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Question about night shots

Discussion in 'Pictures From The Road' started by Box hauler, Apr 15, 2017.

  1. Box hauler

    Box hauler Well-Known Member

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    so I am doing some video editing and making a time lapse and I was wondering how people make low light video that is so clear and bright, is it the camera, software or both? Also how to people add the stars to night shots? Thanks for any info
     
  2. Cessnaflyer

    Cessnaflyer Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

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  3. gotWXdagain

    gotWXdagain Highly Visible Member

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    Mostl the camera capabilities, especially high ISO and noise performance.
     
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  4. Roger Roger

    Roger Roger Navajo Whisperer

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    When doing night shots just remember beer before liquor, never been sicker.
     
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  5. BobDDuck

    BobDDuck Gone whale watching...

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    The lower the ISO the less you'll see, but the higher the ISO the more noise you'll get in the image.

    Stars normally start appearing when you leave the shutter open for a few seconds or longer. If you leave it open too long you'll start to get star trails.
     
  6. gotWXdagain

    gotWXdagain Highly Visible Member

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    There's actually a nice guide on the subject, that correlates focal length to exposure time:

    https://petapixel.com/2015/01/06/avoid-star-trails-following-500-rule/
     
  7. BobDDuck

    BobDDuck Gone whale watching...

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  8. mikecweb

    mikecweb Third Generation Arizonan

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    I'm sure you know this but those applying the rule make sure you use a 1.6x multiplier if shooting with a crop sensor.
     
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  9. gotWXdagain

    gotWXdagain Highly Visible Member

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    I've been pretty successful with it at 10mm on a Canon sensor. Maybe try a "450" rule and upping your ISO/Aperture if possible?
     
  10. BobDDuck

    BobDDuck Gone whale watching...

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    I've always used 1.4x? That could be part of it.

    That's actually what I do. The biggest problem I have mostly though is light pollution.
     
  11. gotWXdagain

    gotWXdagain Highly Visible Member

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    Light pollution is killer. Here's one I did last year out in the middle of BF nowhere:

    N8421E KSUO 6 websmall.jpg

    ISO 4000, 20 seconds f/5.6, 10mm on a Canon 70D. There was a flood light behind the camera shining on the airplane, otherwise I'd have probably gone to 30 seconds and ISO 6000.
     
  12. Ozelot

    Ozelot Well-Known Member

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    well, you got Alderbaran and Pleiades in there. I'd say that is a win!
     
  13. drunkenbeagle

    drunkenbeagle Gang Member

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    Use a tripod, stop down to the sharpest aperature (usually f/8), use the camera's meter with film, or take some test shots to figure the exposure with digital. Wide lenses tend to work better. At least, that's what I do. Heat shimmer and moisture will mess things up, so cold dry places will yield sharper results. Has always worked for me.

    If you are doing time lapse, well, have an intervalometer. And you are at the mercy of your camera's meter at that point too, if the exposure is going to change. Easier if the light doesn't change.
     
  14. Bandit_Driver

    Bandit_Driver Gold Member

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    Pm adler he does a lot of stuff and night and has some cool shots.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

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