Quick Question

PlaneGeek19

Member
Hello this is my first post so if this is answered already Sorry did not look hard enough I guess. I am going to Green River Community College in Auburn, Washington working on two Associates in Applied Science- Air Traffic Control and Airline Dispatch. On the Dispatching side of things they have an Airline Dispatcher Completion which is just a Certificate of Completion. My Question is Should I go for that take the examination and then continue to work on the two AAS and work as a dispatcher or should I just go for the degrees then try to get Job? Basically what looks better to say Alaska or Horizon since I will be in the Seattle area
 

PlaneGeek19

Member
You don't need a degree to dispatch. Just the Airman's Certificate.
Figured looked good to have it and plus Also works as stop gap( I just looked at ((http://forums.jetcareers.com/threads/interested-in-dispatch.192697/)) turns out you have to be 23 to actually dispatch at something like AS or Horizon) but figured if I had Certificate and was working on degree or had both would look good for me to get a job in Crew Scheduling or something like that till I turn 23
 

MT

Well-Known Member
You can not actually receive the airman's certificate until your 23rd birthday. You would instead receive a letter of aeronautical competency to be redeemed for an airman's certificate on your 23rd birthday. The dispatch certificate tells aviation employers regardless of if you are going to dispatch that you do possess a bit of knowledge and it keeps your options open. Not a bad thing to have.
 

PlaneGeek19

Member
You can not actually receive the airman's certificate until your 23rd birthday. You would instead receive a letter of aeronautical competency to be redeemed for an airman's certificate on your 23rd birthday. The dispatch certificate tells aviation employers regardless of if you are going to dispatch that you do possess a bit of knowledge and it keeps your options open. Not a bad thing to have.
So for now get the two degrees wait two years but look around and see if they will offer me a job in another position or something till I turn 23? (I should be 21 by the time I get out of GRCC)
 

BayouMLU

Well-Known Member
The degrees won't hurt you but I don't know if they would necessarily help you. I'd never say that more knowledge is bad. I just don't know that it would be thst useful. Airline experience of any kind or a pilot's license would probably give you more of an edge. Some stuff just can't be taught in a classroom.

Also, be prepared to move. Especially for your first gig. Horizon and Alaska are great companies to work for and I'm not sure that they hire that often. If you have your heart set on just those two, I'd try to get any job to get my foot in the door. The closer to SOC, the better.
 

PlaneGeek19

Member
The degrees won't hurt you but I don't know if they would necessarily help you. I'd never say that more knowledge is bad. I just don't know that it would be thst useful. Airline experience of any kind or a pilot's license would probably give you more of an edge. Some stuff just can't be taught in a classroom.

Also, be prepared to move. Especially for your first gig. Horizon and Alaska are great companies to work for and I'm not sure that they hire that often. If you have your heart set on just those two, I'd try to get any job to get my foot in the door. The closer to SOC, the better.
I dont have my heart set set on them just would love to stay in Seattle but if I have to move fine and on the pilot's license front about to go take the written so I can get my student pilots certificate then when I go to Seattle on the weekends and maybe days where I don't have class going up to Renton or maybe Boeing Field and take flight training out of one of those two airports
 

Metalmike

Well-Known Member
I have been eyeing Horizon since I got my license over a year ago, and I only saw them hiring once, and it was very very brief. The posting was up for maybe a couple days tops. By the way, I believe Horizon's HQ is in Portland, not Seattle.
 

nyk

Well-Known Member
The degrees won't hurt you but I don't know if they would necessarily help you. I'd never say that more knowledge is bad. I just don't know that it would be thst useful. Airline experience of any kind or a pilot's license would probably give you more of an edge. Some stuff just can't be taught in a classroom.

Also, be prepared to move. Especially for your first gig. Horizon and Alaska are great companies to work for and I'm not sure that they hire that often. If you have your heart set on just those two, I'd try to get any job to get my foot in the door. The closer to SOC, the better.
it's not necessary but it is sometimes preferred in so application I've applied for.
 

