Question about Atlantic Crossings...

John_Jones

New Member
Guys,
Dont know if this topic forum is the best for the question, but in my mind it as (feel free to move it if it needs to be done). I had a question for any one that is familiar with Atlantic Ocean crossings. I wondered about this the other day when watching a television show, are aircraft making an atlantic crossing allowed to go South of the Sierra Oscar? Thanks...
 

I_Money

Moderator
I have no clue where that location is however the main factores for crossing teh pond is ETOPS and the jetstream - once we went south of Ireland into LHR and damn was it bumpy!
 

Visceral

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Guys,
Dont know if this topic forum is the best for the question, but in my mind it as (feel free to move it if it needs to be done). I had a question for any one that is familiar with Atlantic Ocean crossings. I wondered about this the other day when watching a television show, are aircraft making an atlantic crossing allowed to go South of the Sierra Oscar? Thanks...

[/ QUOTE ]

I've been across the atlantic a few times and have no idea what you are referring to by Sierra Oscar.
 

John_Jones

New Member
Hmmm. I have no idea either thought one of you could explain what it meant. Heard it on television and dint understand it. Owe well never mind...
 

seagull

Well-Known Member
Having just flown two Atlantic crossings in the last week, with 6 more scheduled in the next month (with many previous ones under my belt over the past 15 years), and as someone that teaches new pilots (line check airman), I can honestly say I've never heard of the term "sierra oscar".
 

John_Jones

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Having just flown two Atlantic crossings in the last week, with 6 more scheduled in the next month (with many previous ones under my belt over the past 15 years), and as someone that teaches new pilots (line check airman), I can honestly say I've never heard of the term "sierra oscar".

[/ QUOTE ]
Well maybe you can awnser this, why do I feel like such a dumbass at this moment?
 

js747400

New Member
Did a little research on google, and found this:

If you ever pick up Concorde on its transatlantic tracks on HF you hear the alt. reports around FL52 (much higher than 46) for its 30 dgs West report. If you didn't already know Concorde has 2 dedicated corridors to NA designated as Sierra Oscar and Sierra Mike. These unlike the normal NA tracks do not vary on a daily basis as do tracks A through G (it may go higher but this would be too far south for me.) These other tracks vary depending on the prevailing wind /jetsream directions and strengths I understand. suspect some mil. traffic also goes higher than 46.


So evidently they are Concorde's version of NAT. I thought it sounded familiar...
 

Mr_Creepy

Well-Known Member
Well I never flew the concord so I guess I never heard of Sierra Oscar either.

My Evergreen B747 friend says he hadn't heard it either. huh.
 

John_Jones

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
If you ever pick up Concorde on its transatlantic tracks on HF you hear the alt. reports around FL52 (much higher than 46) for its 30 dgs West report. If you didn't already know Concorde has 2 dedicated corridors to NA designated as Sierra Oscar and Sierra Mike. These unlike the normal NA tracks do not vary on a daily basis as do tracks A through G (it may go higher but this would be too far south for me.) These other tracks vary depending on the prevailing wind /jetsream directions and strengths I understand. suspect some mil. traffic also goes higher than 46.

[/ QUOTE ]
I KNEW I didnt make it up
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
There are 3 supersonic tracks over the Atlantic Ocean:
SM
SN
SO

6 eastbound jet tracks are normally used:
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

6 westbound tracks are normally used:
A
B
C
D
E
F

Additionally, more tracks can be used on some days due to any number of circumstances including sun spots, weather, etc.

Nick
 

aloft

New Member
The 777 ORD-LHR DVD I have had the crew on track Sierra; something about ETOPS limitations on the more southerly tracks.
 
Top