Q about flying tecnique

jetman

New Member
When flying the final approach in a light aircraftat an speed higher than normal , what is the best tecnique to slow down to landing speed in the shortest possible distance ?
My question relates the instances when ATC request to "keep your speed up " and after landing to exit the runway
ASAP .
Flying a C-172 under this conditions i keep a flater approach than normal[ less energy to disipate] 110 KIAS flaps 10 ,over the fence power off nose up and full flaps at 85kias ,i also try to do all this high enough over the runway to avoid ground effect.So far it has worked OK with a good headwind but im wondering about the days or nights when wind is not on my side
I would appreciate comments .Thanks very much jetman
 

pscraig

Well-Known Member
My solution to this problem is to be accomodating to ATC only to a point. I will fly most of the approach faster (100-105) but start bringing back the power and adding flaps earlier than you do, on about a quarter to half mile final, so that by the time I am over the fence I am performing a completely normal landing. By doing this and exiting the runway promptly you are flying safe and accomodating the controller. I was in this situation frequently going into FLL (=insane traffic), and this method works well.
 

Eagle

New Member
I agree with the above post, telling a 172 to keep the speed up is silly.

Once on final, about 300/500ft agl, pull the power and pitch up, you will bleed the speed off pretty quick.

If ATC tells you to speed up some more, the approved reply is:

Unable: I need to land bonehead..

Ok just the first part...
 

jetman

New Member
Tnx for comments guys, this situation is common at night at the local airport,when all traffic ,[ airline corporate GA] is funnel to a single 9000' runway ,light aircraft ,some doing circuits ,dont seem to have a big priority in the system . "extend your downwind i call your base" the 'dont callme i callyou" kind of approach is almost automatic if unable to comply with previous request and an hour of intended training is cut in half by been sent all over the place
.
Any way, i like to improve my flying skills [and that is not a small task//////////] and learn how to get the best performance out of the airplane i apreciate the comments
Take care jetman
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
....and if you have to go around because you're too fast on final; you have to do it all over again. It's the same thing when you speak so fast that you have to 'say again'. Sometimes 'saving time' has the opposite effect.

100% of the time when I've been 'unable' to do something I've never had any problems. They'll just acknowledge and deal with it.
 

I_Money

Moderator
Flying fast finals is quite common around here (not so much into LAX believe it or not - I have been asked to slow down a few times going in there in a C-172). I agree with the everyone else, come in fast till a mile or 2 then slow it down, the nice thing is the runways are so long running of the end really is not an issue.
 

I_Money

Moderator
[ QUOTE ]
100% of the time when I've been 'unable' to do something I've never had any problems. They'll just acknowledge and deal with it.


[/ QUOTE ]

What about the controller moaning at us gonig out of LAX when we were trying to maintain VFR by making a 10 degree right turn to go throw a cloud!! He wanted to watch you scud run it out of there.
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
If you really have to go into big airports (I do quite often), and you want to avoid wearing out your welcome with the local controllers, learn to keep that speed up!! Just like everyone has said, never compromise safety, for a controller, an airline crew or anybody. That said, try flying into Charlotte, or Nashville or Memphis (especially during one of the FEDEX push times) without complying with a speed reduction request. I leanred my lesson when I told them that I couldn't comply in Memphis, and proceeded to vector me into the hold over the Holly Springs VOR, and to expect further in 30 minutes. I quickly became comfortable with keeping my speed at 110 IAS until passing a 1-mile final.

My technique is actually pretty simple. If you can, right when you're about a mile or two out on final, just stop descending, and go power to almost idle. Your airspeed will start to come down pretty quickly. You're safe, because you're still above the glidepath, and you can very easily get into the white arc to get some flaps in. Once that's done, trim the plane, adjust the power and you can fly that last 3/4 of a mile at a normal approach speed (albeit a little high). That extra altitude will work itself out as you get 30 degrees of flaps of so.

Get out and practive this technique, and tell me what you think....don't try it the first time with a heavy 757 breathing down your next....that would suck
 

lilrkt

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
There's always the option of the popular forward-slip to no-flap landing.

[/ QUOTE ]

I actually like to take these opportunities to practice my no flap landings. When they say exit the RY ASAP after giving you a keep your speed up request, it's usually a time issue not a distance down the runway issue. But, you have to do whatever is comfortable to you.
 

gnx99

New Member
Pull power to idle, do a very aggressive forward slip while holding altitude, as soon as you hit Vfe (actually about 5kts slower because your actual airspeed is faster than you indicated airspeed), dump full flaps, and let it slow to normal landing speed. Get out of the slip and do a normal landing. You can get a C172 from 120 to 65 in less than a mile
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
[ QUOTE ]
What about the controller moaning at us gonig out of LAX when we were trying to maintain VFR by making a 10 degree right turn to go throw a cloud!! He wanted to watch you scud run it out of there.

[/ QUOTE ]


...and when did I say I was 'unable'? I put myself in a bad situation because I did not say the magic word; Turned out fine in the end and the experience gained was great. Do not make the same mistake; say 'unable'!
 

I_Money

Moderator
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
What about the controller moaning at us going out of LAX when we were trying to maintain VFR by making a 10 degree right turn to go through a cloud!! He wanted to watch you scud run it out of there.

[/ QUOTE ]


...and when did I say I was 'unable'? I put myself in a bad situation because I did not say the magic word; Turned out fine in the end and the experience gained was great. Do not make the same mistake; say 'unable'!

[/ QUOTE ]

I thought you did!?!?!? I still wonder how they could have seen our little turn towards the hole from the tower!!
 
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