Twin Mama Mel

Aviator Mama
You can take the dispatch exam at 21, even though you won't get your certificate until you're 23. I would finish the degrees and then go ahead and get my certificate. You could work in a supplemental operation at 21 and gain experience, because they do not require dispatchers by the regulations. The degrees will give you an extra edge and the airlines like to see them; even though they're not required it is often preferred and can get you an interview when you otherwise might be passed up.
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
I have been eyeing Horizon since I got my license over a year ago, and I only saw them hiring once, and it was very very brief. The posting was up for maybe a couple days tops. By the way, I believe Horizon's HQ is in Portland, not Seattle.
You are correct. Alaska dipatch office is in SEA, Horizon in PDX.
 

womanpilot73

Well-Known Member
BayouMLU said:
The degrees won't hurt you but I don't know if they would necessarily help you. I'd never say that more knowledge is bad. I just don't know that it would be thst useful.
I don't agree with this. Of two people with experience applying for a dispatch position, I think some employers will often choose one with a degree to interview over one without a degree. My first boss told me point blank that he likes to see a degree on a resume, as it shows that the person can not only start something, but commit to finish it. Also, I've been told by numerous people in the industry that the airlines do "prefer" to see a degree. Just my $.02.
 

PlaneFan82

Well-Known Member
You could work in a supplemental operation at 21 and gain experience, because they do not require dispatchers by the regulations.
.
Most supplementals in the US require dispatch certificates, or the ability to obtain one within 6 months of hire, which means you have to be 23 to work there.
 

Twin Mama Mel

Aviator Mama
.
Most supplementals in the US require dispatch certificates, or the ability to obtain one within 6 months of hire, which means you have to be 23 to work there.
I know several that will take the letter saying you passed the test in lieu of a certificate and hire you at 21. I used to teach so I've been in contact with several supplementals who will do this.
 

BayouMLU

Well-Known Member
I don't agree with this. Of two people with experience applying for a dispatch position, I think some employers will often choose one with a degree to interview over one without a degree. My first boss told me point blank that he likes to see a degree on a resume, as it shows that the person can not only start something, but commit to finish it. Also, I've been told by numerous people in the industry that the airlines do "prefer" to see a degree. Just my $.02.
In my 16 years in commercial aviation, my experience is just the opposite. Personality and demeanor rank higher than education. You can train for the job, but a • attitude tends to stick with someone regardless of circumstances. I'm sure every hiring manager is different, but having been involved with recruiting for most of those 16 years and different carriers from Regionals to Majors I have yet to see someone not get hired because they didn't hold an unessessary degree. I'm sure there s someone out there that hires differently. I just haven't met them or heard a second hand reference until now so it's definitely in the minority and again, not required. Probably because outside of medical school, law school, etc college does little to prepare people for the realities of the workforce.

In my case, my airline experience has defintely given me an edge as a Dispatcher and every interview has made mention of this. No one seemed disappointed that I didn't finish college. I realize that's anecdotal, but it supported my previous experiences in recruiting. The education isn't bad. I'm just not sure its as useful as working the front lines. If the OP has started, by all means continue. It can only help you.

It's all good, womanpilot73! :cool:
 
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womanpilot73

Well-Known Member
BayouMLU said:
In my 16 years in commercial aviation, my experience is just the opposite. Personality and demeanor rank higher than education. You can train for the job, but a • attitude tends to stick with someone regardless of circumstances. I'm sure every hiring manager is different, but having been involved with recruiting for most of those 16 years and different carriers from Regionals to Majors I have yet to see someone not get hired because they didn't hold an unessessary degree. I'm sure there s someone out there that hires differently. I just haven't met them or heard a second hand reference until now so it's definitely in the minority and again, not required. Probably because outside of medical school, law school, etc college does little to prepare people for the realities of the workforce. In my case, my airline experience has defintely given me an edge as a Dispatcher and every interview has made mention of this. No one seemed disappointed that I didn't finish college. I realize that's anecdotal, but it supported my previous experiences in recruiting. The education isn't bad. I'm just not sure its as useful as working the front lines. If the OP has started, by all means continue. It can only help you. It's all good, womanpilot73! :cool:
Well this is quite interesting, as what you are saying is the opposite of what everyone I speak with has told me. Of course I agree that experience and personality are a HUGE part of it. My point was that when weeding through resumes, prior to even knowing whether or not someone has a good attitude or great personality, getting chosen to interview has a lot to do with what's on that resume that sets you apart. And if there are two resumes of people that have equal levels of experience, having a degree can make one stand out over the other and at "some" airlines, it is preferred.

In the end, it really does depend on the individual airline, the hiring manager and what they are looking for. Not arguing with your 16 years of experience in commercial aviation or your years spent in recruiting. Just going off of my own personal experience as well as info shared with me by others who have been in the game for several years.

Either way, having an education will never hurt you :)
 

Aeroscout840

Well-Known Member
The job market is always changing. In the old days things moved slower. Now the market can change multiple times per year. Currenty, a 4-year degree will help people starting their career move in and up much faster.

As competitive as it is for the few thousand top-tier jobs in the US, get a degree. Personality and competence are assumed for any one in serious contention for a job at a major.
 
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