PSA pilot indicted for 2015 triple murder

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
“Do not acknowledge any further transmissions”
“Roger”
Smh
I was shooting a PAR into Yuma with a student in a Seminole once and after we got the don't acknowledge further transmissions bit, the controller said their was a raised arrestor cable 1500 feet from the approach end. That required a bit of conversation.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
I was shooting a PAR into Yuma with a student in a Seminole once and after we got the don't acknowledge further transmissions bit, the controller said their was a raised arrestor cable 1500 feet from the approach end. That required a bit of conversation.
Figure just land beyond it. Good thing is, between being on glidepath, flaring, and touchdown, you'd be beyond the E-28 sitting 6" above the runway surface on donuts anyway. Now, if you decide to duck-under passing the 100' DH, then that could be an issue.
 
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NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
I was shooting a PAR into Yuma with a student in a Seminole once and after we got the don't acknowledge further transmissions bit, the controller said their was a raised arrestor cable 1500 feet from the approach end. That required a bit of conversation.
A PAR in a Pa44? Dear god I feel bad for that controller! It was terrible doing them on B06 helicopters and Harriers cause of how slow they were.
 

guywhoflies

Y'NO WUT IM SAYIN
A PAR in a Pa44? Dear god I feel bad for that controller! It was terrible doing them on B06 helicopters and Harriers cause of how slow they were.
Oh yeah! I loved taking students to Yuma for the PAR. And when we got tired of standard PAR approaches, we would do no-gyro PARs.
 

guywhoflies

Y'NO WUT IM SAYIN
Honestly I always found it easier to work no-gyro PAR’s. No more remembering what heading your on or trying to go left 3 right 2 to get you left 1
That makes sense.

I was always impressed with how accurate the approach was. I would have a student using foggles, getting turns to headings (or no-gyro turns). It seemed like they were making big corrections, but we were barely off centerline and/or glide path before the controller would get them back on.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
That makes sense.

I was always impressed with how accurate the approach was. I would have a student using foggles, getting turns to headings (or no-gyro turns). It seemed like they were making big corrections, but we were barely off centerline and/or glide path before the controller would get them back on.
PAR accuracy is +/- 25' of runway centerline.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
That makes sense.

I was always impressed with how accurate the approach was. I would have a student using foggles, getting turns to headings (or no-gyro turns). It seemed like they were making big corrections, but we were barely off centerline and/or glide path before the controller would get them back on.
As much as I hated doing them there’s not many things more satisfying than successfully working a guy in OVC001 to the ground
 

msmspilot

Well-Known Member
As much as I hated doing them there’s not many things more satisfying than successfully working a guy in OVC001 to the ground
Well, this thread is completely off the rails. :)

Douglas Adams wrote, "It can hardly be a coincidence that no language on Earth has ever produced the expression 'as pretty as an airport'." I maintain he never saw a set of ALSF-II at minimums at the end of a long day.
 

drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
I usually check in like so: "SLC departure. Diamond Star N745SP, with you 5.5 miles from Ogden airport. 5,300 for 6,500. With information Echo."

My CFI corrects me from time to time. Says I'm not using correct radio phraseology. That I shouldn't use "with you" and that I should be as short/concise on the radio as possible.
What @NickH said, except the "november" part of the call is superfluous when you say your type. And I generally assume controllers already know where they are, so just "departure" is good enough. Aproach might care about the ATIS, departure most likely does not (probably the same person, but still). And your position is also not really necessary for a frequency change if you already have a squawk. When you are that low, they are most likely going to ask you to ident anyway.

"Salt Lake Departure, Diamond Star 745SP, 5,300 climbing 6,300" is more like what I hear the most (around here from non-students).

The call from an old fart like me is "Departure, Diamond Star 745SP, 5.5 for 6.3" when it is busy. When it isn't busy, I promise I use correct phraseology :)

Just never say "with you." Anything else is forgivable. That is not.

EDIT: your distance is also meaningless without a bearing to something. 5 miles North of Ogden would make more sense if you are going to mention it.
 
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What @NickH said, except the "november" part of the call is superfluous when you say your type. And I generally assume controllers already know where they are, so just "departure" is good enough. Aproach might care about the ATIS, departure most likely does not (probably the same person, but still). And your position is also not really necessary for a frequency change if you already have a squawk. When you are that low, they are most likely going to ask you to ident anyway.

"Salt Lake Departure, Diamond Star 745SP, 5,300 climbing 6,300" is more like what I hear the most (around here from non-students).

The call from an old fart like me is "Departure, Diamond Star 745SP, 5.5 for 6.3" when it is busy. When it isn't busy, I promise I use correct phraseology :)

Just never say "with you." Anything else is forgivable. That is not.

EDIT: your distance is also meaningless without a bearing to something. 5 miles North of Ogden would make more sense if you are going to mention it.
In the training environment, here SLC controllers seem to like us to state our distance, intentions and ident once we're given a squawk.
 

FloridaLarry

Well-Known Member
We were talking about the spelling of court martial in the article.
I agree. I'm blessed by being a normally-excellent speller but I recognize that there are others in this world. Unlike, say, blonde hair (which many alter - been married to a couple of them ) this seems awfully permanent. It doesn't have to be, of course.

As one who hired for a couple of decades, I automatically downgraded any candidate whose resume included misspelled words in the technical vocabulary of the profession.
 
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