Pushback With Thrust Reversers

Bell47

New Member
While passing thru Atlanta yesterday (on Delta, of course), I observed an aircraft pushback from the gate with thrust reversers only (no tug). I've never seen this before and, quite honestly, didn't know it was possible. Any comments?
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
It was probably American or Air Tran.

The DC-9 variants are approved by the manufacturer to "power back" with the usage of thrust reversers.
 

Tim

New Member
The 717 does powerbacks also.. The only one in ATL that do those are Airtran, American and Northwest.
 

Snow

'Not a new member'
Does Delta have a policy against powerbacks? Is that because of increased risk or maintaince costs?
 

CASHMAN737

New Member
Powerbacks are not listed in the ground ops manual as an acceptable method of pushing back Delta aircraft, (such as the 88). American Airlines does have powerback procedures and the method is widely used by the airline. Having worked for Delta Air Lines on the ramp for two summers I can say safety is big at the airline.

Chris Ashman
ERAU DB Campus
 

Bell47

New Member
It seemed to take quite a bit of throttle to power back.

What about the jet blast to ground handlers and those unsuspecting passengers in the rear of the aircraft - they'll be popping chutes again?

Come back to us on this, Doug.
 

sigmanu499

New Member
American does this alot. I have been on 3 flights that did it, on both MD-80 and F-100. The first time I was wondering if it was safe because I had heard that is what caused the Air Florida crash in the 80's at DCA. But if it means less ground crew to pay.....
 

Mr_Creepy

Well-Known Member
The Air Florida plane crashed because of ice buildup on the EPR probe. It caused the FO to set less than desired take off power because of the faulty high reading on the EPR gauges (EPR - Exhaust Pressure Ratio.) That's the first time I ever heard anyone reference a thrust reverser situation.

I'm trying to picture a possiblility that a power back might have thrown ice and snow on the EPR probe but I don't see how that could readily happen.
 

CF6_rep

New Member
I used to work on the ramp at American about 15 years ago. Many times the 727s powered back from the gates using thrust reversers. As far as safety for the ground crew, it got quite windy and we wore goggles (like those in high scholl shop class) to keep the little pebbles and rocks from hitting us in our eyes.
 

Tim

New Member
One problem Delta see with powerbacks is the increased chance of FOD ( Foreign Object Debris ). The bean counters also talk about the fuel increase also. But we have done dumber things with our money here.
 

N9103M

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
The Air Florida plane crashed because of ice buildup on the EPR probe. It caused the FO to set less than desired take off power because of the faulty high reading on the EPR gauges (EPR - Exhaust Pressure Ratio.) That's the first time I ever heard anyone reference a thrust reverser situation.

I'm trying to picture a possiblility that a power back might have thrown ice and snow on the EPR probe but I don't see how that could readily happen.

[/ QUOTE ]

When they backed out, they sprayed snow and slush back onto the wings and back into the engine inlet. Compounding the problem, Engine Anti-Ice was not turned on for the takeoff and so the EPR probe was not heated. And as you said it gave erronious readings and the EPR was not set properly for takeoff. Really sad chain of events....

--03M
 
When Powering back either a DC-9 or a 727, never stop with the brakes, or you will stand the plane on it's tail. We stop by applying forward thrust.
 
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