hours a year is typical).

FFFI
 

FL270

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Question for the regional fo's. How many hours a month are you flying and out of those hours how many are you logging as PIC? Just curious as to how long it takes to accumulate PIC hours when you are always SIC.

[/ QUOTE ]Keep in mind that in airliners under Part 121 SICs are required and that time can be logged legally ... far different from trying to log SIC in a Part 91 King Air or something like that. Sounds like you didn't realize that ...
 

Mavmb

Well-Known Member
So if you're a first officer on a regional airline flight you log for example SIC 3.9, total time 3.9, cross country 3.9, and what jet time 3.9????? Or do you even log everything anymore?
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Correct. I'm a 135 F/O and I log all of that (well...turbine, not jet), plus night (if applicable), multi, and instrument (whenever I'm 'sole manipulator').
 

IrishSheepdog

Sitting in the median
[ QUOTE ]
So if you're a first officer on a regional airline flight you log for example SIC 3.9, total time 3.9, cross country 3.9, and what jet time 3.9????? Or do you even log everything anymore?

[/ QUOTE ]

I log Total, AMEL, Turbine, Part 121 (those two are columns I created), Cross Country (not air returns or MX test flights), and SIC. Night, Actual, approaches and landings also if it applies.
 

blee256

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Correct. I'm a 135 F/O and I log all of that (well...turbine, not jet), plus night (if applicable), multi, and instrument (whenever I'm 'sole manipulator').

[/ QUOTE ]

what's the difference between turbine and jet?? Turbo-prop and turbojet is all turbine, isnt it?

-brian
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
More or less the same, but if you're looking to move to another job, it might make it a little easier to make a note of which turbine is "jet" and which is "turboprop".
 

IrishSheepdog

Sitting in the median
[ QUOTE ]
More or less the same, but if you're looking to move to another job, it might make it a little easier to make a note of which turbine is "jet" and which is "turboprop".

[/ QUOTE ]

That's right, because then the interviewer will know if you work for a living!!


[/shamelessturbopropplug]
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
On that note, I'm still subconsciously debating if I'd give extra credit to applicants with 'vintage' turboprop time (Electra!) or heavy multi-engine piston time (Convair, DC-3, etc) because they're hands-down more challenging to fly than a jet.

A Jet: Wanna go faster? Push up the throttles. Attain the desired speed, pull back the throttles.

A Recip: Wanna go faster? Increase the mixture, open the cowl flaps, increase prop RPM, increase manifold pressure, watch the boost! Perhaps open up the manual turbocharger wastegates a little. Monitor your engine instruments, reduce the manifold pressure, reset the prop RPM, relean the mixture, reset the manual wastegate (if needed), articulate the cowl flaps and make sure the CHT's are at a good temp.
 
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