railroad to pilot-buying plane

splash333

Well-Known Member
I'm looking for some input on my situation, I'm 31 and furloughed from the railroad, I have a degree but it isn't worth much as far as getting a new job. I will most likely have to find a job while I train even if its lower paying. I am interested in pilot training and am considering buying a plane for training and time building. I'm pretty set on a 150/152 due to initial cost, and overall affordability. I found this on ebay and it seems well equipped and maintained although the price is a bit higher than I wanted. Any thoughts on if this would be a good deal www.ebay.com/itm/1976-Cessna-150-M-Aerobat-Airplane/333406803195
 

JeppUpdater

Well-Known Member
I think it’s overpriced. Just 300 hours from TBO with a very basic cockpit.

From your perspective it would be fine for a private and the tailwheel skills are invaluable, but it doesn’t have the equipment to do any sort of instrument training so you’d be back looking for a rental or another plane as soon as you hit that point.
 

splash333

Well-Known Member
I think it’s overpriced. Just 300 hours from TBO with a very basic cockpit.

From your perspective it would be fine for a private and the tailwheel skills are invaluable, but it doesn’t have the equipment to do any sort of instrument training so you’d be back looking for a rental or another plane as soon as you hit that point.
is there anyway to add equipment to get it instrument rated or what that might cost?
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
Have you flown in small airplanes? Have you made sure you can get a medical? Do you have mechanical aptitude and an aircraft mechanic buddy you can trade beer and flight time to in exchange for maintenance?
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
There are lots of 150's out there. I've owned about 6 different ones and different times. Look at barnstormers.com I'd try to find one with at least min IFR equipment, and ILS receiver at least, and a IFR GPS set up would be nice. An Aerobat is rare and the ebay guy knows that. You don't need an Aerobat as bad as you need something capable for IFR training. It's possible you will find a 152 as well. I second Roger Roger's advice. Being friends with a mechanic is priceless and/or finding one that is willing to let you do some work on the plane under his supervision. The more mechanically inclined you are the better. If nothing else, shop around for maintenance, seek other owners advice, and don't be afraid of the one man operation at a small airport if other recommend them.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
The Cessnas are pretty overpriced these days. Look for a Cherokee 140. Bonus if it's been upgraded to the 150.

But ya, what Roger said.

Also, I find this incredibly interesting. During the crap times for pilots 10 years ago, I remember a few guys going off to be engineers/conductors(can't remember how those two terms are correctly used).
 

splash333

Well-Known Member
yes generally you get hired as a conductor then upgrade a engineer many years later based on seniority. The railroads have really taken a dive and new technology has reduced the need for 2 crew members and the class 1 railroads are pushing for one man crews even as the make record profits. I was hired a couple years ago and left a decent paying job. They said they really needed people and seemed like a good career. Now there are guys with 7 years out of work. Really need to move on and may need to get a cdl and drive trucks to bridge the gap. I would like to pursue pilot training full time to get on the hiring wave before its too late.
 

splash333

Well-Known Member
I'm pretty set on a 150 because I know they are cheap, have parts available, low operating costs and probably all mechanics know them well. Money will be the largest driving factor and I feel like owning will give me the most for the money. And can also use to build time and hopefully split time with others to reduce cost until qualified for a job.
 
The Cessnas are pretty overpriced these days. Look for a Cherokee 140. Bonus if it's been upgraded to the 150.

But ya, what Roger said.

Also, I find this incredibly interesting. During the crap times for pilots 10 years ago, I remember a few guys going off to be engineers/conductors(can't remember how those two terms are correctly used).
I came here to say this. Cessnas aren’t as “cheap” as they used to be, it’s ridiculous.
I'm pretty set on a 150 because I know they are cheap, have parts available, low operating costs and probably all mechanics know them well. Money will be the largest driving factor and I feel like owning will give me the most for the money. And can also use to build time and hopefully split time with others to reduce cost until qualified for a job.
First make sure you can pass at least a second class medical, maybe get a first class. Next take an introductory flight, or if you know someone who has a plane see if they can take you up. Then broaden your horizons in aircraft and read up on aircraft ownership, ain’t nothin cheap about it. Plenty of superior Piper aircraft for sale for less than a comparable Cessna (Cherokee and Tripacer/Colt come to mind). Good luck and enjoy the journey!
 
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