Q Codes

moxiepilot

Well-Known Member
The internet broke me today.

In the interest of nerd-dom I was looking into if QFE, QNE, QNH stood for something or how the useage came about. Thanks Wikipedia!

Not only did I learn some cool nerd stuff but now I really want to transmit things like: "OMG QAZ!" and "WTF QDL?"

Thanks internet :)

Q code - Wikipedia
 

bLizZuE

Fly airplanes, drink beer, never at the same time.
American used to set their altimeters to QNE so that when they landed the altimeter always read zero.
 

bLizZuE

Fly airplanes, drink beer, never at the same time.
I taught Swiss and German students long ago and was well versed in the Qs. No more.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
Ham Radio thing. Used to apply to DF steers and 100 other things.

Great if you were stuck using Morse.
 

Stone Cold

Well-Known Member
QFE is good for skydivers and people who enjoy CFITs.
Really...hmm. never knew. ;) QFE works great, lasts long time. AA's problem in Bradley was it was a non precision, and they didn't update the baro setting. It would have happened either QFE or QNH.
 

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
Best tip I received for setting QNH (Altitude) and QNE (Flight Levels) - Use the “A” in Altitude and the “V” in Flight LeVel as an arrow indicating when (e.g. climbing or descending) to switch to QNE or QNH.

So if you’re climbing on a departure and you have a different Altitude and Flight Level (so NOT US or Canada), you are looking for the Transition Altitude for switching to QNE. You are transitioning from Altitude to Flight Levels at that point.

When descending, you are looking for the Flight Level transition to switch to QNH. You are transitioning from Flight Levels to Altitude at that point.
 
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z987k

Well-Known Member
Really...hmm. never knew. ;) QFE works great, lasts long time. AA's problem in Bradley was it was a non precision, and they didn't update the baro setting. It would have happened either QFE or QNH.
It works ok provided there's no terrain anywhere near you.
 
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