Question - Instrument Currency

Michigan_Flyer

Well-Known Member
While flying as a CFII, If my student flies an instrument approach in actual IMC, can I log it in my logbook to count towards my own instrument currency?
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Doc's Forum talked about this a while back.

CFII thread

I don't log student's approaches toward my currency based on this.

[/ QUOTE ]

Using Doc's line of thinking (nothing beats hands-on flying...), then a pilot should not log the approach if the autopilot flies the approach....hmmmm.
 

Visceral

Well-Known Member
Thats why I think the best instrument flyers out there would have to be 135 freight dogs. No auto pilot, no co-pilot, no flight director, etc.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Thats why I think the best instrument flyers out there would have to be 135 freight dogs. No auto pilot, no co-pilot, no flight director, etc.

[/ QUOTE ]

That's the world I lived in for a number of years. Nothing like having a beat-up Lance/Caravan/Navajo-Chieftain to tool around in hard IFR with.......

But oddly enough, even with the beat-up equipment, there was a note of pride and some satisfaction from recovering to a field out of an NDB or VOR circling approach at mins. I came into Winslow, AZ once during a moderate snowstorm in a PA-31 Navajo and upon breakout, had to circle for winds (VOR 11, circle to RW 4). WX was snow/freezing drizzle, about 600/1, and I had a frozen co-pilot windshield, was cycling the wing/tail boots, but the hot props didn't appear to be working, since ice would sling off the props into the nose ice shields every 30 seconds or so. I couldn't see the airfield, but did manage to spot a Cessna 441 Conquest parked all by it's lonesome with snow all around it, but couldn't make out the runways or taxiway, plowing hadn't occurred yet and wasn't going to apparently. I was able to maintain circling MDA, could maintain this "airport environment" (of a single parked plane) in sight and could remain within 1.5 miles of the field, so I circled dirty around the airport until I could make out some semblance of which snow strip was actually the runway (the runway lights were covered in snow), and proceeded to land. Upon landing, there was no need for brakes since the snow decelerated the aircraft quick enough; and once I could find a taxiway exit, I was able to generally make out the airport layout based on the positioning of the Conquest, the terminal building, and the lone UPS truck sitting on the ramp. Called FSS to have them pass to ZAB Center that I was actually on the ground. After parking, the UPS guy came over holding a large and heavy chunk of ice shaped like the nose of my Navajo, that had just come off the Navajo's nose. There was varying amounts of ice all over everywhere that didn't have deice or anti-ice protection.

After unloading my boxes and getting my sleeping bag set up in the cargo area, there was time to reflect on a sense of accomplishment in having been able to make the mission happen. As freight dogs, that's what we do. Had I not been able to use some of the breaks I was given on the approach, it would've been missed, try it again, then divert. But a little ingenuity and a few breaks go a long way.
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
Thats why I think the best instrument flyers out there would have to be 135 freight dogs. No auto pilot, no co-pilot, no flight director, etc.

[/ QUOTE ]

That's the world I lived in for a number of years. Nothing like having a beat-up Lance/Caravan/Navajo-Chieftain to tool around in hard IFR with.......

But oddly enough, even with the beat-up equipment, there was a note of pride and some satisfaction from recovering to a field out of an NDB or VOR circling approach at mins. I came into Winslow, AZ once during a moderate snowstorm in a PA-31 Navajo and upon breakout, had to circle for winds (VOR 11, circle to RW 4). WX was snow/freezing drizzle, about 600/1, and I had a frozen co-pilot windshield, was cycling the wing/tail boots, but the hot props didn't appear to be working, since ice would sling off the props into the nose ice shields every 30 seconds or so. I couldn't see the airfield, but did manage to spot a Cessna 441 Conquest parked all by it's lonesome with snow all around it, but couldn't make out the runways or taxiway, plowing hadn't occurred yet and wasn't going to apparently. I was able to maintain circling MDA, could maintain this "airport environment" (of a single parked plane) in sight and could remain within 1.5 miles of the field, so I circled dirty around the airport until I could make out some semblance of which snow strip was actually the runway (the runway lights were covered in snow), and proceeded to land. Upon landing, there was no need for brakes since the snow decelerated the aircraft quick enough; and once I could find a taxiway exit, I was able to generally make out the airport layout based on the positioning of the Conquest, the terminal building, and the lone UPS truck sitting on the ramp. Called FSS to have them pass to ZAB Center that I was actually on the ground. After parking, the UPS guy came over holding a large and heavy chunk of ice shaped like the nose of my Navajo, that had just come off the Navajo's nose. There was varying amounts of ice all over everywhere that didn't have deice or anti-ice protection.

After unloading my boxes and getting my sleeping bag set up in the cargo area, there was time to reflect on a sense of accomplishment in having been able to make the mission happen. As freight dogs, that's what we do. Had I not been able to use some of the breaks I was given on the approach, it would've been missed, try it again, then divert. But a little ingenuity and a few breaks go a long way.

[/ QUOTE ]

Personally, I think that's what it's all about....
 
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