Reasons for Amateurs to get Commercial Rating

DrBenny

New Member
I love flying, but it isn't going to be my career. That is beside the point in a way because I want to fly as precisely and professionaly as possible. I know that this is the main reason to go for the commercial rating; IOW, you have to hold yourself to ever higher standards in order to pass! But I have a few more questions:

1) Can you think of any other reason to get the commercial rating, even if you're not going to fly for your bread?

2) If one did get the rating, could one do occasional jobs? The only one I can think of which doesn't involve tons of paperwork and applications is becoming a CFI and taking an occasional student. This I might do, because I am a teacher and college prof. right now, so it might be fun to teach flying.

3) Here's the big question: can one take the IR and the comm rating training at the same time? How about the checkride?

Thanks for your thoughts!
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
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1) Can you think of any other reason to get the commercial rating, even if you're not going to fly for your bread?


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If you care to charge people for flights, other than fuel, etc.

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2) If one did get the rating, could one do occasional jobs? The only one I can think of which doesn't involve tons of paperwork and applications is becoming a CFI and taking an occasional student. This I might do, because I am a teacher and college prof. right now, so it might be fun to teach flying.

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Could tow banners, drop parachute jumpers, etc.

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3) Here's the big question: can one take the IR and the comm rating training at the same time? How about the checkride?


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Yes. I did it myself. Went from Private ASMEL to Comm AMEL-I on one checkride at Riddle. Bitch of a ride. Don't know if it's still done that way.

MD
 

flyallday

Well-Known Member
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3) Here's the big question: can one take the IR and the comm rating training at the same time? How about the checkride?

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At american flyers they have a program where you can do that
 

JaceTheAce

Well-Known Member
Yeah, I'd say you could have a fun weekend job towing banners! That'd be pretty fun, plus you get paid to fly.
 

ananoman

New Member
I would recommend getting your instrument rating first. Then practice the commercial maneuvers and take the commercial checkride. The checkrides are over totally different maneuvers, so why not focus on each one separately.
 

Acadia

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
1) Can you think of any other reason to get the commercial rating, even if you're not going to fly for your bread?

If you care to charge people for flights, other than fuel, etc.


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Keep in mind you cant always charge for your time even with a commercial and in many instances you need to be very careful how the money flows to be legal. For example you can’t own an aircraft and charge passengers for the flight (you would be acting as an air carrier & be holding out) without a 135 certificate (though perhaps you could do scenic flights within 25nm of the airport under part 91). You can be paid to fly someone else’s aircraft with little worries. If you are renting an aircraft you have to be able to have the party you are transporting pay for the plane directly to the owner (the money cant pass through you to the owner).

The best and most likely monetary benefit is that you could work for someone else as a pilot. As mentioned already this could mean many cool part time or weekend jobs flying for fun & getting a little money to boot!

Another nice benefit is improving your skills and confidence as a pilot earning a commercial license. Getting your instrument ticket will also do wonders for your skills as a pilot, so certainly get that along the way if you haven’t already.
 

sbav8r

New Member
1) Can you think of any other reason to get the commercial rating, even if you're not going to fly for your bread?

Improve your pilot skills, lower insurance, tax write off for travel expense when going to conference or seminar, you have the get a bi-annual anyway, why not upgrade the certificate.

2) If one did get the rating, could one do occasional jobs? The only one I can think of which doesn't involve tons of paperwork and applications is becoming a CFI and taking an occasional student. This I might do, because I am a teacher and college prof. right now, so it might be fun to teach flying.

Skydivers, if your into that sorta thing. Eventually maybe you could fly someones twin for them on a part time or on call basis.

3) Here's the big question: can one take the IR and the comm rating training at the same time? How about the checkride?

You would want to complete the IFR rating before getting the Comercial certificate, otherwise you would not have Instrument priveleges on your Commercial certificate. Look up the regs 61.129 (a) and see how much of the required flight time you already meet. Then base your IFR training around fullfilling those requirements as well the requirements for the IFR rating 61.65 TT, XC, Night, etc... Find a good instructor and make a plan to meet the requirements in the most effecient manner possible.

Good luck let us know what you decide.
 

PurduePilot

New Member
If you have the time and money, I would do it just for the challenge.

I know a number of people that have actually maxed out their pilot ratings (all the way up to ATP) for the sake of doing so, and then got their A&Ps -- all for the challenge of doing so.

Remember the more licenses you have, the more experience you will gain.
 

pavelump

Well-Known Member
Well, referring to FAR 119.1 (e) (in my best Simpson's scientist voice), without working for a commercial operator, you could perform (assuming you're just a fixed wing pilot)

1. Student instruction (with a CFI cert., duh...)

2. Non-stop sightseeing tours (within 25 statute mile radius)

3. Ferry or training flights

4. Aerial work operations including crop dusting, banner towing, aerial photography or survey, fire fighting, and powerline or pipeline patrol.


Can you tell that I'm about to take my commercial checkride/oral?


Dave
 

davetheflyer

New Member
Good job, Dave.

I was just about to point out that you wouldn't want to just go out and start flying people for money. If you do something to resemble an air taxi operator, you'd better have a 135 certificate if you want to keep your commercial license!
 
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